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Honorary Degree Recipients

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Honorary Degree Recipients

David Diaz

Honorary Degree (Doctor of Humane Letters)

A 1965 City College alumnus, Diaz spent 27 years as a reporter at WNBC/Channel 4 and WCBS/Channel 2 in New York. His brilliant coverage of both city news and national events such as the Oklahoma bombing, the 9/11 World Trade Center and presidential elections earned him numerous awards for journalism excellence. Diaz received five Emmy Awards, two Sigma Delta Chi Awards and an Associated Press Award. He has served as Distinguished Lecturer at CCNY.

Dr. Robert E. Kahn

Honorary Degree (Doctor of Science)

The 1960 CCNY alumnus initiated the U.S. government's Internet program and is co-creator with Vinton Cerf of the TCP/IP protocols, the fundamental technology underpinning the Internet. In his recent work, Kahn has been developing the concept of a Digital Object Architecture to provide a framework for interoperability across heterogeneous information systems. His numerous awards include the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the National Medal of Technology, the Japan Prize, the Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering and the A.M. Turing Award. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the National Academy of Sciences, and an inductee into the Inventors Hall of Fame and the Internet Hall of Fame. Kahn is President and CEO of the Corporation for National Research Initiatives, a non-profit organization focused on research and development for the national information infrastructure.

Deborah Meier

Honorary Degree (Doctor of Humane Letters)

Public educator, writer and advocate since the early 1960s, Meier is one of the most acclaimed leaders of the school reform movement in the U.S. She founded the acclaimed Central Park East Schools and helped revitalize public schools in New York City's East Harlem District 4. Meier also founded Mission Hill, a K-8 school in Roxbury, MA, and helped establish the Coalition of Essential Schools. Her books include "The Power of Their Ideas, Lessons to America from a Small School in Harlem" and "In Schools we Trust." She received a MacArthur "genius" Award for her work in public education.