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Grove School of Engineering

About Us

Combining access and affordability with outstanding instruction and research, the Grove School of Engineering at The City College of New York plays a key role in developing a diverse workforce to meet the technological challenges facing today’s world. Named for Andrew S. Grove, ’60, a Hungarian immigrant who became one of the founders of Intel Corp., it is the only public school of engineering within New York City and one of the most diverse engineering schools in the nation.

The Grove School traces its roots to the earliest days of The City College, which was established in 1847 at The Free Academy. In 1853, a class in civil engineering became a requirement for all students. The City College School of Technology, which became the School of Engineering in 1962, was established in 1919.

Approximately 2,400 students pursue degrees at the Baccalaureate, Masters and Ph.D. levels in seven disciplines: Biomedical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering. With funding from the National Institutes of Health, the Biomedical Engineering Department is establishing a “national urban model for minority biomedical engineering education.”

The School is housed in Steinman Hall, at the north end of City College’s 36-acre campus in the Hamilton Heights section of Upper Manhattan. Steinman Hall is named for David Steinman, an alumnus and master bridge builder whose projects include the New York’s Henry Hudson Bridge and the Mackinac Bridge linking Michigan’s upper and lower peninsulas.

As a result of a restructuring of doctoral-level education by the City University of New York, The Grove School was authorized in 2008 to grant the Ph.D. degree; previously the awarding of Ph.D.s was the purview of the CUNY Graduate Center. The significance of this change cannot be underestimated. It impacts everything at The Grove School from recruiting and retaining outstanding students and first-class faculty to obtaining external support for our growing research activities.

Over the past two years, The Grove School has bolstered the ranks of its faculty with the hiring of new senior members – at the Distinguished Professor or Professor Level – in each of its six departments. They include Dr. Charles Vorosmarty, an internationally recognized hydrologist; Dr. Sanjoy Banerjee, who has been recognized for for his seminal work on transport phenomena in multiphase systems, and Dr. William Rossow, one of the world’s most-cited geophysicists.

They join a faculty with nearly 120 full-time members who are held in high esteem both for their research and teaching. Five Grove School faculty members hold membership in the National Academies; one, CUNY Distinguished Research Professor Sheldon Weinbaum is one of only six living Americans to hold memberships in all three: the National Academy of Science, National Academy of Engineering and Institute of Medicine.

Other recent awards to Grove School Faculty include the American Institute of Chemical Engineer’s (AIChE) 2008 Founders Award to Dr. Morton M. Denn, Albert Einstein Professor of Science and Engineering, for outstanding contributions in the chemical engineering field, and the American Society for Engineering Education’s (ASEE) the 2008 Ralph Coats Roe Award to Dr. Latif M. Jiji, Herbert M. Kayser Professor of Mechanical Engineering, in recognition of his teaching excellence.

Because of its academic excellence and the diversity of its students, Grove School graduates are highly sought after in the marketplace. Prominent corporations such as General Electric, IBM, Raytheon and Toyota, as well as leading agencies at the federal, state and local level regularly recruit from the Grove School.

When Andrew Grove gave his transformative gift in 2004, City College President Gregory H. Williams said it would “enable The City College School of Engineering to take its place among the best schools of engineering in the nation.” The Grove School of Engineering is engineering a future that will fulfill that prophesy.