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City College Fellowships Program

Attendance: Workshops and Forums

Fellowship events are designed to provide Fellows with important information and support, encourage achievement, and bring the community together on a regular basis. Requirements for attendance are as follows. (Please note that Fellows are always welcome to attend more events than are required. All Fellows—recently admitted and graduating—are also welcome and encouraged to present papers at the annual Research Conference.) 

 

During First and Second Semester

During their first and second semesters in the Program, all Fellows are required to attend:

  • Orientation meeting (at the beginning of the semester when a fellow enters the program)

Fall semester:
  • Fellowship Dinner
  • Forum: "On Research"
  • Roundtable: Summer research experiences
  •  Workshop: Financing education and research
Also, at least two of the following:
  • Workshop: Building Academic Skills
  • Workshop: Mental health
  • Roundtable : Mentoring
  • Roundtable: Race, class, and gender in the academy

Spring semester:

  • Fellowship Dinner
  • Forum: "On Research"
  • Fellowships Program Research Conference
  • Workshop: The mentoring relationship
  • Workshop: Applying to graduate school
Also, at least one of the following:
  • Workshop: Public Speaking
  • Workshop: Balancing work/career and life
  • Roundtable: Applying to grad school (Q&A followup on workshop)

During Third and Forth Semester

During their third and forth semesters in the Program, all Fellows are required to attend (with seniors serving as panelists and discussion leaders when appropriate):


Fall semester:

  • Fellowship Dinner
  • Forum: "On Research"
  • Roundtable: Summer research experiences
  • Workshop: Writing the statement of purpose
Also, at least two of the following:
  • Workshop: Building Academic Skills
  • Workshop: Mental health
  • Roundtable: Mentoring
  • Roundtable:  Race, class, and gender in the academy

Spring semester:

  • Fellowship Dinner
  • Forum: "On Research"
  • Fellowships Program Research Conference
  • Workshop: Applying to graduate school

Also, at least one of the following:
  • Workshop: Public Speaking
  • Workshop: Balancing work/career and life
  • Roundtable: Applying to grad school (Q&A follow up on workshop)

Beyond Four Semesters

Fellows who remain in the program beyond four semesters are required to attend:

Fall semester:

  • Fellowship Dinner
  • Forum: "On Research"
  • Roundtable: Summer research experiences
  • Workshop: Writing the statement of purpose
Also: serve as panelist or discussion leader at one of the semester's events
   
Spring semester:
  • Fellowship Dinner
  • Forum: "On Research"
  • Fellowships Program Research Conference
Also: serve as panelist or discussion leader at one of the semester's events and/or present research at the research conference

 

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Stipends are paid in part to compensate Fellows for their participation in these activities; failure to attend required workshops, roundtables, and the forum may result in the reduction of the stipend.  In some cases, absence from a required event is excusable, for example in cases of emergency or serious illness or injury.  Other legitimate excuses include travel out of town for an emergency or for academic purposes, or presentation of your own work in a class or at a department event.
 
Excuses that are not legitimate include preferring to attend a different lecture or event, "forgetting" to come, "not knowing" about an event, needing the time to prepare for a test, scheduling an appointment that could be scheduled for another time, and so on.  
 
Whenever a Fellow will be absent from a required event, she or he should notify the office beforehand explaining the circumstances, or in the case of an emergency, as soon as possible.  Dates of the workshops and the forum are set before the semester begins, sent in the mail to Fellows, and posted outside the NAC 6/316 office and on the website.  It is your responsibility to know the schedule and which events you are required to attend each semester. If you have any questions or would like to propose different requirements considering your particular situation, please contact the Director in advance. Responsible and professional behavior from Fellows is expected; learning to meet these expectations is an important part of preparing to succeed in graduate school and professional life.
 
Orientation Meeting (both semesters).  The Director introduces incoming Fellows to the Program's benefits, goals, requirements, and culture.
To the extent possible in the time available, the Director also provides information about academic opportunities and suggestions for how to get the most from your undergraduate education.
 
Fellowship Dinner (both semesters).  A celebratory dinner on a Friday evening near the beginning of the semester; sometimes preceded by a roundtable discussion with graduated Fellows who are currently PhD students.
 
Forum: "On Research" (both semesters). An informal presentation by a faculty member on some aspect(s) of his or her research. The forums are meant to expose Fellows to theoretical, methodological, political, logistical, and personal issues that professors encounter in the process of  "doing research" across the disciplines.  Followed by questions and answers.
 
Roundtable: Summer research experiences (fall). Fellows share their experiences participating in structured summer research programs and pursuing independent projects. The goal is to provide inspiration and information about a wide range of opportunities, while also helping Fellows to learn about one another's interests.
 
Workshop: Writing the statement of purpose (fall). Seniors applying to graduate school workshop drafts of their statements of purpose with a guest workshop leader.  
 
Workshop: Financing your education & research (fall). Provides information on how to finance your undergraduate education so that it can be your first priority.  Looks ahead to opportunities for graduate school fellowships.
 
Workshop: Building Academic Skills (fall). Topics vary year to year, including: strategies for advanced writing (and rewriting); time management; building cultural capital; etc.
 
Workshop: Mental health (fall).  Strategies for how to stay healthy and happy when the demands of life seem overwhelming, with guest speaker.  
 
Roundtable: Mentoring (fall).  Fellows share what they have learned about how to build productive mentoring relationships and what to do when things go badly.   
 
Roundtable: Race, class, and gender in the academy (fall). Fellows—including those who have spent summers studying at elite private universities or in different regions of the country or in different countries—compare experiences and share their observations about how race, class, and gender structure American universities.
 
Fellowships Program Research Conference (spring). Held on a Friday in early May, this conference showcases the research done by Fellows to peers, faculty mentors, invited guests, and the CCNY community. It provides a supportive environment for Fellows to give their first papers. All Fellows—recently admitted and graduating—are welcome and encouraged to present papers.
 
Workshop: The mentoring relationship (spring). With the input of invited faculty mentors, explores aspects of the complex and essential mentoring relationship. Tips for how to get the mentoring you want.  What to do if things go badly.  
 
Workshop: Applying to graduate school (spring). A panel of seniors who have gained acceptance to PhD programs pass on what they have learned. Many handouts are provided to help guide the next cohorts of Fellows through this challenging process.
 
Workshop: Public Speaking (spring).  A workshop geared to helping those who plan to present papers at the annual Research Conference.
 
Workshop: Balancing work/career and life (spring).  A discussion with invited faculty guests on the challenges and rewards of seeking to build both a family and a career.
 
Roundtable: Applying to grad school; Q&A follow up on workshop (spring).  Since club hours is always too short a period to explore the many important issues in applying to graduate school, this more informal follow-up discussion with seniors headed to PhD programs provides a chance for Fellows to ask more questions.