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Fall 2017 Undergraduate and Graduate

History
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Fall 2017 Undergraduate and Graduate

 

HISTORY DEPARTENT UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

 

HISTORICAL METHODS

21300 – The Historian’s Craft (Class-24238/Section-C)

The course introduces students to the study of history. It offers an intensive introduction to historical writing and research, and to the principles and methods of historical analysis. Students will learn about the historical craft as well as gain critical skills that are useful in any discipline or endeavor where research and writing are essential. This course is required for all history majors.

M/W  11:00am-12:15pm                             NAC4/148                                         Barbara Naddeo

 

21300 – The Historians Craft (Class-24269/Section-P)

The course introduces students to the study of history. It offers an intensive introduction to historical writing and research, and to the principles and methods of historical analysis. Students will learn about the historical craft as well as gain critical skills that are useful in any discipline or endeavor where research and writing are essential. This course is required for all history majors.

T/TH  2:00pm-3:15pm                               NAC5/142                                         John Blanton

 

EUROPE

20400 – Early-Modern Europe (Class-24240/Section-C)

An overview of European history from the resurgence of urban life and classical culture during the Renaissance to the Trials and tribulations of the French Revolution.

M/W  11:00am-12:15pm                             Shepard 75                                      Edward Barnet

 

20400 – Early-Modern Europe (Class-24241/Section-D)

An overview of European history from the resurgence of urban life and classical culture during the Renaissance to the Trials and tribulations of the French Revolution.

M/W  12:30pm-1:45pm                               NAC6/213                                         Barbara Naddeo

 

20600 – Modern Europe (Class-24248/Section-E)

An overview of the social, economic, political, and intellectual developments in Europe from the Enlightenment to the present, and an introduction to the study of history. Topics include  the problems of revolution, industrialization and the transformation of rural societies, the emergence of liberalism and the challenges it has faced in the twentieth century.

M/W  2:00pm-3:15pm                                 NAC7/231                                         James Lewis

 

20600 – Modern Europe (Class-24250/Section-F)

An overview of the social, economic, political, and intellectual developments in Europe from the Enlightenment to the present, and an introduction to the study of history. Topics include  the problems of revolution, industrialization and the transformation of rural societies, the emergence of liberalism and the challenges it has faced in the twentieth century.

M/W  3:30pm-4:45pm                                 NAC5/101                                         James Lewis

 

20600 – Modern Europe (Class-24253/Section-L)

An overview of the social, economic, political, and intellectual developments in Europe from the Enlightenment to the present, and an introduction to the study of history. Topics include  the problems of revolution, industrialization and the transformation of rural societies, the emergence of liberalism and the challenges it has faced in the twentieth century.

T/TH  9:30am-10:45am                              NAC5/124                                         Barbara Syrrakos

 

20600 – Modern Europe (Class-24253/Section-P)

An overview of the social, economic, political, and intellectual developments in Europe from the Enlightenment to the present, and an introduction to the study of history. Topics include  the problems of revolution, industrialization and the transformation of rural societies, the emergence of liberalism and the challenges it has faced in the twentieth century.

T/TH  2:00pm-3:15pm                               NAC7/227                                         Barbara Syrrakos

 

20601 – Modern Europe (Honors) (Class-24260/Section-HNRS)

An overview of the social, economic, political, and intellectual developments in Europe from the Enlightenment to the present, and an introduction to the study of history. Topics include the problems of revolution, industrialization and the transformation of rural societies, the emergence of liberalism and the challenges it has faced in the twentieth century.

T/TH  11:00am-12:15pm                           NAC5/142                                         Andreas Killen

 

32850 – The French Revolution (Class-24239/Section-C)

A thorough introduction to the French Revolution – one of the defining events of modern times, and the crucible in which key elements of modern politics were forged or redefined: universal manhood suffrage, human rights, civil equality, direct democracy, ideological dictatorship, nationalism, women’s liberation, and revolution itself.

M/W  11:00am-12:15pm                             Shepard 22                                      Clifford Rosenberg

 

32900 – Twentieth-Century Europe (Class-24243/Section-E)

What’s Freud got to do with feminism? Or Horkheimer with Hitler, Christian Democracy with the European Union, or colonial independence movements in Africa and Asia with radical student politics in Paris and Prague? You’ll find the answers to these and other questions in this course, which covers Europe during the First World War, the Russian Revolution, the rise of Fascism and Nazism, the Second World War, and their aftermath. You’ll read what the men and women who shaped the 20th century had to say about it. And you’ll learn what it means to evaluate their ideas and actions from a variety of perspectives.

