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History

Spring 2014 Courses

Undergraduate Courses


31156 Writing History
In this course, students will identify how masterful writers of history wield language with authority and power.  Through close analysis of a range of writing styles, targeted exercises, writing, and rewriting, students will develop a more authoritative style and unique personal voice.
MW 3:30-4:45pm            Susan Besse

49300 Einstein and His World
This course will introduce students to Einstein's scientific achievements and their impacts; it will also address his views on social, political, and religious issues in the context of the world he lived. In particular, students will explore Einstein's own writing on world peace and scientists' social responsibilities. .
TH 5:00-6:15pm           Danian Hu

31143 Food and Farming                                         
This course will introduce students to the history and historiography of food and farming, including the role of agricultural producers in advanced and pre-industrial societies.  Central to the enterprise is the historical trajectories certain foodstuffs have taken – why they are produced and where, how they have been integrated into socio-economic and cultural environments, and how politics and policies affect and are affected by them.  We will begin with classic readings on peasants and move on from there.  Our geographic focus will be on the European experience liberally construed.
MW 2:00-3:15pm  Barbara Syrrakos

EUROPE

20600 Modern Europe
An overview of social, economic, political, and intellectual developments in Europe from the Enlightenment to the present, and an introduction to the study of history. Topics include the problems of revolution, industrialization and the transformation of rural societies, the emergence of liberalism and the challenges it has faced in the 20th century.
MW 11:00am-12:15pm  Barbara Syrrakos    MW 5:00-6:15pm James Lewis

32900 20th Century Europe
What's Freud got to do with feminism? Or Horkheimer with Hitler, Christian Democracy with the European Union, or colonial independence movements in Africa and Asia with radical student politics in Paris and Prague? You'll find the answers to these and other questions in this course, which covers Europe during the Frist World War, the Russian Revolution, the rise of Fascism and Nazism, the Second World War, and their aftermath. You'll read what the men and women who shaped the 20th Century had to say about it. And you'll learn what it means to evaluate their ideas and actions from a variety of perspectives.
TTH 2:00-3:15pm            Clifford Rosenberg

35000 The Scientific Revolution
Especial emphasis will be placed upon the institutions, sociability and material culture of science in the early modern scientific theory..
TTH 11:00-12:15pm            Barbara Naddeo

42900 Minorities in Europe
What does it mean to be a minority in Europe? What role does gender, class, religion, ethnicity, and place of origin have in this discussion? How did liberalism, authoritarianism, fascism, and communism impact the discussion? Focusing on the 19th and 20th centuries, this course examines themes of citizenship, religious and ethnic rights, movements toward legal equality, racism, ethnic cleansing, immigration policies, and multiculturalism..
MW 12:30am-1:45pm        Emily Greble

41500 French Revolution
This course will provide a thorough introduction to the French Revolution – one of the defining events of modern times, and the crucible in which key elements of modern politics were forged or redefined. Although concentrating on the crucial years 1787-1794, we will spend several weeks on the Old regime, to place revolutionary developments in perspective and range into the 20th century to assess its legacy..
TH 9:30-10:45am            Clifford Rosenberg

UNITED STATES

24000 US History to 1865
The major theological and social conflicts of 17th century English colonies; the political and ideological process that defined an American identity; the social and economic forces that shaped the early republic; the nature of the civil war.
TTH 11:00-12:15pm            Richard Boles

24100 US Since 1865
Examines the social conflicts that accompanied the transformation of the United States from an agrarian republic and slave society to one of the most powerful industrial nations in the world. Particular attention will be paid to the building of new social and economic institutions and to cultural and visual representations of the nation and its people.
MW 11:00am-12:15pm        Matthew Vaz

31129 US Family History
This course involves reading classic and newer texts in the history of the family in the US from colonial times into the 20th century. Students will read three books and a number of articles. They will study various research approaches to family history including demographics, oral history, narratives, etc. and discuss the evolution of family structure over time. Students will also practice approaches to finding and analyzing family history including documents, photographs, material culture, family trees, etc.
MW 12:30-1:45      Harriet Alonso

31156 Age of Human Rights
The seminar explores the historical origins and development of human-rights thinking and politics in the United States and, to a lesser extent, Europe by analyzing the intellectual, legal, and political background of the concept of human rights. To begin, the course seeks to understand how and why humanity as a whole came to be valued in the West, and then asks: how did the slowly developing worldview of humanitarianism conceive of human beings and treatment.
MW 3:30-4:45pm            Anne Kornhauser

32400 Civil War & Reconstruction                                 
An examination of the causes, events, and consequences, of the Civil War. Special attention will be paid to slavery, abolition, and sectionalism, emancipation and the role of African-American soldiers, and the cultural meaning of the war and its aftermath.  Readings will include speeches and poems by William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Abraham Lincoln, and Walt Whitman, novels by Michael Schaar and Toni Morrison, and analyses by Robert Penn Warren, Drew Faust, James McPherson and Eric Foner.
MW 3:30-4:45pm      Gregory Downs.

