Colin Powell Graduate Fellowship


The Colin Powell Graduate Fellowship in Leadership and Public Service  

The Colin Powell Graduate Fellowship in Leadership and Public Service is a one-year program that enables graduate students to use their developing academic expertise to address urgent social justice issues for African Americans and other underserved communities. Fellows work with a faculty or community sponsor to develop a thoughtful project that impacts the public. In addition, fellows attend seminars that meet regularly throughout the year, special events, and other professional development activities. applicant should be included. If applicable, sponsors should work in conjunction with the candidate to demonstrate that their project is in compliance with Institutional Review Board (IRB) protocol and procedures. Sponsors must be willing to supervise the graduate fellow’s work throughout the year, providing guidance and suggesting relevant resources or skill-building tools as necessary. Sponsors may not offer support for more than one applicant per academic year.

Image of the top of Shepard Hall and a blue sky

1-year program
- sponsorship
- projects
- seminars
Each fellow will receive a maximum of $12,000 for the academic year.
Deadline: Mar. 15th, 2022
Apply Here
SUPPORT

Each fellow will receive a maximum of $12,000 for the academic year.


SPONSORSHIP

Prior to applying for the fellowship, students must secure a sponsor, identify a specific project, and work in conjunction with their sponsor to create a realistic and thoughtful work plan for the year. Sponsors may be a faculty member at City College or at the CUNY Graduate Center, or a professional in a leadership role at a nonprofit organization or government agency. If the project is already underway, a clear description of the roles and responsibilities to be carried out by the applicant should be included. If applicable, sponsors should work in conjunction with the candidate to demonstrate that their project is in compliance with Institutional Review Board (IRB) protocol and procedures. Sponsors must be willing to supervise the graduate fellow’s work throughout the year, providing guidance and suggesting relevant resources or skill-building tools as necessary. Sponsors may not offer support for more than one applicant per academic year.


SEMINAR

The year-long, monthly seminar is designed as a series of discussions to provide graduate fellows with the time and space to engage in independent, purposeful, and meaningful study of a topic that ultimately pushes them towards a long-term, postgraduation goal. Over the course of the academic year, students will be asked to think deeply about the kinds of issues, questions, skills or areas of knowledge that are important to their work, and to simultaneously develop a systematic process for learning about that issue, question, skill, or area of knowledge. At the end of the year, graduate fellows will be asked to deliver a formal, in-depth presentation that outlines their project, their findings, and the ways in which the experience might contribute to a public issue impacting underserved communities. Seminar times and dates will be determined by the group at the beginning of the fall semester.
 

ELIGIBILITY

Applicants must be graduate students enrolled in one of the social science graduate programs offered through the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership. These include: the Public Administration MPA; the International Affairs MIA/JD; the Sociology MA; the Economics MA; the Mental Health Counseling MA; the Psychology MA; and the Clinical Psychology PhD. You must have a minimum of one full academic year left in your graduate studies at the beginning of the fellowship term and you must be enrolled full-time during the length of the fellowship. We accept students regardless of citizenship status.

PROJECT

Fellows may decide, in conjunction with their sponsor, to pursue a project of their own creation, or assist their sponsor in an ongoing, established research project. Students can choose to design and execute an independent study of a particular social phenomenon, serve as a research associate for a community-based organization, or carry out predetermined responsibilities for a faculty-sponsored project that is already underway. All projects must address social justice issues impacting African Americans and other underserved populations.


PROJECT PROPOSAL

Please describe the project you hope to complete during the course of the fellowship. Your project proposal should be between 1,000 and 1,500 words and include the following:

• A clear rationale for why you have chosen to pursue this project and how it might serve to further the conversation on a pressing social justice issue and/or impact an underserved community;

• A draft outline of your proposed work plan, including a discussion of deliverables and outcomes;

• Whether your sponsor is a faculty member or a professional in a leadership role at a nonprofit organization or government agency;

• Whether the project is part of established, ongoing research or newly created.