M/W  2:00pm-3:15pm                                 Shepard S-208                                Clifford Rosenberg

 

34900 – The Third Reich (Class-24278/Section-S)

An introduction to the history National Socialism. Topics will include the crisis of Weimar Germany, the origins, structure, and evolution of the Nazi regime, Hitler, and the Hitler myth, Nazi culture, the Nazi “new order” in Europe, total war, and the implementation; of the final solution. Special attention will be given to the question of the memory of the Holocaust.

T/TH  2:00pm-3:15pm                               NAC5/124                                         Andreas Killen

 

35300 – Intellectual History of 20th Century Europe (Class-24252/Section-G)

Examines Europeans thought from the Enlightenment and its ideological offspring—19th Century liberalism and socialism – to the critique of the Enlightenment, beginning with Nietzsche and culminating in late 20th Century post-structuralism.

M/W  5:00pm-6:15pm                                 NAC6/114                                         James Lewis

 

 

UNITED STATES

 

24000 – The United States: From its Origins to 1877 (Class-57220/Section-B)

The major theological and social conflicts of 17th century English colonies; the political and ideological process that defined an American identity; the social and economic forces that shaped the early Republic; the nature of the regional conflicts that culminated in civil war.

M/W  9:30am-10:45am                               NAC6/328                                         Alexander Gambaccini

 

24000 – The United States: From its Origins to 1877 (Class-63438/Section-B2)

The major theological and social conflicts of 17th century English colonies; the political and ideological process that defined an American identity; the social and economic forces that shaped the early Republic; the nature of the regional conflicts that culminated in civil war.

M/W  9:30am-10:45am                               NAC4/161                                         Hidetaka Hirota

 

24000 – The United States: From its Origins to 1877 (Class-24242/Section-D)

The major theological and social conflicts of 17th century English colonies; the political and ideological process that defined an American identity; the social and economic forces that shaped the early Republic; the nature of the regional conflicts that culminated in civil war.

M/W  12:30pm-1:45pm                               NAC6/313                                         Hidetaka Hirota

 

24000 – The United States: From its Origins to 1877 (Class-24256/Section-L)

The major theological and social conflicts of 17th century English colonies; the political and ideological process that defined an American identity; the social and economic forces that shaped the early Republic; the nature of the regional conflicts that culminated in civil war.

T/TH  11:00am-12:15pm                           NAC5/101                                         John Blanton

 

24100 – The United States: Since 1865 (Class-24279/Section-5BC)

Examines the social conflicts that accompanied the transformation the U.S. from an agrarian republic and slave society to one of the most powerful industrial nations in the world. Particular attention will be paid to the building of new social and economic institutions and to cultural and visual representations of the nation and its people.

F  9:00am-11:50am                                     NAC5/101                                         John Gillooly

 

24100 – The United States: Since 1865 (Class-24245/Section-C)

Examines the social conflicts that accompanied the transformation the U.S. from an agrarian republic and slave society to one of the most powerful industrial nations in the world. Particular attention will be paid to the building of new social and economic institutions and to cultural and visual representations of the nation and its people.

M/W  11:00am-12:15pm                             NAC5/101                                         Matthew Vaz

 

 

 

 

 

31088 – History of U.S. Immigration (Class-24249/Section-F)

This course surveys events and issues that shaped American immigration history from the colonial period to the present. It explores the causes and patterns of migration to America; the processes of settlement; the development of American citizenship; nativism and regulatory immigration law; migrant identity and transnationalism; and major scholarly concepts such as ethnicity and assimilation. The course also examines the debate over immigration in contemporary American society and politics.

M/W  3:30pm-4:45pm                                 NAC5/123                                         Hidetaka Hirota

 

31089 – African-American Cultural & Political History: 1915-1945 (Class-24273/Section-R)

Throughout the 20th century, African Americans have employed a variety of strategies toward the attainment of social, political, and economic equality. At different historical moments, specific agenda, tactics, and participants have come to forefront, yet the overall objectives remain the same. During the 1920s & 1930s, many African Americans put forth a fusion of cultural and political activism as the vanguard of the movement. This course will look beyond traditional literary models and present students with a deeper and more complete understanding of the complex and dynamic social, cultural, and political phenomenon knowns as the New Negro or Harlem Renaissance. We will explore the intersection between culture and politics during a specific moment in African-American history and examine its place with the larger struggle for equality. The key themes the course will address are Agency, Resistance, Self-determination, Citizenship, Political Activism, Gender, Sexuality, Color, Tactics, and civil Rights. 

