Selected Summer Favorites

 

Take a look at some of the fun and exciting courses that we have to offer this summer at City.

Do you see something that looks interesting? APPLY TODAY for one of the courses listed below!

Need more information about registration dates and fees?  We are here to help!

Extended Session: June 1, 2020 - July 22, 2020

ASTR 30500: Methods of Astronomy

Designed to fulfill the Scientific World requirement of the CUNY Pathways common core, the course covers the fundamental physical laws that underlie the motions of heavenly bodies, including Newtonian mechanics and Einstein's theory of relativity, planetary, stellar and galactic evolution; the methods, techniques and instruments used by modern astronomy, including the Hubble Space Telescope and planetary space probes.

Instructor: Michael Lubell
Department: Physics
Virtual Meeting Times: TBA


CHEM11000: Exploring Chemistry for Non-Science Majors

Designed to fulfill the Life and Physical Science requirement of the Pathways Core curriculum, this course first explores scientific measurement – basic calculations using different types of units – from a historical and cultural perspective.  Following those introductory topics, the course explores the fundamental ideas of modern chemistry – (structure of atoms and molecules, relationship between structure and properties) and surveys the different types of chemical reactions (electron transfer, proton transfer, nuclear) with real life applications to food chemistry (e.g., Maillard reaction) and soap & detergency science (history of soap making, hydrophilic-lipophilic balance, micelles). Finally, a  few simple experiments will be conducted to illustrate the concepts introduced in class.

Instructor: Laurent Mars
Department: Chemistry
Virtual Meeting Times: Mondays-Thursdays, 6:00pm-7:15pm.

3 credits


IAS 31132: Housing: The Right to the City

This online course explores the meanings we attach to the notion of housing, shelter, property and home specially amidst the current COVID-19 pandemic. Departing from an engagement with the concept of “the right to the city” as theorized by Henri Lefebvre, Peter Marcuse, David Harvey, and Marc Purcell. The course discusses the usefulness of the concept in working toward a more just and equitable city, especially, as it relates to housing. We will study the history of housing policy and housing movements in the US, including Mayor DeBlasio’s recently released housing plan.

Instructor: Susannah Shaller
Department: CWE
Virtual Meeting Times: Asynchronous

4 credits


IAS 31155: Witches, Masons, Slaves, Revolutionaries

The Hemispheric Atlantic represents the point of contact between: indigenous peoples both honored (and exoticised) and certainly exploited (if not completely decimated) by colonial and neocolonial powers; Africans taken forcefully from throughout their continent through complex systems of slave trading; Europeans engaged in the colonial machine; and later immigrant groups from Asia. As such, Vodou, Regla de Ocha, and Candomblé, among others, as systems of sacred knowledge, have interacted with revolutionary theories deliberated transatlantically among public spaces as geographically divergent as France, the Netherlands, North America, the Caribbean, and Central and South America.

Instructor: Alessandra Benedicty
Department: CWE
Virtual Meeting Times: Asynchronous

4 credits


IAS 31168: Digital Media and Society

The current COVID-19 pandemic has forced society to confront a new reality: digital media has become part and parcel of our daily lives, as well as an active agent of social and institutional change, altering the very nature of government, education, health, the news, and labor. This course will introduce students to the history of digital technologies, including the Internet, Web 2.0 platforms and social media, and the “smart” phone and will locate these histories within a sociological framework, asking and answering the question: What “social effects” did these technologies bring about? This class will explore both macro and micro issues, including issues of inequality, digital social movements and community formation, digital labor, surveillance, race, and gender online, and digital social interactions. By conducting an ongoing ethnography of our own digital media behavior, such as our “likes” on Facebook, the prevalence of email at work, or the use of a Learning Management System in your classroom, this class will explore the social meaning, value, and agency of our digital lives. This course will be taught as a hybrid course, with some work done online, across various media platforms including Wordpress, Blackboard, Email, Twitter or Facebook, and Text Messaging. While our videoconference meetings will include tutorials to these platforms, which we will critically engage and analyze.

Instructor: Diami Virgilio
Department: CWE
Virtual Meeting Times: Tuesdays 6 - 9:20 p.m.

