Share This
History

Fall 2013 Courses

Undergraduate Courses

EUROPE

20400  (4362)  Early Modern Europe
An overview of European history from the resurgence of urban life and classical culture during the Renaissance to the trials and tribulations of the French Revolution.
TTH 2:00-3:15pm            Barbara Naddeo

20600 Modern Europe
An overview of social, economic, political, and intellectual developments in Europe from the Enlightenment to the present, and an introduction to the study of history. Topics include the problems of revolution, industrialization and the transformation of rural societies, the emergence of liberalism and the challenges it has faced in the 20th century.
MW 11:00am-12:15pm (4363)   Barbara Syrrakos
MW 5:00-6:15pm (4364)   James Lewis

31163 (3536) The European Union
The European Union is the largest democratically conceived confederation of sovereign states in human history, directly affecting a half billion persons. How has this come to pass, and how does it fare? We will examine earlier examples of union, analyze the nature and origins of the EU, and explore its mechanics and policies. Texts are historical, analytical, theoretical and archival, including two comprehensive web-based history and policy archives and a foundational myth.
MW 3:30-4:45pm             Barbara Syrrakos

31420 M (3554)  Psychiatry, Madness & Society
Examines social, cultural, intellectual and institutional aspects of the history of madness in Europe since 1789. The course will begin with the age of the so-called “Great Confinement,” then move on to consider the institutional and therapeutic reforms of the revolutionary and post-revolutionary era; the rise of theories of degeneration, hysteria and neurasthenia in the second half of the 19th century; psychoanalysis and sexology; war neurosis and military psychiatry; psychiatry under the Nazis. It will conclude by looking at the anti-psychiatry movement on the 1960s and the new biological psychiatry of the 1980s and 1990s.
TTH 11:00am-12:15pm        Andreas Killen

32900 E (4371) 20th Century Europe
What’s Freud got to do with feminism? Or Horkheimer with Hitler, Christian Democracy with the European Union, or colonial independence movements in Africa and Asia with radical student politics in Paris and Prague? You’ll find the answers to these and other questions in this course, which covers Europe during the Frist World War, the Russian Revolution, the rise of Fascism and Nazism, the Second World War, and their aftermath. You’ll read what the men and women who shaped the 20th Century had to say about it. And you’ll learn what it means to evaluate their ideas and actions from a variety of perspectives.
MW 2:00-3:15pm            James Lewis

32950 M (4372) Soviet History
A survey and analysis of the Soviet Union from its establishment in 1917 amid world war and revolution to its collapse in 1991. Starting with the essentials of Marxist ideology and a brief overview of the Russian Empire, the course examines the causes of the Russian Revolution, state-building in the socialist polity; social engineering through forced collectivization, industrialization, and cultural transformation; terror in concept and practice; nationality policies in a multi-ethnic socialist union; the emergence of the Soviet superpower and its role in the Cold War; and decline and collapse of the Soviet empire.
TTH 11:00am-12:15pm        Emily Greble

42400 E (3548) The Great War
A comprehensive overview of World War I. Central themes include the origins of the conflict, both long-and short-term; the nature of industrial killing; the growth of the state, of mass armies, of economic regulation; and the revolutionary movements that the prolonged war effort spawned.
MW 2:00-3:15pm            Clifford Rosenberg

UNITED STATES

24000  (4365)  US History to 1865
The major theological and social conflicts of 17th century English colonies; the political and ideological process that defined an American identity; the social and economic forces that shaped the early republic; the nature of the civil war.
MW 9:30-10:45am            Richard Boles

24100 (4366) US Since 1865
Examines the social conflicts that accompanied the transformation of the United States from an agrarian republic and slave society to one of the most powerful industrial nations in the world. Particular attention will be paid to the building of new social and economic institutions and to cultural and visual representations of the nation and its people.
MW 11:00am-12:15pm        Matthew Vaz

31118 (3533) Workers Fact-Fiction-Film
Popular film, documentaries, novels and other literary sources about working people will be explored to study strikes, class discrimination, race and ethnic conflict, labor politics and organization. The portrayal of the working classes during the World Wars, The Great Depressions, the Cold War and the current period of workplace globalization are the focus.
MW 8:00am-9:15am        Venus Green

31447 (3567) Era of Détente

This is research seminar on the Era of Détente, the period with the Cold War marked by a prolonged absence of military conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union. Students will spend the bulk of the semester writing a primary-based research paper on one aspect of Détente. The course will also attempt to define Détente and evaluate its policy implications. Students will study the origins of Détente and its evolution over time and in different international contexts. The course will begin examining early efforts at Détente in the late 1960s continue through the successes of the Nixon administration and the challenges faced by Presidents Ford and Carter and finish with the advent of the “new Cold War” in the first years of Reagan’s presidency.
TTH 3:30-4:45pm            Craig Daigle

