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Faculty and Staff Profiles

Lynn Tarlow

Assistant Professor

School/Division

School of Education

Department

Secondary Education: Mathematics Education

Office

NAC 3/207B

p: 212-650-6785

e: ltarlow@ccny.cuny.edu

  • Profile

    Lynn Tarlow is a CUNY alumna, having graduated Brooklyn College with a B.S. in Mathematics, magna cum laude. She earned her M.S. in Special Education from Fordham University and her Ed.D. in Mathematics Education from Rutgers University, where she was awarded the Rutgers University Graduate School of Education Alumni Association Award. 

    Dr. Tarlow’s professional experience began in 1985 as a classroom teacher, primarily in middle and high school mathematics. In addition to teaching various grade levels of heterogeneous mathematics classes, she created and taught mathematics programs for specialized populations: gifted students, students with learning challenges, and newly arrived immigrants for whom English was a second language. 

    Concurrent with these activities, Dr. Tarlow spent many years providing professional development for elementary, middle, and high school mathematics teachers, and taught graduate-level methods courses to Brooklyn College mathematics education teacher candidates. Her focus was to help the teachers to: develop a deeper understanding of mathematics; better understand how children build mathematical ideas; and successfully implement learning conditions that foster students’ mathematical empowerment. 

    Thus, Dr. Tarlow came to CCNY in 2004 with experience that was a combination of research-based theoretical knowledge and empirical knowledge formulated as a result of many years of successful teaching, in addition to many years of work creating and implementing professional development opportunities for teachers in classes and on-site in the teachers’ classrooms. 

    As a tenured member of the CCNY faculty, Dr. Tarlow’s teaching, scholarship, and service are integrated to focus on her stated ultimate objective: the teaching and learning of powerful mathematics—with understanding, confidence, and enthusiasm—for all students, particularly the disadvantaged. Below are some of Dr. Tarlow’s activities towards this goal.

  • Education

    Degrees

    Ed.D. Mathematics Education, Rutgers University

    M.S. Special Education, Fordham University  

    B.S. Mathematics, Brooklyn College, CUNY

    Certifications

    New York State Mathematics 7-12

    New York State Special Education

  • Courses Taught

    EDSE 0201I: Action Research in Mathematics Education  

    EDSE 2700E: Middle and Secondary School Mathematics: Teaching Developmentally

    EDSE 6100E: Teaching Mathematics in Secondary Schools  

    EDSE 6103E: Teaching and Learning Middle School Mathematics  

    EDSE 6400E: Curriculum and Instruction in Mathematics Education  

    EDSE 6401E: Curriculum, Assessment, and Instruction in Mathematics Education

    MATHE 8106N: Algebra for Middle School Teachers

  • Research Interests

    My primary interest lies in improving mathematics education in schools, so that all students have equitable access to mathematics and may thereby become mathematically literate, as well as motivated, confident critical thinkers and problem solvers. Towards this goal, my research centers on two interrelated themes: students’ development of mathematical ideas and fostering teachers’ facilitation of this development.

  • Publications

    Books

    Tarlow-Hellman, L. & Fosnot, C. T. (2007). Exploring parks and playgrounds: Multiplication and division of fractions. Portsmith, NH: Heinemann. 

    Hersch, S. B., Tarlow, L. D., Fosnot, C. T., & Cameron, A. (2006). Exploring playgrounds- A context for multiplication of fractions. Portsmith, NH: Heinemann. 

    Book Chapters

    Tarlow, L. D. (2010). Pizzas, towers, and binomials. In C. A. Maher, A. B. Powell, & E. B. Uptegrove (Eds.) Combinatorics and Reasoning: Representing, Justifying and Building Isomorphisms. (pp. 123-134). New York: Springer. 

    Tarlow, L. D. & Uptegrove, E. B. (2010). Block towers: Co-construction of proof. In C. A. Maher, A. B. Powell, & E. B. Uptegrove (Eds.) Combinatorics and Reasoning: Representing, Justifying and Building Isomorphisms. (pp. 97-106). New York: Springer. 

    Refereed Journal Articles

    Tarlow, L. D. (2008). Sense-able combinatorics: Students' use of personal representations [Focus Issue on Developing Mathematical Understanding through Representations]. Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, 13, 484-489. 

    Bulgar, S. A. & Tarlow, L. D. (1999). Using problem solving in homogeneous groups to develop thoughtful mathematics. Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, 4, 478–483.

    Translated to Portuguese and reprinted by IICBA - UNESCO:  (2001). Grupos Homogéneos Desenvolvem Matemática Pensada. Instituto Internacional da Capacitação em África (IICBA) da Organização das Nações Unidas para a Educação, Ciência e Cultura.

