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History

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One of the most popular programs on campus, history at the City College of New York has been crafted to meet the needs of the most voracious history scholar, as well as those students with an interest in a particular era or region.  The accomplished faculty has made its own mark in this arena both at the college and throughout the world and prepares students for a wide range of future careers and challenges.  Graduates not only represent City College at major higher educational institutions around the country but have gone on to successful careers in a wide range of legal, medical, entertainment, educational and other fields.

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Congratulations to Professor Beth Baron on the publication of her new book The Orphan Scandal: Christian Missionaries and the Rise of the Muslim Brotherhood. The book provides a new lens through which to view the rise of Islamic groups in Egypt. This fresh perspective offers a starting point to uncover hidden links between Islamic activists and a broad cadre of Protestant evangelicals. Exploring the historical aims of the Christian missions and the early efforts of the Muslim Brotherhood, Baron shows how the Muslim Brotherhood and like-minded Islamist associations developed alongside and in reaction to the influx of missionaries. Patterning their organization and social welfare projects on the early success of the Christian missions, the Brotherhood launched their own efforts to "save" children and provide for the orphaned, abandoned, and poor. In battling for Egypt's children, Islamic activists created a network of social welfare institutions and a template for social action across the country—the effects of which, we now know, would only gain power and influence across the country in the decades to come. To purchase a copy, click here.

Two CCNY History Students Identify Original Revolution Document

Letter drafted by Robert R. Livingston was part of 'last-ditch effort' by Continental Congress to reconcile with Great Britain

When City College of New York graduate history student Emilie Gruchow came upon an old, hand-written manuscript in a box at the Morris-Jumel Mansion, where she works as an archivist, she knew what it was because she had read the printed version in class. What she – and the rest of the world – did not know for certain was the author's identity. The mystery was solved by one of Ms. Gruchow's former classmates, Michael Hattem, now a PhD student and teaching fellow at Yale University. The story of the letter's discovery and author's identity as New Yorker Robert R. Livingston was reported New Year's Day in "The New York Times."

See full story here.