4 credits

Session 1: June 1, 2020 - June 25, 2020

ANTH 31956 / INTL 31957: Politics and Society in the Middle East

This class introduces students to core topics in the study of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA): (post-) colonialism, modernity, nationalism, state formation, economic development, democratization, gender, religion, and the politics of daily life. Students will also examine the ways the region has been shaped by many waves of social movements, including nationalism, Marxism, feminism, and Islamism. The class introduces students to theoretical concepts and historical contexts for approaching the region in an informed manner and for reflecting on preconceived notions about the region.

Instructor: Derek Richard Ludovici
Department: Anthropology/International Studies
Virtual Meeting Times:

3 credits


ARTE 32505 (UGRAD)/ARTE 8608N (GRAD): Arts, Education, and Human Rights

Through an exploration of visual art that has been used in prominent human rights campaigns, from protest art to large-scale public installations, this course will explore the intersection of the arts and human rights and how the two intersect to catalyze social change in communities across the globe,  and inspire human rights movements.  Throughout this course, will become familiar with artists, movements and/or institutions, and practitioners and organizations working at this intersection. Lastly, through collaborative activities and class discussions, students will understand use of the visual arts, as a tool for understanding how societies process and critically reflect upon human rights issues directly impacting them.

Instructor: Marissa Gutierez-Vicario
Department: Education
Virtual Meeting Times: M, WE 6:00 p.m. - 9:05 p.m.

2 credits


BLST 31916: Fear of a Black Planet: Race at the End of the World

This course will examine speculative literature, cinema, and music, engaging interdisciplinary critical theories to analyze and respond to North American cultural productions from 1619 to 2020, featuring black characters facing the end of the world and a phantasmic future. Positionality, racial coding, and media representation will be the focus on sociopolitical and aesthetic inquiry. Beginning with the Middle Passage and poetry of Phillis Wheatley, concluding with The Last Black Man In San Francisco (2019), and artistic responses to the COVID-19 pandemic, students will consider how deeply race impacts American "post-national" identity and conditions in futuristic representations of apocalyptic crises and what, if anything, comes next. Afrofuturist authors, such as Octavia Butler, Colson Whitehead, Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah, and related theorists including Du Bois, Fanon, Asante, Thiong'o and Morrison; classic sci-fi cinema featuring Harry Belafonte and popular films like Independence Day, The Fifth Element, The Matrix, Interstellar, and Black Panther; along with poets and futuristic musicians from George Clinton to Outkast and Erykah Badu will be covered. ​

Instructor: Janelle Poe
Department: Black Studies Program
Virtual Meeting Times: M, TU, W, TH 2:30 PM - 5:05 PM

3 credits


EAS 31123: From the Arctic to the Amazon: Earth Science in the Space Age

Remote sensing techniques have enabled major advances in Earth sciences, providing capabilities for advancing our understanding of Earth’s environment, including in remote and logistically challenging regions. This course will take you on a virtual tour of Earth’s ecosystems as they are studied from Earth-orbiting satellites. With research extending from the tropics to the Arctic, and from forests to tundra to coral reefs, Earth scientists uncover the secrets of how the Earth system functions. Students will be introduced to issues faced by ecosystems in the era of climate change and to the capabilities of remote sensing satellites for advancing the understanding of our world.

Instructor: Kyle McDonald
Department: Earth and Atmospheric Sciences
Virtual Meeting Times: M/T/W/TH 2:00pm – 4:30 pm

3 credits


ECO 31150: Developing Management Skills

This experiential course attempts to bridge the theory-practice gap, addressing both time-honored principles of effective management and the latest research in the area. Students are introduced to surveys, exercises, and simulations that help them analyze and evaluate their existing managerial skills. A variety of conceptual tools help students develop and refine these skills.

Instructor: Raed K. Kaldi
Department: Economics & Business
Virtual Meeting Times: TBA

3 credits


EDUC 32600 (UGRAD) EDUC 7902N (GRAD): What is Online Teaching All About?: Instructional and Assessment Strategies

This course will model online instruction using different teaching and assessment tools. It will provide learners with effective teaching and learning strategies used in an online learning environment. This course is tailored for a wide audience, including university-level and continuing education educators, as well as pre-service and in-service K-12 teachers. The course focuses on the importance of maintaining instructional quality using an online platform while building an interactive and cohesive learning environment. ​

Instructors: Aminata Diop & Doris Grasserbauer
Department: Education
Virtual Meeting Times: M, WE 5:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.

