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Physics

Physics Department Current Events

 

Tuesday, October 14, 2014
Physics Majors Month
12:30 p.m., Marshak Science Building, Room 418N
Richard Steinberg
Professor, School or Education and Department of Physics, The City College of New York
"Making sense of how students make sense of physics"

 

Wednesday, October 15, 2014
Physics Colloquium
4:00 p.m., Marshak Science Building, Room 418N

Professor Arthur Kosowsky
University of Pittsburgh

"Inflationary Gravitational Radiation and Microwave Background Polarization"

We live in a universe whose properties are remarkably well described by a very early epoch of accelerating expansion, termed inflation. One generic prediction of inflation is a relic background of stochastic gravitational radiation. These tensor metric perturbations leave a distinctive imprint in the polarization of the microwave background. In March 2014, the BICEP experiment at the South Pole claimed the detection of this signal for the first time, although subsequent analysis has cast doubt on the extent to which polarized emission from dust in the Milky Way galaxy is contaminating the signal. I will review the current state of observations and give an overview of upcoming observational efforts which will definitively distinguish the cosmological and galactic signals.
If the BICEP signal has a significant component due to inflation, this opens the door to the remarkable possibility of detecting the gravitational radiation background directly with a space-based laser interferometer. Such a measurement would provide a precision probe of physics at energy scales a trillion times higher than those at terrestrial accelerators.


Thursday, October 16, 2014
Physics Majors Month
12:30 p.m., Marshak Science Building, Room 418N

Giovanni Milione
Ph.D. Student Physics, CUNY, (Mentor: Dist. Prof. Robert Alfano); National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow; NEC Laboratories America Inc.; Institute for Ultrafast Spectroscopy and Lasers, Physics Department, City College of New York of the City University of New York; Graduate Center of the City University of New York

Bio: Giovanni Milione is a United States Army veteran (Operation Iraqi Freedom) and a Physics PhD student in his last semester at the City College of New York under Distinguished Professor Robert R. Alfano. Giovanni is a winner of the prestigious National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, an SPIE Optics and Photonics scholarship, the National Academy of Science/USAID Research and Innovation fellowship, and winner of the inaugural Kaylie Entrepreneurship contest. Giovanni has published over 30 patents and papers in journals such as Physical Review Letters, has given over 30 national, international, and invited talks, and was co-founder and president of the City College the New Optical Society of America, SPIE, European Optical Society students chapters, and New York State Center for Complex Light.

"How to be a successful physics student"

Being a successful physics student, whether an undergraduate or graduate, can often seem a precarious task. In this talk I will share my personal journey as an undergraduate and graduate physics student and what I have learned are the keys to success including graduate school applications, fellowships, publishing, finding the right mentor, the job search, professional networking, and "the love of the game."

"Advancing physics with complex light: Nanoscale imaging to quantum cryptography"
Light is the premier resource for theoretical and experimental physics. From using light's polarization to understanding the Stern-Gerlach experiment to using the double slit diffraction to reveal wave particle duality, light's ubiquitous nature and experimentally accessible degrees of freedom have been exploited again and again. Recently, there is increasing interest in what is referred to as complex light. Complex light pertains to light's spatial degree of freedom being distinct from other degrees of freedom such as polarization (sunglasses) or wavelength (color). In this talk I will show how complex light is a new resource that can be used to advance physics in several applications including imaging at the nanoscale, creating tractor beams for micron sized particles, increasing the speed of data over optical fibers, and increasing the security of quantum cryptography.
 

Richard Crandall

BS CCNY 2014; MS Student in Physics (Mentor: Assoc. Prof. Jiufeng Tu)

"Vortex Raman Spectroscopy and NSF I-Corps Program" and lab tour

 

Richard Steinberg

Professor Richard Steinberg, School of Education and Department of Physics, The City College of New York

 

Arthur Kosowsky

Professor Arthur Kosowsky, University of Pittsburgh

 

 

 

 

 

 

Giovanni Milione

Giovanni Milione, Ph.D. Student (Mentor: Distinguished Professor Robert Alfano); National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow, NEC Laboratories America Inc.; Institute for Ultrafast Spectroscopy and Lasers, Physics Department; City College of New York of the City University of New York; Graduate Center of the City University of New York