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Special Education

Courses

Required Courses

http://www.ccny.cuny.edu/specialed/required_courses.cfm

Course Descriptions

Course descriptions for the following Special Education Programs:

Special Education Childhood Education Program (Grades 1-6)
Special Education Adolescent Education Program (Grades 7-12)
Course Descriptions for Other Related Courses

 

Course Descriptions

Special Education Childhood Education Program (Grades 1-6)

In departmental and numerical order:

EDCE 5400C Methods of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages I (Grade PreK-6; 3 credits)Methods and materials for teaching English to non-native speakers grades K-6, with a focus on communicative content-based instruction; appropriateness of various techniques, resources, and assessments for different learning styles, language and cultural backgrounds, age and proficiency levels, including gifted and talented students and those with special developmental needs; history of ESOL teaching, and the links between teaching practice and theories of language and language learning. The course includes attention to theories and practices involved in the teaching of ESOL by means of instruction in the content areas of mathematics, science and technology, social studies, and the arts. 3 HR./WK., PLUS 10 HRS. OF FIELDWORK; 3 CR.

EDLS 0701G: Internship in Special Education I: Childhood Education
Students will be assigned to a school and spend half a semester in a special education or inclusion classroom, grades 1-3, and half a semester in a special education or inclusion classroom, grade 4-6. Minimum of 15 hours per week, 3 credits equivalent to 12 semester hours for 240 hour (40 day) minimum. There is a scheduled weekly seminar. 3 CR.

Note. Register for EDLS 0701G: Internship in Special Education I: Middle Childhood Education, if you are enrolled in the Adolescent Program (Grades 7-12). If you are currently teaching, register for EDLS 5700G.

EDLS 2600I: Content Research Seminar in Special Education
A critical review of the research literature in the candidate’s major interest, as well as appropriate research methodology and instrumentation. The first semester covers the basic concepts needed to evaluate research critically. Each student will identify a research problem, review literature related to that problem, and design a project to study it. The study will be carried out during the second semester. This course should be taken no later than the semester prior to the one in which the student expects to complete the requirements for the degree. 2 HR./WK.; 2 CR.

EDLS 2900I: Seminar in Educational Research
Second semester of the research sequence. Students carry out their study design in the Content Research Seminar and learn how to analyze, write about, and present the data collected. By permission only. 2 HR./WK.; 2 CR.

EDLS 3300K: Building Community in Inclusive Contexts
Children come to school as unique learners who negotiate the world within complex and ever-shifting intersectional ties of race, class, gender, and ability. This course prepares teacher candidates to conceptualize human diversity as a resource (rather than a liability) and to facilitate caring classroom communities within which all learners are viewed as valuable. Participants will acquire in-depth understanding of techniques that nurture the development of an interdependent learning community based upon trust, mutual respect, and acceptance. Issues specific to classroom dynamics and access are considered in the instance of physical setting, curriculum, and teaching strategies as each relates to building community in the classroom. In addition, community building in the larger school context (including strategies for initiating and sustaining school change) will be addressed as well as transition issues that bridge to the outside community (community-based inclusion). Attention will be given to language arts, mathematics, science, social studies, and technology as appropriate and consistent with the N.Y. State Learning Standards. 3 HR./WK.; 3 CR.

EDLS 3600K: Approaches to Literacy I in Childhood Education
This course is the first in a two-part sequence designed to assist participants to make informed choices about how to structure classroom routines and rituals that maximize opportunities for teaching reading and writing in an integrated fashion. Various frameworks for lesson planning to complement the IEP will be introduced as well as exceptionality specific assessment instruments. Course content will address the essential components of reading, including: phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency and expressiveness, vocabulary, and comprehension. In conjunction with reading skills, methodologies of writing through a process approach will also be introduced (i.e., pre-writing, organization, writing a primary draft, multiple revisions, and final editing). 3 HR./WK., PLUS 15 HRS. OF FIELDWORK; 3 CR.