T/TH  3:30pm-4:45pm                               NAC5/148                                         Laurie Woodard

 

31165 – Crime & Policing in America (Class-24251/Section-F)

This course will examine the social and economic dynamics of crime in the United States during the 20th century. It will also explore politics and public policy related to policing and the courts, and it will situate the history of crime and policing within public discourses related to race, ethnicity, class, rights and justice.

M/W  3:30pm-4:45pm                                 Shepard S-203                                Matthew Vaz

 

31346 – U.S. Civil Rights Movement (Class-61886/Section-R)

The course will analyze the black freedom struggle and its impact on U.S. society, focused on the years 1945-1972. Topics include: urbanization and migration; strategic debates within the movement; the Cold War context and anti-colonialism; the role of leadership; and the transition to Black Power.

T/TH  3:30pm-4:45pm                               NAC5/109                                         Thea Hunter

 

32300 – New Nation, Free and Slave (Class-24237/Section-B)

Republicanism and the democratization of politics, industrialization of an American working class, social reform and the making of the middle class, westward expansion and the removal of the Native Americans, sectional conflict and slave culture.

M/W  9:30am-10:45am                               NAC4/161                                         Hidetaka Hirota

 

HIST 32400: The Era of Civil War and Reconstruction, 1840-1877 (Class-54710/Section-M)

The causes and consequences of the American Civil War, focusing on the reasons for sectional conflict, emancipation, the role of Abraham Lincoln, the conflict over Reconstruction and the new status of emancipated slaves.

T/TH  11:00am-12:15pm                           Shepard S-208                                Thea Hunter

 

32600 – The U.S. from 1914-1945 (Class-24254/Section-L)

America and WWI, the Roaring Twenties, the Depression, and the New Deal, Roosevelt’s leadership, WWII, and the beginnings of the Cold War.

T/TH  9:30am-10:45am                              NAC5/123                                         John Gillooly

 

32700 – The U.S. Since 1945 (Class-24236/Section-B)

The course will analyze the main political, social, and economic events shaping the United States during this period and try to explain the key political/economic change during these years: The transformation of a country employing an activist Keynesian economic policy and belief in government action to rectify social and economic ills to one espousing market or neo-liberal principles.

M/W  9:30am-10:45am                               NAC5/123                                         John Gillooly

 

47700 – The Vietnam War and U.S. Society (Class-24275/Section-R)

The Vietnam War presented in two ways: first, as several wars within Vietnam, including civil, revolutionary, and anti-colonial; second, as a war between the U.S. and Vietnam and its resulting conflicts within the U.S.

T/TH  3:30pm-4:45pm                               NAC6/122                                         Craig Daigle

 

 

LATIN AMERICA

 

31195 - Dominican Heritage: Trujillo to the Present (Class-54553/Section-M)

An in-depth study of the socio-cultural and historical realities of the Dominican Republic from 1930 to the Present. The course will also cover the Dominican migration and the growth of the Dominican community in the United States.

T/TH 9:30am-10:45am                               NAC4/115                                         Anthony Stevens                                                              

 

AFRICA

 

21003 – Africa Before 1500 (Class-24258/Section-M)

The African continent is home to the longest history of human experiences. We will consider the diversity of political, social, and cultural forms in African history from the time of early humans to 1500 CE. Among other civilizations, we will explore Axum, Nubia, Jenne-jeno, Ile-Ife, central African rainforest societies, Swahili towns, and Great Zimbabwe. Throughout the course, we will discuss how factors of mobility, technological innovation, environmental management, and cross-cultural interaction have shaped African history. The course also highlights African connections to the wider world across the Sahara and throughout the Atlantic and Indian oceans.

T/TH  11:00am-12:15pm                           Shepard 17                                      Andrea Seligman

 

 

MIDDLE EAST

 

31448 – Social & Political History of the Middle East (Class-24270/Section-P)

This course covers the history of the Middle East in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Its geographical focus will be Istanbul and the Arab territories of the Ottoman Empire (in particular Egypt and Greater Syria), as well as parts of Qajar Iran. Major themes will include reform and social protest; colonialism and nationalism; political legitimation; and inter-communal relations. We will also cover topics related to gender and the law, the family, nomadism, and social welfare. The course aims to introduce students to new approaches to the study of the Middle East, and to build a solid foundation for understanding the significance of social and political developments in this period for the later history of the region.