APPLICATIONS AND DEADLINES

Completed applications must include the following:

• A project proposal;
• Two recommendation letters, including one from a faculty or community sponsor;
• A resume; and
• A transcript (can be the unofficial version from CUNYfirst).


All applications must be submitted by 5 pm on Mar. 15, 2022. Please submit all your materials, with the exception of the recommendation letters, through the application form. Advise your recommender to email their letters to cpsfellowships@gmail.com by Mar. 15. We will confirm that we have received your application two to four weeks after submission.

QUESTIONS?

Contact Debbie Cheng, Director of Fellowships, Colin Powell School Office of Fellowships, dcheng@ccny.cuny.edu

Colin Powell Fellows
ta Tamires Amorin

Tamires Amorim is a graduate student in her second year of the Master of Economics Program at the Colin Powell School. After she obtained her Bachelor’s Degree in International Relations in Brazil, she came to the United States. She has participated in various activities with New York Cares which are geared towards implementing different social projects in New York City. These experiences exposed her to various social and economic issues impacting African Americans and other minorities in New York, which motivated her to pursue a degree at CCNY. Tamires is currently working with Dinner Table Documentary, a nonprofit organization that partners with schools and community organizations to provide college and career readiness workshops to African American women. She is passionate about social change and believes that research is an important tool to the development of policies aimed to secure the rights of African Americans and other underrepresented communities.

 

pb Philip Beard

Phillip Beard is a graduate student at the Colin Powell School entering his second year of the Master of Public Administration program. He was born and raised in Brooklyn, NY to a Jamaican mother and a Trinbagonian father. His parents taught him the value of education and the importance of using it to make a positive impact within economically and politically oppressed communities. Phillip is a social justice advocate who is focused on addressing systems of inequality. His professional philosophy is rooted in creating solutions to combat systemic and institutional inequality targeting marginalized communities.

afAni Fredman

Ani Fredman is a fourth-year doctoral candidate in the clinical psychology PhD program at CCNY. Prior to beginning doctoral studies, Ani received a bachelor’s degree in religious studies from Vassar College, and worked with Dr. Beatrice Beebe in her mother-infant lab at New York State Psychiatric Institute. As a genderfluid queer individual, Ani is passionate about growing community access to mental health, specifically for underserved LGBTQ+ individuals. Ani is committed to anti-racist praxis and conducting mindful research and clinical practice. Ani was drawn to CCNY because of the shared commitment to provide services that hold our community in mind. In their first year of doctoral study, Ani played basketball for the CCNY Beavers, and continues to play basketball, read books and paint watercolors.

spSupriya Pandit 

Supriya Pandit is a fourth-year doctoral student in the Clinical Psychology PhD program at CCNY.  As an international student, Supriya's multicultural upbringing in India, England and Singapore initially inspired her deep commitment for social justice research for diverse and marginalized populations, especially for immigrants and families. After obtaining her BA in Psychology from the University of Rochester and MA in Psychology from New York University, Supriya conducted field research for the Resilience Opportunity Safety Education Strength Program at NYU, a community-based and trauma-informed research program aimed at reducing girls' crime in the juvenile justice system. Supriya was also involved in the research team of the Group Attachment-Based Intervention, an intervention seeking to reduce risk for child mistreatment and improve parent-child relations for underserved families in the Bronx, at the New School for Social Research. 

jsJeanette Sanchez

Jeanette Sanchez is an early education teacher committed to creating an equitable, equal, and multiculturally empowering educational environment for all children. She is a first grade teacher at Bronx Community Charter School and received her MSEd Degree with honors in Early Childhood Education from CCNY. She was also the recipient of The City College of New York Graduate Program in Early Childhood Education’s Life-Long Learner Award in Summer 2021. Jeanette will begin a Master’s of Public Administration and the Colin Powell Graduate Fellowship in Leadership and Public Service in Fall 2021. As a fellow, Jeanette will work as a research aid for Dr. Beverly Falk and the HQEL project team in evaluating current desegregation efforts in NYC early childhood education centers to help inform ongoing education and desegregation policies.  

Last Updated: 03/14/2022 09:25