EDLS 3700K: Approaches to Literacy II in Childhood Education
This course (part II) is designed to extend the literacy components introduced in part I. Extended experiences will focus on maintaining a classroom structure that supports a reading-rich context in conjunction with writing-worthy opportunities for use in a variety of educational contexts. The course will feature strategies to teach habits of good readers, such as: activating schema, visualizing, questioning, determining importance, making inferences, monitoring for meaning, and synthesizing. In conjunction with explicit reading skills (part I), methodologies of writing will also be taught, focusing on the process of writing through: pre-writing, organization, writing a primary draft, multiple revisions, and final editing. The art of individual conferencing with students will be featured at length. 3 HR./WK., PLUS 15 HRS. OF FIELDWORK; 3 CR.

EDLS 3800K: Differentiated Instruction and Assessment in Collaborative Contexts I in Childhood Education
This course is the first in a two-part sequence designed to foster creative approaches to planning, implementation of instruction, and ongoing curriculum based/ authentic instruction for all children in a variety of educational settings. Participants will focus on understanding differences as a basis for planning; use diagnostic assessment in an ongoing manner to make instruction more responsive to learner need; utilize multiple forms of intelligence; assist students by frequently guiding them in making interest-based choices; use varied instructional arrangements; employ student readiness, interest, and learning profile in planning; develop multioption assignments; develop flexible use of timing; facilitate students becoming more self reliant learners; and implement multiple forms of assessment. Content specialists will inform the course activities in the areas of language arts, mathematics, science, social studies and technology (teaching modules) as per the Part 100 Regulation of the Commissioner of Education and the New York State Standards. Participants will utilize content modules and apply their acquired knowledge of assessment, differentiated instructional design and planning to the content areas studied. Regulatory requirements (Part 100 and Part 200 Rules and Regulations of the NYS Commissioner of Education) that focus on curriculum content, due process, assessment, programs and services are correlated to each of the topics covered during this course. 3 HR./WK., PLUS 15 HRS. OF FIELDWORK; 3 CR.

EDLS 3900K: Differentiated Instruction and Assessment in Collaborative Contexts II in Childhood Education
This course is the second part of a two-part sequence that extends the content addressed in Part I. Participants will focus on developing pedagogical flexibility within three broad, interconnected strands: The information to be taught (content specific to: language arts, mathematics, science, social studies, technology), how students engage with that information (process), and ways in which students demonstrate their knowledge as a result of interacting with information (product). Content areas are used to engage participants as per the Part 100 Regulation of the Commissioner of Education and the New York State Standards. Extending part I of the course, participants will elaborate on content-based modules and apply acquired knowledge of assessment, differentiated instructional design and planning to the content areas studied. In addition, regulatory requirements (Part 100 and Part 200 Rules and Regulations of the NYS Commissioner of Education) that focus on curriculum content, due process, assessment, programs and services are correlated to the topics covered during this course. 3 HR./WK., PLUS 15 HRS. OF FIELDWORK; 3 CR.

EDLS 5300K: Positive Approaches for Challenging Behaviors
This course is designed to assist participants to make informed choices about how to analyze a “behavior issue” in the classroom and school context. Participants will learn how to develop multiple positive approaches for extinguishing difficult behaviors. Traditional as well as alternative behavioral interventions will be considered including an overview of the traditional (i.e., controlling) behavioral approaches and practices typically used with students with intellectual or emotional disabilities. Readings and activities will encourage examination of the conceptual foundations and underlying principles of such approaches for use in an inclusive society. The central feature of this course, however, will be on interactive intervention alternatives that alleviate frustrations for students with disabilities, focus on their needs and wishes, and support them in taking control of their lives. The final project will require participants to apply an approach to the management of difficult behaviors they find most suitable in their classrooms. 3 HR./WK., PLUS 15–20 HRS. OF FIELDWORK; 3 CR.

EDLS 5700G: Practicum in Teaching Special Education
An advanced course to assess and develop teaching skills in various special education settings under supervision in the field and in an integrative seminar. Individual conferences to review teaching strategies, materials, and techniques. Department permission required. 3 HR./WK.; 3 CR.