32200  (3541)  American Revolution
This course details the causes, events, and consequences of one of the first and most important revolutionary movements of the Enlightenment. Particular attention is devoted to the social and political causes of the uprising, as well as its cultural meaning for the different participants in the American scene.
MW 12:30-1:45pm            Richard Boles

36300 (4375) African-American History to Emancipation
A survey of the sociocultural experiences of African peoples in the North American diaspora defining the historical, economic and political origins of the contemporary position of the Afro-American.
MW 9:30-10:45am            Venus Green

37000 (4376) American Legal History

This course will examine some key constitutional and legal conflicts in the 19th and 20th century United States in order to understand the role of law in American life and the social and cultural meaning of the law in American history
MW 3:30-4:45pm            Anne Kornhauser

44900 (4377) Power-Race-Culture US City
This course will introduce students to the interdisciplinary study of American culture through an examination of New York City-its history, literature and culture.
MW 2:00-3:15pm            Matthew Vaz

AFRICA, LATIN AMERICA,  MIDDLE EAST

27600 E (4368) Africa in Modern World
A social history of Africa from the 19th century to the present, with emphasis on state formation, impact of the slave trade, and resistance to colonialism.
MW 2:00-3:15pm            Jennifer Johnson Onyedum    

28000 F (4369) Latin America in Modern History

A broad historical introduction to Latin American and Caribbean development in the context of global history, focusing on colonialism, the Atlantic slave and sugar economies, revolution, nationalism, race and racism, topics economic modernization, migration/emigration, and social movements. The approach will be chronological and thematic, with particular attention to the influence of Latin American and Caribbean development beyond the borders of the continent.
MW 3:30-4:45pm            Gerardo Renique

28100  (4370) Colonial Latin America
A study of the impact and meaning of colonial rule in Latin America and the Caribbean, focusing on the interaction between European goals and institutions, and indigenous American and African strategies of socio-cultural survival.
TTH 11:00am-12:15pm        Susan Besse

31149 (3535) Ottoman Empire
This survey is a course of the Ottoman Empire from its roots as a Turkic principality in medieval Anatolia to its role as a world power in the 15th through early 20th centuries. In addition to covering the major contours of the history of  this vast multi-confessional and multi-ethnic empire, we will focus on the evolution of governmental, religious, and cultural institutions and the factors that contributed to the empire’s longevity. Topics will include political adaptation and innovation; inter-communal relations; the history of law, gender, and center-periphery relations; Ottoman relations with Europe; and the Ottoman legacy in the Modern Middle East and Balkans.
TTH 2:00-3:15PM            Lale Can

31448 S (3566) Social/Politics History of the Middle East
This course covers the history of the Middle East in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Its geographical focus will be Istanbul and the Arab territories of the Ottoman Empire (in particular Egypt and Greater Syria), as well as parts of Qajar Iran. Major themes will include reform and social protest; colonialism and nationalism; political legitimation; and inter-communal relations. We will also cover topics related to gender and the law, the family, nomadism, and social welfare. The course aims to introduce students to new approaches to the study of the Middle East, and to build a solid foundation for understanding the significance of social and political developments in this period for the later history of the region.
TTH 5:00-6:15pm            Lale Can

34450 (4374) Modern Middle East
This course will introduce students to the history of the Middle East, including the region from North Africa to Afghanistan, in the 19th and 20th centuries. Central themes include; modernizing attempts by the Ottoman and Qajar Empires in the fact of European encroachment; transition from empire to nation-state; the role of religion in politics; Arab nationalism; and the role of tribes and oil in state formation.
TTH 11:00am-12:15pm        Beth Baron

43100  (3560) History of Sexuality
This course examines how varying socio-political contexts and cultural systems have shaped people’s understandings and expressions of sexuality through history. Themes include: same-sex and trans-gendered sexualities; sexual implications of colonialism and racism; pornography; prostitution; rape; and reproductive sexualities.
TTH 2:00-3:15pm            Susan Besse

ASIA

25100 P (4367) Traditional China
The early formation of the Chinese state, the intellectual foundation that has sustained its long history, the shaping of the Confucian way of life, and the cultural sophistication and its decline on the eve of the modern world.
TTH 2:00-3:15pm            Danian Hu

