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Commencement

Great Grads - Howa Yeung

BS, Biomedical Science (Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education)


Graduating from the Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education with a 4.0 GPA is as close to a Holy Grail quest that one can find in the rigorous program.  "Clearly not an easy feat," Dr. Dani McBeth, Associate Dean for Student Affairs, stresses.

However, Howa Yeung, the top student in the Sophie Davis Class of 2010, achieved it. The Hong Kong native is headed to New York University School of Medicine this fall with an impressive record of volunteerism and research on top of his academic feats.

Mr. Yeung, who came to the United States at age 13, made dean's list 10 consecutive semesters.  Other honors include the Sophie and Leonard Davis Scholarship, the Leopold Schepp Foundation Scholarship, the Benjamin and Beulah Massey Scholarship, the Downer Language Award in French, the Bailey W. Diffie Award and the Leonard Davis Community Service Fellowship, for which he volunteered at In Arms Reach.

His academic excellence was also rewarded with his selection as one of six teaching assistants for the Health, Medicine and Society courses that Sophie Davis students take in the spring semester of their second year.

In addition, Mr. Yeung was chosen to work with Dr. Ernie Drucker as a teaching assistant for a Public Health course at Columbia University.  He also received the Rudin Research Fellowship, which supported his research in the laboratory of Dr. Serafin Pinol-Roma to study mitochondrial proteins.

In one of his final achievements at CCNY, Mr. Yeung co-authored a paper on promoting smoking cessation programs among low-income minority smokers that was published online by the "Journal of Community Health."

How did Mr. Yeung manage to find time for all this?  "It takes a lot of hard work, sacrifice and self discipline," says the upper Manhattan resident.  That, and a passion to offer medical care to underserved communities, has been his motivation.

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 Howa Yeung

"It takes a lot of hard work, sacrifice and self discipline," says the upper Manhattan resident. That, and a passion to offer medical care to underserved communities, has been his motivation.