EDLS 6100I: Working with Parents of Children with Disabilities
Understanding and valuing the perspective and knowledge of parents and families who raise children with disabilities forms the focus of this class. We will reflect upon our own assumptions about parents and families and consider positive reconceptualizations of family/school relationships. We explore how the “medical model of disability” inherent within the institution of special education disrupts effective communication between families and professionals. We will also explore the relational aspects of disability and extended family members. Attention will be paid to culturally responsive factors that promote effective communication and authentic collaboration with families as well as effective parent/family advocacy strategies. 3HR./WK.; 3 CR.

 

 

Course Descriptions

Special Education Adolescent Program (Grades 7-12)

In departmental and numerical order:

EDCE 6900C Methods of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages II (Grade 7- Adult; 3 credits)
Methods and materials for teaching English to non-native speakers grades 7-Adult, with a focus on communicative content-based instructions; appropriateness of various techniques, resources, and assessments for different learning styles, language and cultural backgrounds, age and proficiency levels, including gifted and talented students and those with special developmental needs; history of ESOL teaching, and the links between teaching practice and theories of language and language learning. The course includes attention to the specific discourse and text formats in the content areas of mathematics, science and technology, social studies, and the arts. 3 HR./WK., PLUS 10 HRS. OF FIELDWORK; 3 CR.

EDLS 0701G: Internship in Special Education I: Childhood Education
Students will be assigned to a school and spend half a semester in a special education or inclusion classroom, grades 1-3, and half a semester in a special education or inclusion classroom, grade 4-6. Minimum of 15 hours per week, 3 credits equivalent to 12 semester hours for 240 hour (40 day) minimum. There is a scheduled weekly seminar. 3 CR.

Note. Register for EDLS 0701G: Internship in Special Education I: Childhood Education, if you are enrolled in the Childhood Program (Grades 1-6). If you are currently teaching, register for EDLS 5700G.

EDLS 2600I: Content Research Seminar in Special Education
A critical review of the research literature in the candidate’s major interest, as well as appropriate research methodology and instrumentation. The first semester covers the basic concepts needed to evaluate research critically. Each student will identify a research problem, review literature related to that problem, and design a project to study it. The study will be carried out during the second semester. This course should be taken no later than the semester prior to the one in which the student expects to complete the requirements for the degree. 2 HR./WK.; 2 CR.

EDLS 2900I: Seminar in Educational Research
Second semester of the research sequence. Students carry out their study design in the Content Research Seminar and learn how to analyze, write about, and present the data collected. By permission only. 2 HR./WK.; 2 CR.

EDLS 3300K: Building Community in Inclusive Contexts
Children come to school as unique learners who negotiate the world within complex and ever-shifting intersectional ties of race, class, gender, and ability. This course prepares teacher candidates to conceptualize human diversity as a resource (rather than a liability) and to facilitate caring classroom communities within which all learners are viewed as valuable. Participants will acquire in-depth understanding of techniques that nurture the development of an interdependent learning community based upon trust, mutual respect, and acceptance. Issues specific to classroom dynamics and access are considered in the instance of physical setting, curriculum, and teaching strategies as each relates to building community in the classroom. In addition, community building in the larger school context (including strategies for initiating and sustaining school change) will be addressed as well as transition issues that bridge to the outside community (community-based inclusion). Attention will be given to language arts, mathematics, science, social studies, and technology as appropriate and consistent with the N.Y. State Learning Standards. 3 HR./WK.; 3 CR.

EDLS 3601K: Approaches to Literacy I for Teachers of Students with Disabilities in Grades 7-12
This course is the first in a two-part sequence designed to assist participants to make informed choices about how to structure classroom routines and rituals that maximize opportunities for teaching reading and writing in an integrated fashion to students with disabilities in grades 7-12. Various frameworks for lesson planning to complement the IEP will be introduced as well as exceptionality specific assessment instruments. Course content will address the essential components of reading, including: phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency and expressiveness, vocabulary, and comprehension. In conjunction with reading skills, methodologies of writing through a process approach will also be introduced (i.e., pre-writing, organization, writing a primary draft, multiple revisions, and final editing). Matriculation in students with disabilities graduate program required. 3 HR./WK., PLUS 15 HRS. OF FIELDWORK; 3 CR.