37600 Women of the African Diaspora

The various contemporary situations and problems peculiar to Afro-American women in community and in American society. A study of such institutions as marriage, family, and child rearing practices, religion, politics and business. Attention also given to how she is projected in literature and theatre. Comparison study of African and Caribbean women.   
TTH 8:00am-9:15am        Venus Green

31255 American Religious History
This course explores religions practiced by people of European, African, and Native American descent in the United States from the colonial era to the twentieth century.  Through extensive readings, lectures, and class discussions, students will learn about various religious beliefs and practices as well as how religions changed in America over time.  The class will also critically analyze how historians approach the study of religion.
TTH 3:30-4:45pm            Richard Boles

36500 African-American History Since Emancipation

The post-slavery experience of Afro-Americans: the creation and destruction of a black peasantry, the growth of a black working class, and the resulting change in black politics and culture.
TH 9:30-10:45am            Venus Green

LATIN AMERICA

28200 Modern Latin America
A broad historical introduction to Latin American and Caribbean development in the context of global history, focusing on colonialism, the Atlantic slave and sugar economies, revolution, nationalism, race and racism, topics economic modernization, migration/emigration, and social movements. The approach will be chronological and thematic, with particular attention to the influence of Latin American and Caribbean development beyond the borders of continent.
MW 9:30-10:45pm            Gerardo Renique

31162 Food, Gender and Politics in Latin America
Bringing together scholarship on the history of commodities, gender, nationalism, and transnational migrations, this class explores the politics of food—its production, marketing, consumption, and cultural and symbolic values—in Latin America since the Spanish conquest.
TTH 11:00am-12:15pm        Susan Besse

31165 Crime & Policing in Latin America   
  
This readings-driven course will examine the history of crime and policing in Latin America and the Caribbean from the late 19th century to the present. With a particular focus on Mexico and Brazil, this course will explore the ways in which crime and deviance are defined and constructed. Through a series of case studies, we will analyze how the policing of criminal behavior reinforces social and economic stratifications. We will also study crime from a transnational perspective as we consider the ways in which the United States has shaped and driven the priorities and patterns of policing in Latin America and the Caribbean.
MW 2:00-3:15     Matthew Vaz

MIDDLE EAST AND AFRICA

New: History of the Egypt
This course looks at the history of Egypt from Muhammad Ali to Morsi. We will pay particular attention to revolutionary moments, including rebellions against the French occupation, the Urabi Revolt, the 1919 Revolution, the Free Officer Revolt, and the Arab Spring. What links all of these movements? How do colonialism, nationalism, and Islamism factor in?
TTH 2:00-3:15pm            Beth Baron

48600 Arab-Israeli Conflict
The collision of two nationalist movements—Palestinian and Zionist—competing for the same territory. We'll start with a brief review of the political history of the conflict: declarations and promised, successive wars, attempts at peace. We'll then turn to an exploration of the cultural memories, and symbols that are used to build a sense of Israeli or Palestinian solidarity. Both communities suffer from internal and social divisions such as splits between religious and secular parties, which will be examined. Throughout the course we will use film, fiction, poetry and prose to examine how both parties have faced the conflict, explained it, and tried to overcome it.
MW 2:00-3:15pm        Craig Daigle

New: War and Peace in Africa
This course is designed to introduce students to the major issues and debates concerning humanitarianism and international intervention in the 20th century. The first part of the course will explore the rise of humanitarian institutions and the proliferation of humanitarian doctrines in the first half of the twentieth century. It will analyze the evolution of international laws intended to protect individuals and nations as well as analyze the limitations of these laws. In the second part of the course, students will investigate specific sites of conflict in Africa (ranging from Algeria, Nigeria, Somalia, Rwanda, and Sudan) and analyze different models of humanitarian organizations and compare strategies for intervention and aid. These case studies will expose students to pivotal events in African history and equip them with a critical vocabulary with which to assess contemporary challenges that Africans, humanitarian organizations, and civically-minded individuals around the world continue to face.
TTH 11:00-12:15pm         Jennifer Johnson Onyedum

