Summer 2022 Undergraduate courses

WE ARE OFFERING COURSES DURING SESSION ONE AND SESSION TWO.

SESSION ONE/JUNE SESSION ACADEMIC CALENDAR
SESSION TWO/JULY SESSION ACADEMIC CALENDAR

 

Summer Session I:  June 6 – July 5, 2022

300- Level Literature Courses

Please note: 300-level classes assume some background and prior experience at the 200-level. Students should complete two 200 level courses before embarking on 300 level work.  Generally, these classes require two shorter essays and one longer assignment or final paper involving research or reference to secondary materials.

ENGL 31865
Irish Literature: A Sampling
6506                 Sec. 1MM                                 Estha Weiner                          M TU W TH    2:30pm – 5:05pm

“Mad Ireland hurt you into poetry.” W.H. Auden, In Memory of W.B. Yeats 

Yes, a sampling of genres: poetry, non-fiction {essays}, short fiction, drama, from the 18th Century to the 21st. The frame in this class is on genre, though the volume of this literature could be viewed from a variety of perspectives.  Critical/literary, historical, and political perspectives will provide a context, as well as videos, virtual readings, and performances.  Also, a list of variant Irish literary and theatrical organizations in NY will be provided.  Finally, we’ll be reading authors writing in English and in Irish { in translation} , and attempt to pronounce these authors’ names as correctly as possible!

ENGL 31866
Skazka, Povest’, Rasskaz: Russian Literature in Short Fiction Forms
7406                  Sec. 1LL                                   Anna Linetskaya                        M TU W TH    11:30pm – 2:05pm 
ONLINE 

What comes to mind when you think about Russian Literature? Most likely, “War and Peace,” “Brothers Karamazov”, and other 600+ page-long books, and a healthy dose of intimidation at the thought of reading them. Fear not: this summer, we will take a different approach to get familiar with the culture and the literary works that shaped it. From magical kingdoms guarded by dragons, to 19th-century heartbroken romantics, to WWII exiles struggling with inter-generational trauma: we will sample the various offerings of Russian-language writers through fairy tails (skazka), short stories (povest’), and novellas (rasskaz). Our discussions will focus on both the internal organization and meaning of individual stories and the historical evolution of Russian prose and its changing political and cultural contexts. Among the writers we will read are: Alexander Pushkin, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Leo Tolstoy, Anna Engelhardt, Alexander Solzhenitsyn, Lyudmila Ulitskaya, and many others. Fabulist, realistic, impressionistic, romantic, satirical—and manageably short—these stories are guaranteed to find a place in your mind as well as on your bookshelf. 

This course is open to everyone and should be of particular interest to prospective and current majors in literature as well as to students interested in creative writing. No knowledge of Russian is required. 

ENGL 34200
Advanced Grammar

6505                Sec. 1AA                                        Nicole Treska                           M TU W TH    8:30am – 11:05am

Advanced Grammar reviews principles of traditional English grammar and usage (parts of speech, sentence structures, punctuation, pronoun/verb form/agreement, etc.) for English majors and minors, especially for those who plan to teach or work as tutors or editors.  It is not a remedial course for non-majors who struggle with writing problems, though many non-majors take it.  There is a custom-published workbook for the course, and used copies of it are not allowed.

Creative Writing Courses

ENGL 22000                           
Introduction to Creative Writing
6429        Sec. 1AA                                     Matthew Gahler                           M TU W TH        8:30am – 11:05am                                                               
Why do we write? Writing helps us communicate and interact with the world around us. It forces us to pay attention to the details and happenings that surround us. We do this through observation. The purpose of this course is to help you practice and refine your observation skills while you practice turning those observations into layered and articulate forms of communication. In this course, we will focus on poetry, short prose, short fiction, and hybrid pieces to help guide us as we create our own works.​                                                                                                                           

ENGL 22100
Prerequisite: English 22000
Intermediate Creative Writing: Reading as Writers
6422      Sec. 1LL                                       Kamelya Youssef                              M TU W TH    11:30am – 2:05pm
ONLINE

In this intermediate creative writing workshop, students will be gaining practice, experience, and tools as they write, read, and discuss together. We will study traditional and non-traditional model texts from a diverse array of writers across genres of poetry, fiction, and creative non-fiction. This course emphasizes generating new writing, thoughtful revision, craft across the spectrum, and learning to read as writers. We’ll engage in deep study of literary forms, and discuss their effect on us as individuals and as a populace, all the while trying to make new with our own work. While this course is operated with the belief that writers must read deeply and extensively, it also aims to amplify the students’ own voices, tendencies, and imaginations.

ENGL 23000
Writing Workshop in Prose
6427     Sec. 1MM                                       Nicholas Otte                               M TU W TH          2:30pm – 5:05pm                

The course is dedicated to the craft of writing NONFICTION prose. Nonfiction writing consists of, but is not limited to, journalism and reportage, the argumentative essay, the personal essay, the critical essay, memoir, biography, travelogues, self-help and how-to manuals, and historical and philosophical writing. The aim is to introduce the student to the rich and varied genre of nonfictional prose by reading from established writers and also writing in the genre.


Summer Session II: July 6 – August 2, 2022

300- Level Literature Course

Please note: 300-level classes assume some background and prior experience at the 200-level. Students should complete two 200 level courses before embarking on 300 level work.  Generally, these classes require two shorter essays and one longer assignment or final paper involving research or reference to secondary materials.

ENGL 31821
Modern European Fiction

6507     Sec. 2AA                                     Amir Dagan                                   M TU W TH    8:30am – 11:05am

This course is a survey in modernist European fiction. Beginning with Dostoevsky’s “Notes from Underground,” which addresses alienation and the struggle between the individual and utilitarian modern society, we will move on to explore: inner city life in James Joyce, the absurdity of the modern condition in Kafka, sexual awakening in DH Lawrence, stream of consciousness in Virginia Woolf, the trauma of war in Rebecca West, the search for beauty in Thomas Mann, and the theme of memory in Marcel Proust.  Throughout we shall ask: how does modernism differ from traditional storytelling in plot, characterization and perspective? How are the changing social conditions of the early twentieth century mirrored in the subject and structure of stories? What unique insights does modernist literature offer about the place of the individual consciousness in what seems an increasingly unstable and absurd world?

Creative Writing Courses

ENGL 22000
Introduction to Creative Writing

6428             Sec. 2AA                              Katelyn Conroy                            M TU W TH 8:30am – 11:05am

In this course, we will be introduced to some of the main genres of creative writing: poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. We will read, mainly contemporary, texts from each genre and compose work in each genre. We will also write our own theories of writing: your purpose as a writer, your beliefs/intentions, your audience. All of your work will go into a final portfolio at the end of the course. To form a writing community and a writing identity, this course emphasizes collaboration and discussion along with independent work.

ENGL 23000
Writing Workshop in Prose
6572             Sec. 2LL                                    G.D. Peters                                M TU W TH 11:30am – 2:05pm

The course is dedicated to the craft of writing NONFICTION prose. Nonfiction writing consists of, but is not limited to, journalism and reportage, the argumentative essay, the personal essay, the critical essay, memoir, biography, travelogues, self-help and how-to manuals, and historical and philosophical writing. The aim is to introduce the student to the rich and varied genre of nonfictional prose by reading from established writers and also writing in the genre.

 

Last Updated: 05/17/2022 17:32