3 credits


ENGL 38201: Great Writers on Life During Bad Times

This course will examine the works of some influential writers who examined how individuals and societies responded to catastrophic events. The selections will include those from writers who experienced or wrote about a plague/disease, natural disaster, or human-made calamity. The class will cover literature from ancient Greece to contemporary times and will include plays, poetry, short stories, a novel, and excerpts from longer works. Among the authors that will be read, discussed, and written about are Camus, Boccaccio, Shakespeare, Kushner, Sophocles, and Roth.​

Instructor: Mark Hoffman
Department: English
Virtual Meeting Times: M, TU, W, TH 8:30 am - 11:05 am

3 credits


LALS 23800: Dominican Heritage: From Trujillo to Present

An in-depth study of the sociocultural and historical realities of the Dominican Republic from 1930 to the present. The course will also cover the Dominican migration and the growth of the Dominican community in the United States.

Instructor: Daniel Nieves
Department: Latin American and Latino Studies
Virtual Meeting Times:

3 credits


PSC 31104: International Terrorism

The course will examine international terrorism both theoretically and empirically. In particular, we will: (1) examine the various (and often competing) ways to define and conceptualize it, (2) explore how and why state and non-state actors employ terrorism, (3) investigate the various forms it takes, (4) examine how its use influences world politics, and (5) discuss the alternative responses by governments to the organizations promoting it.

Instructor: Bruce L. Cronin
Department:
Virtual Meeting Times: TBA

3 credits


PSY 31122: The History of Madness

What is madness? How do we define what is normal behavior and what is abnormal? In a society who has the authority to decide that one person is mad, and another is normal? How has madness been treated over the years, and is it ethical to treat it even if the other person does not want to be treated? How does our understanding of madness intersect with race, gender, and sexuality? These are several questions that remain unanswered and/or controversial today.  This course seeks to explore these and many related subjects. We will explore the social, cultural, and intellectual history of madness as well as the institutions that specialize in its treatment in order to understand how madness and its treatment has changed throughout the course of American History. ​

Instructor: Griffin Norris Thayer
Department: Psychology
Virtual Meeting Times:

3 credits


PSY 31135: Dreams, Power & Superheroes

In this course, we will look at how we can use comic books to understand various topics in psychology, and how comic books have addressed concepts such as power, discrimination, and the human psyche. Comic books often explore the darkness of human beings, from the psychopathy of the Joker to the addiction of Iron Man, and the characters can often help us understand what triggers and motivates human psychology. Comic books have also criticized the status quo, warned of the dangers of an uninformed, overreaching government, and explored the limits of technology. Here we will explore these topics using scholarly sources, the classic comic medium, as well as movies and TV shows based on comic books.

Instructor: Nishanthi Anthonipillai
Department:
Virtual Meeting Times: 2:30 - 5:05 pm Mon-Thurs

3 credits


PSY 31825: Psychology of Love

This course is designed to give students an understanding of the psychological, physiological, and sociological factors related to the thing called LOVE. Explore a variety of topics as they relate to our experiences within interpersonal relationships (i.e., stages of love, types of love, patterns within how we love, identify how we want to be loved, etc). By the end of this course, students should have a better understanding of the roller coaster of emotions that Love entails and be better versed in knowing how to venture in their journey of loving oneself as well as others.

Instructor: Mabel Marbella Gomez
Department:
Virtual Meeting Times: 6 - 8:35 pm Mon - Thurs

3 credits


SOC 31995: Health Inequalities in the Global Context

This course will examine the long-term patterns and processes underlying global health disparities within and between countries with respect to health care access and the political and health consequences embedded in these inequalities. Specifically, the course will study the political, economic, and institutional relationships within and between countries that shape health care access and how these relationships affect the susceptibility of citizens in disparate nations to chronic and acute health conditions. We will also examine how these structural relationships are likely to create the conditions for the emergence of catastrophic pandemics involving either new or mutated pathogens.