EDLS 3701K: Approaches to Literacy II for Teachers of Students with Disabilities in Grades 7-12
This course (part II) is designed to extend the literacy components introduced in part I. Extended experiences will focus on maintaining a classroom structure that supports a reading-rich context in conjunction with writing-worthy opportunities for use in a variety of educational contexts for students with disabilities in grades 7-12. The course will feature strategies to teach habits of good readers, such as: activating schema, visualizing, questioning, determining importance, making inferences, monitoring for meaning, and synthesizing. In conjunction with explicit reading skills (part I), methodologies of writing will also be taught, focusing on the process of writing through: pre-writing, organization, writing a primary draft, multiple revisions, and final editing. The art of individual conferencing with students will be featured at length. Matriculation in students with disabilities graduate program required. 3 HR./WK., PLUS 15 HRS. OF FIELDWORK; 3 CR.

EDLS 3801K: Differentiated Instruction and Assessment in Collaborative Contexts I for Teachers of Students with Disabilities in Grades 7-12
This course is the first in a two-part sequence designed to foster creative approaches to planning, implementation of instruction, ongoing curriculum based/authentic instruction for all children in a variety of educational settings for students with disabilities in grades 7-12. Participants will focus on understanding differences as a basis for planning; use diagnostic assessment in an ongoing manner to make instruction more responsive to learner need; utilize multiple forms of intelligence; assist students by frequently guiding them in making interest-based choices; use varied instructional arrangements; employ student readiness, interest, and learning profile in planning; develop multi-option assignments; develop flexible use of timing; facilitate students becoming more self reliant learners; and implement multiple forms of assessment. Content specialists will inform the course activities in the areas of language arts, mathematics, science, social studies and technology (teaching modules) as per the Part 100 Regulation of the Commissioner of Education and the New York State Standards. Participants will utilize content modules and apply their acquired knowledge of assessment, differentiated instructional design and planning to the content areas studied. Regulatory requirements (Part 100 and Part 200 Rules and Regulations of the NYS Commissioner of Education) that focus on curriculum content, due process, assessment, programs and services are correlated to each of the topics covered during this course. Matriculation in students with disabilities graduate program required. 3 HR./WK., PLUS 15 HRS. OF FIELDWORK; 3 CR.

EDLS 3901K: Differentiated Instruction and Assessment in Collaborative Contexts II for Teachers of Students with Disabilities in Grades 7-12
This course is the second part of a two-part sequence for teachers of students with disabilities in grades 7-12 that extends the content addressed in Part I. Participants will focus on developing pedagogical flexibility within three broad, interconnected strands: The information to be taught (content specific to: language arts, mathematics, science, social studies, technology), how students engage with that information (process), and ways in which students demonstrate their knowledge as a result of interacting with information (product). Content areas are used to engage participants as per the Part 100 Regulation of the Commissioner of Education and the New York State Standards. Extending part I of the course, participants will elaborate on content-based modules and apply acquired knowledge of assessment, differentiated instructional design and planning to the content areas studied. In addition, regulatory requirements (Part 100 and Part 200 Rules and Regulations of the NYS Commissioner of Education) that focus on curriculum content, due process, assessment, programs and services are correlated to the topics covered during this course. Matriculation in students with disabilities graduate program required. 3 HR./WK., PLUS 15 HRS. OF FIELDWORK; 3 CR.

EDLS 5300K: Positive Approaches for Challenging Behaviors
This course is designed to assist participants to make informed choices about how to analyze a “behavior issue” in the classroom and school context. Participants will learn how to develop multiple positive approaches for extinguishing difficult behaviors. Traditional as well as alternative behavioral interventions will be considered including an overview of the traditional (i.e., controlling) behavioral approaches and practices typically used with students with intellectual or emotional disabilities. Readings and activities will encourage examination of the conceptual foundations and underlying principles of such approaches for use in an inclusive society. The central feature of this course, however, will be on interactive intervention alternatives that alleviate frustrations for students with disabilities, focus on their needs and wishes, and support them in taking control of their lives. The final project will require participants to apply an approach to the management of difficult behaviors they find most suitable in their classrooms. 3 HR./WK., PLUS 15–20 HRS. OF FIELDWORK.