31132 (3557) Great Partition: India & Pakistan
The course will explore the historiography of the partition of British India into two (and subsequently three—India, Pakistan, Bangladesh) nation-states. It will analyze the multiple scholarly positions that have sought to understand it, and even consider popular media representations of the event. This is a seminar course, with heavy emphasis on readings, discussions, and scholarly writing.
TF 12:30-1:45pm            Ravi Kalia

33350 (4373) 20th Century China

This survey course covers one of the most dramatic centuries of Chinese history, from the Boxer Uprising in 1900 to China’s reclamation of Macao—the last piece of territory lost to a Western power—in 1999. It will introduce to students major historical developments and figures in 20th century China. The objective is to help students to understand better how China becomes what she is now.
TTH 3:30-4:45pm            Danian Hu


Graduate Courses 

B0000 History Method Historiography   
This course will focus on the culture of colonialism. We will examine “the interpretive turn” in contemporary cultural history through our study of several exemplary texts. We will focus on the problem of “culture” and the “colonial/postcolonial”. Approaches to these topics include ethno-historians, labor history, literary scholars, “new historicists”, women’s studies, and cultural anthropology. This course required for all MA students. Closed to all Undergraduates Except 35F
T 4:50-6:30pm       Gregory Downs    NA5/142

B0115 American Legal History (code-3571)
This course will introduce students to the major problems and interpretations in the field of American legal history. We will examine a number of key constitutional and legal conflicts in the 19th and 20th century United States through theoretical and historiographical interpretations of those conflicts as well as by acquainting ourselves with a variety of primary sources (including cases, trial records, treatises and legal lives). The course seeks to understand the role of law in American life and the social and cultural meaning of the law in American history. How does the law affect people’s lives? How do we locate those effects? To what degree does the law have an existence separate from other large forces that determine relations of power and possibilities for action? Topics will include slave law; the role of law and economic development; the law of husband and wife; race and the Constitution; the emergence of civil rights and civil liberties, legal ethics, and the problem of regulation, among others.
Closed to all Undergraduates Except 35F
W 6:50-8:30pm         Anne Kornhauser    NA5/142

B0503 Topics in Latin American History Culture & Politics of Resistance in Latin America   (code-4379)
The main goal of this course is to historicize the most recent cycle of popular-indigenous rebelliousness marking the closing of the 20th century. We will begin with an examination of the interaction between collective memory and social mobilization and its connection to the major cycles of crisis marking post-colonial Latin American history. The course will examine the nature and trajectory of contemporary subaltern and indigenous movements through the discussion of their articulation of old and “new” political traditions. The course will also explore the incidence of popular political action in the current Latin American political crisis; the strategic importance of indigenous autonomous politics and demands for a pluri-ethnic state to the redefinition of both the national question and the problem of political democracy. Closed to all Undergraduates Except 35F
M 6:50-8:30pm  Gerardo Renique  

B0705 Histories of Decolonization in Africa
This course examines theories and case studies of decolonization in Africa throughout the 20th century. This course will focus on key concepts, such as self-determination, sovereignty, and revolutionary violence that influenced national liberation movements. By exploring a variety of strategies and cases, including Egypt, Algeria, and Kenya, students will gain an understanding of the myriad forms and complexities of decolonization.
W 4:50-6:30pm     Jennifer Johnson Onyedum  

B2222 Antebellum America    

The purpose of this class is to provide graduate students with a thorough introduction to the scholarly writing on the Antebellum era (1815-1861). Students enrolled in the course will examine themes such as slavery, immigration, westward expansion, manifest destiny, Jacksonian politics, labor, women, and sectional crisis that led to the outbreak of Civil War war. By the end of the semester, students will have both an excellent grounding in this crucial period in American history, and a familiarity with the important historiographic debates that define the student of the era.
TH 4:50-6:30pm    Craig Daigle  

B2908 20th Century China    
   
This survey course covers one of the most dramatic centuries of Chinese history, from the Boxer Uprising in 1900 to China’s reclamation of Macao—the last piece of territory lost to a Western power—in 1999. It will introduce to students major historical developments and figures in 20th century China. The objective is to help students to understand better how China becomes what she is now.
TH 6:50-8:30pm    Danian Hu  

B4306 Great War                   
A comprehensive overview of World War I. Central themes include the origins of the conflict, both long- and short-term; the nature of industrial killing; the growth of the state, of mass armies, of economic regulation; and the revolutionary movements that the prolonged war effort spawned.
Closed to all Undergraduates Except 35F
M 4:50-6:30pm      Clifford Rosenberg