Instructor: Paul Galatowitsch
Department: Sociology
Virtual Meeting Times:

3 credits


THTR 26201: Broadway and Beyond…Without Leaving Your Couch!

Watch filmed theatre productions from the stages of NYC, London and beyond - and discuss the elements of theatrical production with your peers and members of the global theatre community: Actors, Directors and even Theatre Critics! Students will get to see a wide range of productions - from Shakespeare to modern hit musicals - and learn about what goes into a show from before the first rehearsal to opening night!

Instructor: Sue Kerner
Department: Theatre and Speech
Virtual Meeting Times: TBA

2 credits

Session 2: July 6, 2020 - July 30, 2020

Art 31934: South Africa and Mexican Printmaking

The Taller Grafica Popular in Mexico and the Medu Arts Ensemble in South Africa are both examples of artists collaborating for the rights of others. In this class, we'll explore, through studio artmaking projects, the role of drawing, illustration, printmaking, and more. We'll also guide you through a historical look at these activist art communities of the 20th Century.

Instructor: 
Department: Art
Virtual Meeting Times:


ASTR 30500: Methods of Astronomy

Designed to fulfill the Scientific World requirement of the CUNY Pathways common core, the course covers the fundamental physical laws that underlie the motions of heavenly bodies, including Newtonian mechanics and Einstein's theory of relativity, planetary, stellar and galactic evolution; the methods, techniques, and instruments used by modern astronomy, including the Hubble Space Telescope and planetary space probes.

Instructor: Michael Lubell
Department: Physics
Virtual Meeting Times:


BIO 31052: Disease and History: How Plagues Have Influenced Humankind Through the Ages

In this course, we will learn about the myriad of pathogens and parasites that use humans as their hosts and, in so doing, have altered the course of history. You will learn the basic biology of these scourges as well as review the history of their discovery, treatment, and occasional eradication. With a lens on the current pandemic, we will cover what makes certain pathogens particularly dangerous and discuss where we should be looking for future outbreaks.

Instructor: Susan Perkins
Department: Biology
Virtual Meeting Times: 2 pm - 4:30 pm M-Th


CHEM11000: Exploring Chemistry for Non-Science Majors

Designed to fulfill the Life and Physical Science requirement of the Pathways Core curriculum, this course first explores scientific measurement – basic calculations using different types of units – from a historical and cultural perspective.  Following those introductory topics, the course explores the fundamental ideas of modern chemistry – (structure of atoms and molecules, the relationship between structure and properties) and surveys the different types of chemical reactions (electron transfer, proton transfer, nuclear) with real-life applications to food chemistry (e.g., Maillard reaction) and soap & detergency science (history of soap making, hydrophilic-lipophilic balance, micelles). Finally, a  few simple experiments will be conducted to illustrate the concepts introduced in class.

Instructor: Laurent Mars
Department: Chemistry
Virtual Meeting Times: Mondays - Thursdays, 6:00 pm - 7:15 pm.

3 credits


CHEM 32005: A Biography of SARS-CoV-2

The SARS-CoV-2 virus is a previously unseen human pathogen that causes COVID-19, a human respiratory disease.  Declared a global pandemic in March 2020, COVID-19 sickened millions and resulted in the deaths of hundreds of thousands across the globe.  SARS-CoV-2 and the COVID-19 pandemic exposed multiple weaknesses in human societies, including limits to science, technology, globalization, delivery of healthcare, economic and racial disparities that will likely influence problem-solvers for the next decade, if not the rest of this century. This course will present a detailed biography of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, from its start as an animal virus to its evolution into a human pathogen to its effect on the human body and human societies, to efforts to tame its pernicious effects.

Instructors: David Jeruzalmi, Ranajeet Ghose
Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry
Virtual Meeting Times: Monday-Thursday, 11:30 am – 2:00 pm

3 credits


IAS 31132: Housing: The Right to the City

This online course explores the meanings we attach to the notion of housing, shelter, property, and home, especially amidst the current COVID-19 pandemic. Departing from an engagement with the concept of "the right to the city" as theorized by Henri Lefebvre, Peter Marcuse, David Harvey, and Marc Purcell. The course discusses the usefulness of the concept in working toward a more just and equitable city, especially, as it relates to housing. We will study the history of housing policy and housing movements in the US, including Mayor de Blasio's recently released housing plan.