EDLS 5700G: Practicum in Teaching Special Education
An advanced course to assess and develop teaching skills in various special education settings under supervision in the field and in an integrative seminar. Individual conferences to review teaching strategies, materials, and techniques. Department permission required. 3 HR./WK.; 3 CR.

EDLS 6100I: Working with Parents of Children with Disabilities
Understanding and valuing the perspective and knowledge of parents and families who raise children with disabilities forms the focus of this class. We will reflect upon our own assumptions about parents and families and consider positive reconceptualizations of family/school relationships. We explore how the “medical model of disability” inherent within the institution of special education disrupts effective communication between families and professionals. We will also explore the relational aspects of disability and extended family members. Attention will be paid to culturally responsive factors that promote effective communication and authentic collaboration with families as well as effective parent/family advocacy strategies. 3 HR./WK.; 3 CR.


Course Descriptions for Other Related Courses

In departmental and numerical order:

EDLS 5000K: Introduction to Inclusive Education
An introduction to the multiple meanings of inclusive education as employed in both national and international contexts. Specific attention is paid to school structure, legislative mandates in support of inclusive education, collaborative problem solving relationships among educators (general and special), students and families in designing and modeling inclusive pedagogies and practices for diverse learners. Historical contexts, shifting societal beliefs and practices for diverse learners and subsequent educational theories that have led to an increased emphasis on inclusion and the merits of collaborative education to serve students with disabilities in more integrated contexts will be examined. The following areas of study will be included: categories of disabilities, identification and remediation of disabilities, the special education process and state and federal special education laws and regulations (e.g. least restrictive environment, assistive technologies); effective practices for planning and designing co-teaching and collaboration with peers; individualizing instruction; and applying positive behavioral supports and interventions to address student and classroom management needs. Includes 15 hours of fieldwork for all candidates. Pre-requisite: Matriculation in a School of Education Program 3HR/WK; 3CR.

EDUC 0000I: Introduction to Educational Research
The first semester of the research sequence covers the basic concepts needed to evaluate research critically and plan it effectively. Each student will identify a problem in his or her major area, review the literature related to the problem, and design a project to study the problem. The study will be carried out during the second semester. This course should be taken no later than the semester prior to the one in which the student expects to complete the requirements for the degree. 2 HR./WK.; 2 CR.

EDUC 0100A: Urban Schools in a Diverse Society
Selected significant social, political and economic forces which influence the school as an institution and which in turn are influenced by the school, especially in urban settings that educate students from diverse ethnic and cultural backgrounds. Includes history, philosophy, sociology and politics of education. Includes 10 hours of fieldwork at either the 1-3 or 4-6 grade levels. 3 HR./WK.; 3 CR.

EDUC 0100I: Individual Study in Educational Research
Second semester of research sequence. Consideration of research design, sampling, instrumentation, data collection, statistical or quantitative data presentation. Students will execute the study developed during the first semester and prepare a written report, in research form, of the complete study. Prereq.: EDUC 0000I. 2 HR./WK.; 2 CR.

EDUC 0200A: Psychology of Learning and Teaching
The course includes theories and principles of learning and instruction pertinent to achievement, development, self-regulation, and behavior in children from culturally and ethnically-diverse backgrounds. Includes classroom applications, testing and evaluation. Includes 10-15 hours of fieldwork at either the 1-3 or 4-6 grade levels. 3 HR./WK.; 3 CR.

EDUC 0300A: Child Development (for grades 1-6 candidates)
Theories and principles of development pertinent to culturally and ethnically- diverse and inclusive classrooms with an emphasis on classroom applications and fieldwork. Includes 10-15 hours of field- work at either the 1-3 or 4-6 grade levels. 3 HR./WK.; 3 CR.

EDUC 0500A: Adolescent Learning and Development (for grades 7-12 candidates)
The evolution of how theories and research on learning and development manifest themselves in urban settings for teachers of adolescents. Teacher-centered and student-centered, human and technology- based approaches, emphasizing those promoting independent, self-regulated-adolescent learners. Theories, their cultural implications and their classroom applications: learning, intelligence, motivation, affect, parenting styles, classroom communication, and classroom management strategies. Includes 15 hours of fieldwork. 3 HR./WK.; 3 CR.