New: Medicine, Empire, Africa
This course will explore the major debates in the history of medicine in Africa from the late nineteenth century through the twentieth century. The central questions in this course will focus on the evolving notions of medicine, health, and healing in Africa and issues of efficacy. What are some of the ways Africans practice and understand medicine? How have these practices interacted with other medical systems? What impact did colonialism have on the production of medical knowledge? How were practices and treatments evaluated and deemed effective? By whom and on what grounds? Students will learn thematic and historical frameworks with which to assess the coexistence of a variety of healing traditions and medical understandings across the African continent. Students will also examine tensions over the discipline and practice of medicine and healing, colonial production of knowledge, the training and integration of African personnel, the politics of reproduction and one of the most important challenges to contemporary public health, HIV/AIDS.
TTH 2:00-3:15pm            Jennifer Johnson Onyedum


ASIA

25300 Modern China
This course surveys three and a half centuries of modern Chinese history. It will cover major political, economic, cultural, and intellectual developments and changes from the late Ming Dynasty to the end of Nationalist rule in Mainland China. A goal of this course is to provide students historical background to better understand China's contemporary triumphs and frustrations through the mirror of history.
TTH 3:30-4:45pm            Danian Hu

47000 Religions of India
This course will explore the many religious of India, including the dominant Hinduism, along with Buddhism, Jainism, Islam, Sikhism, and Zoroastrianism. Central themes include the origins of each religious tradition; the philosophical underpinnings and the historical growth of each religion; and the social and political conflict/accom-modation of multiple religious traditions in modern India.
TF 12:30-1:45pm            Ravi Kalia


Graduate Courses

B0000 History Method Historiography   
This course will focus on the culture of colonialism. We will examine "the interpretive turn" in contemporary cultural history through our study of several exemplary texts. We will focus on the problem of "culture" and the "colonial/postcolonial". Approaches to these topics include ethno-historians, labor history, literary scholars, "new historicists", women's studies, and cultural anthropology. This course required for all MA students. Closed to all Undergraduates Except 35F
M 4:50-6:50pm       Emily Greble    NA5/142

B0910 History of Human Rights
This seminar explores the historical origins and development of human rights thinking and politics in the United States and, to a lesser extent, Europe by analyzing the intellectual, legal, and political background of the concept of human rights. To begin, the course seeks to understand how and why humanity as a whole came to be valued in the West, and then asks: how did the slowly developing worldview of humanitarianism—the precursor to modern human rights-conceive of human beings and their proper of humane treatments? This course has several goals. One is establish what it means to think historically about a concept that today is taken for granted and whose existence seems natural. Another is to explore how moral and political ideas can help inform historical study. The goal will be to produce a research paper on a topic concerning the history of human rights.
W 7:00-9:00pm         Anne Kornhauser    NA5/142

B2321 Research Colloquium

This course is an intensive workshop on the art and craft of writing primary source-based research papers of History and related disciplines. To enroll in the course, you need the permission of the instructor. You should have a project underway before the start of the semester in order to increase your chances of completing a polished paper by the end of the semester.
T 7:00-9:00pm  Barbara Naddeo  NAC 5/142

B4403 Madness and Civilization
Examines social, cultural, intellectual and institutional aspects of the history of madness in Europe since 1789. The course will begin with the age of the so-called "Great Confinement," then move on to consider the institutional and therapeutic reforms of the revolutionary and post-revolutionary era; the rise of theories of degeneration, hysteria and neurasthenia in the second half of the 19th century; psychoanalysis and sexology; war neurosis and military psychiatry; psychiatry under the Nazis. It will conclude by looking at the anti-psychiatry movements of the 1960s and the new biological psychiatry of the 1980s and 1990s
T 4:50-6:50pm     Andreas Killen   NAC 5/142

B0807 Arab-Israeli Conflict

The collision of two nationalist movements—Palestinian and Zionist—competing for the same territory. We'll start with a brief review of the political history of the conflict: declarations and promised, successive wars, attempts at peace. We'll then turn to an exploration of the cultural memories, and symbols that are used to build a sense of Israeli or Palestinian solidarity. Both communities suffer from internal and social divisions such as splits between religious and secular parties, which will be examined. Throughout the course we will use film, fiction, poetry and prose to examine how both parties have faced the conflict, explained it, and tried to overcome it.
W 4:50-6:50pm    Craig Daigle   NAC 5/142

B0303 Europe 1815-1914
The political triumphs of the middle classes and their troubled hegemony; the factory system, free trade, parliamentarianism; the transformations of 1848; the Second Empire; Italian and German unifications; movements of reform; democratic currents; socialism; the new imperialism.
W 7:00-9:30       James Lewis   NAC 5/142