Share This
Faculty and Staff Profiles

Jerry Guyden

Professor | RCMI Director

School/Division

Division of Science

Department

Biology

Office

Marshak Science Building MR633 (office) | MR601 (lab)

p: 212.650.8449 (office)

p: 212-650-8574 (lab)

f: 212-650-8585

e: jerry@sci.ccny.cuny.edu

w: View my website >>

  • Profile

    Dr. Guyden is a molecular immunologist whose research interests center on the function of thymic nurse cells (TNCs) - specialized epithelial cells that contain T cells completely enclosed in intra-cytoplasmic vacuoles.  Recent research in his lab indicates that TNCs may house the MHC restriction process.  Dr. Guyden is the Director of the RCMI (Research Centers in Minority Institutions) at City College.


  • Education

    Ph.D. from UC Berkeley, 1979.


  • Courses Taught

    Biology 22900 - Cell and Molecular Biology
    Biology V1400 - Cell Biology (Graduate level)


  • Research Interests

    Jerry Guyden is a molecular immunologist whose research interests center on the function of thymic nurse cells (TNCs) Thymic nurse cells (TNCs) are specialized epithelial components that contain T cells completely enclosed in intra-cytoplasmic vacuoles. Very little information about their function has been reported because of the lack of pure TNC populations in quantities necessary for thorough analyses. However, they are believed to play a role in thymocyte development. Our laboratory has been able to immortalize TNCs. Surprisingly, cells from TNC lines have been shown to internalize thymocytes in in vitro studies. Intact cells can be visualized in cytoplasmic vacuoles. This is the first report of the isolation of TNC lines able to internalization and maintain viable another type of cell in tissue culture. Since that time, we have shown that TNCs exclusively bind and internalize the αβTCR+CD4+CD8+ subset. A subset of the interactive subset dies through the process of apoptosis while the remaining fraction survives and matures to the αβTCRhiCD69hi stage of development. Our lab continues to study the function of TNCs during T cell development.

     

  • Additional Information

<< Back To Directory