T/TH   2:00pm-3:15pm                              NAC6/213                                         Lale Can

 

 

 

ASIA

 

25100-Traditional China (Class-24274/Section-R)

The early formation of the Chinese state, the intellectual foundation that has sustained its long history, the shaping of the Confucian way of life, and the cultural sophistication and its decline on the eve of the modern world.

T/TH   3:30pm-4:45pm                              NAC4/157                                         Danian Hu

 

46400 – Science and Technology in China (Class-24277/Section-S)

A survey of the scientific and technological developments in China from ancient times to the present. The course covers not only the great Chinese inventions and the decline of Chinese science and technology and its consequences, but also more recent achievements and their relation to developments elsewhere in Asia and around the world.

T/TH   5:00pm-6:15pm                              NAC7/227                                         Danian Hu 

 

47000 – Religions of India (Class-24244/Section-D)

This course will explore the many religious traditions of India, including the dominant Hinduism, along with Buddhism, Jainism, Islam, Sikhism, and Zoroastrianism. Central themes include the origins of each religious tradition; the philosophical underpinnings and the historical growth of each religion; and the social and political conflict/accommodation of multiple religious traditions in modern India.

M/W   12:30pm-1:45pm                              NAC6/311                                         Ravi Kalia

 

 

 

HISTORY GRADUATE COURSES

 

 

B0000 – Historical Methods and Historiography (Class-24281/Section-1HJ)

This course focuses on the ideas and methods that have shaped the conceptualization and writing of professional history over the past few decades. Methods studied may include those of Marxists, the French Annales school, social-scientific history, gender history, cultural history, global and transnational history, microhistory, environmental history, and historical sociology. Area readings will vary with instructor. (Required for all B.A./M.A. and M.A students.)

M  7:00pm-9:00pm                                                    NAC5/142                               Anne Kornhauser

 

B0903 – Era of Détente (Class-24285/Section-4ST)

This is research seminar on the Era of Détente, the period within the Cold War marked by a prolonged absence of military conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union. Students will spend the bulk of the semester writing a primary-based research paper on one aspect of Détente. The course will also attempt to define Détente and evaluate its policy implications. Students will study the origins of dente and its evolution over time and in different international contexts. The course will begin examining early efforts at Détente in the late 1960s, continue through the successes of the Nixon administration and the challenges faced by Presidents Ford and Carter and finish with the advent of the “new Cold War” in the first years of Reagan’s presidency.

TH   4:50pm-6:50pm                                                 NAC5/142                               Craig Daigle

 

B8005 – Islamic History in the Age of Imperialism (Class-24281/Section-4ST)

This course covers a pivotal era in the 19th and 20th centuries when imperialism, both formal and informal, extended across parts of the Middle East, North Africa, and South Asia. Two major events in world history frame the course: the 1869 opening of the Suez Canal, which ushered in a new phase of globalization and geopolitics; and the first World War, which created a new political order across much of the Islamic world. Key themes include the impact of the revolution in steam and print; local responses to imperialism; nationality and citizenship; Islamic politics; colonial legacies, and trans-regional mobility of people, ideas, and political movements.

T   4:50pm-6:50pm                                                    NAC5/142                               Lale Can

 

B8006 – Cold War to War on Terror (Class-24284/Section-3FG)

Are there parallels between the current “war on terrorism” and the Cold War; and what experiences from the Cold War can be applied to the current “war on terror.” How is one informed by the other? And how have the two conflicts undermined the Wilsonian ideals and democracy?

W   4:50pm-6:50pm                                                   NAC5/142                               Ravi Kalia

 

B8007 – African-American Cultural History: Theory and Methods (Class-24283/Section-2TU)

This graduate seminar invites students to delve into the historiography, theory, criticism, discourse, key arguments and methods within the historical study of the New Negro or Harlem Renaissance. We will delve into the movement from a variety of perspectives including cultural studies, critical race theory, biography, black feminism, and Marxism. Through this exploration, students will gain a deep understanding of the complexity of this multifaceted movement and the myriad approaches of deriving meaning from it.

T   7:00pm-9:00pm                                                    NAC5/142                               Laurie Woodard