    Refereed Conference Proceedings

    Tarlow-Hellman, L. (2007). Tracing students’ use of meaningful representations in their development of combinatorial reasoning and justification. In T. Lamberg, & L. R. West (Eds.) Proceedings of the twenty-ninth annual meeting of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, North American Chapter (pp. 588-595). Stateline, NV: University of Nevada, Reno. 

    Tarlow, L. D. (2004). Students’ development of meaningful mathematical proofs for their ideas. In D. E. McDougall & J. A. Ross (Eds.). Proceedings of the twenty-sixth annual meeting of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, North American Chapter. (vol. 2, pp. 647-653). Toronto, Canada: OISE/UT.

  • Additional Information

    Research & Professional Development Grants

    A Longitudinal Study of Teacher Change in Facilitating Mathematizing in Relation to a Model of Professional Development and Student Achievement. Funded by the PSC-CUNY 43 Research Award Program. 2012–2013.

    Building Collaborative Learning Communities in Middle Schools. Funded by the New York City Department of Education. 2007–2010.  

    Assessing Teacher Development in Facilitating Mathematizing. Funded by the PSC-CUNY 37, 38, and 39 Research Award Programs. 2006–2009.

    Developing Collaborative Communities of Practice (with A. Cameron and C. Fosnot). Funded by the NYC Department of Education and the Kornfeld Foundation. 2005–2007.

    Invited Presentations

    (2006, March). A focus of the new (and the old) standards: Problem solving in mathematics and beyond. Sonia Kovalevsky Day at St. John’s University. Jamaica, NY.

    (2005, November). From pizzas to Pascal’s triangle: The role of students’ representations in their development of combinatorial reasoning and justification. Colloquium at The Robert B. Davis Institute for Learning, Rutgers University Graduate School of Education. New Brunswick, NJ.

    Refereed Conference Presentations                                 (only international & national conferences listed)

    (2012, June). Assessing change in facilitating mathematizing: Results of a successful teacher development program. Science and Mathematics Teacher Imperative 2012 National Conference. Alexandria, Va.

    (2012, June). An Algebra course for teachers framed by the common core standards. Science and Mathematics Teacher Imperative 2012 National Conference. Alexandria, Va. (with L. Gellert)

    (2009, April). Sense-able symbols: Algebra for all students. National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Annual Meeting. Washington, DC.

    (2008, January). Facilitating students’ development of mathematical reasoning and proof making. Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators 12th Annual Conference. Tulsa, OK. 

    (2007, October). Tracing students’ use of meaningful representations in their development of combinatorial reasoning and justification. Twenty-ninth Annual Meeting of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, North American Chapter. Stateline, NV. 

    (2007, January). Empowering teachers: Establishing collaborative communities of practice. Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators 11th Annual Conference. Irvine, CA. (with A. Cameron) 

    (2006, November). Students’ use of representations in their development of combinatorial reasoning and justification. Twenty-eighth Annual Meeting of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, North American Chapter. Mérida, Mexico. 

    (2006, February). Students’ use of representations to develop ideas in combinatorics. Special Interest Group of the Mathematical Association of America Ninth Conference on Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education. Piscataway, NJ. 

    (2005, October). Students’ use of representations in their development of mathematical reasoning and meaningful proof. Twenty-seventh Annual Meeting of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, North American Chapter. Roanoke, VA. 

    (2004, October). Students’ development of meaningful mathematical proofs for their ideas. Twenty-sixth Annual Meeting of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, North American Chapter. Toronto, Canada.

    Professional Service

    Invited Panel Member: National Science Foundation (Division of Research on Learning in Formal and Informal Settings) Selection Committee for the Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics Teaching. 

    Director: NYC Department of Education and Mathematics in the City Middle School Professional Development Initiative: Building Collaborative Communities of Practice (2005-2007) 

    Professional Development:
    • NYC Middle-Schools (11 Regions):                                                                            Mathematics Coaches and Teachers (2005–2010)
    • The Austin H. MacCormick Island Academy at Rikers Island:                        Mathematics Teachers (2006-2008)
    • The Institute for the Advancement of Mathematics Education:                                Middle & High School Mathematics Supervisors (2005-2006)
    Review of Journal Manuscripts, Conference Research Papers, & Conference Proposals:
    • Journal of Mathematical Behavior (Elsevier)
    • Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School (NCTM)
    • Teaching Children Mathematics (NCTM) 
    • Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators (AMTE)
    • International Community of Teachers of Mathematical Modelling and Applications (ICTMA)
    • International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, North American Chapter (PME-NA)

    Professional Associations

    Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators (AMTE)

    International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, North American Chapter (PME-NA) 

    National Association of Professors of Middle Level Education (NaPOMLE)  

    National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM)  

    National Middle School Association (NMSA)  

    Phi Delta Kappa International (PDK)  

    Special Interest Group of the Mathematical Association of America / Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education (SIG/RUME)

    Office Hours

    Tuesdays and Thursdays: 3:30 - 4:30 & additional hours by appointment

     

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