Instructor: Susannah Shaller
Department: CWE
Virtual Meeting Times: Asynchronous

4 credits


IAS 31155: Witches, Masons, Slaves, Revolutionaries

The Hemispheric Atlantic represents the point of contact between indigenous peoples both honored (and exoticized) and certainly exploited (if not completely decimated) by colonial and neocolonial powers; Africans taken forcefully from throughout their continent through complex systems of slave trading; Europeans engaged in the colonial machine, and later immigrant groups from Asia. As such, Vodou, Regla de Ocha, and Candomblé, among others, as systems of sacred knowledge, have interacted with revolutionary theories deliberated transatlantically among public spaces as geographically divergent as France, the Netherlands, North America, the Caribbean, and Central and South America.

Instructor: Alessandra Benedicty
Department: CWE
Virtual Meeting Times: Asynchronous

4 credits


IAS 31168: Digital Media and Society

The current COVID-19 pandemic has forced society to confront a new reality: digital media has become part and parcel of our daily lives, as well as an active agent of social and institutional change, altering the very nature of government, education, health, the news, and labor. This course will introduce students to the history of digital technologies, including the Internet, Web 2.0 platforms and social media, and the "smart" phone and will locate these histories within a sociological framework, asking and answering the question: What "social effects" did these technologies bring about? This class will explore both macro and micro issues, including issues of inequality, digital social movements and community formation, digital labor, surveillance, race, and gender online, and digital social interactions. By conducting an ongoing ethnography of our own digital media behavior, such as our "likes" on Facebook, the prevalence of email at work, or the use of a Learning Management System in your classroom, this class will explore the social meaning, value, and agency of our digital lives. This course will be taught as a hybrid course, with some work done online, across various media platforms including Wordpress, Blackboard, Email, Twitter or Facebook, and Text Messaging. While our videoconference meetings will include tutorials to these platforms, which we will critically engage and analyze.

Instructor: Diami Virgilio
Department: CWE
Virtual Meeting Times: Tuesdays 6 - 9:20 p.m. Videoconference

4 credits

Session 3: July 31, 2020 - August 21, 2020

PSY 31149/PSY B9845: Psychology of Music

 

Instructor: Michael Anthony Tate
Department: Psychology
Virtual Meeting Times: 11:30:00 AM - 2:05:00 PM MTuWTh


ANTH 20300: Human Origins

 

Instructor: Laura Chieko Matthews
Department: Anthropology
Virtual Meeting Times: 1:00:00 PM - 4:30:00 PM MTuWTh


MCA 10100: Introduction to Media Studies

 

Instructor: Rebecca AnnRivera
Department: Media & Communication Arts
Virtual Meeting Times: 11:30:00 AM - 3:00:00 PM MTuWTh


ECO 20150: Principles of Statistics

 

Instructor: Jay Jorgenson
Department: Economics and Business

 

Not finding the course you're looking for? 

See our Full Summer 2020 Schedule of Courses


 

Department Code Key - Search By Subject

Full Summer 2020 Course List

Subject Description
AES Architectural Environmental Studies
ANTH Anthropology
ARCH Anthropology
ART Art
ARTE Art Education
ASTR Astronomy
BIO Biology
BLST Black Studies
BME Biomedical Engineering
CHEM Chemistry
CSC Computer Science
EAS Earth and Atmospheric Studies
ECO Economics
EDCE Teaching, Learning, and Culture
EDLS Educational Leadership
EDSE Leadership and Special Education
EDUC Education
EE Electrical Engineering
ENGL English
ENGLE Secondary Education English
ENGR Engineering
HIST History
IAS Study of the Americas
INTL International Studies
JWST Jewish Studies
LALS Latin American and Latino Studies
MATH Mathematics
MATHE Secondary Education Math
MCA Media Arts Production
ME Mechanical Engineering
MED School of Medicine
MIS Computer Science
MUS Music
NSS New Student Seminar
PA Physician Assistant
PHIL Philosophy
PHYS Physics
PSC Political Science
PSM Public Service Management
PSY Psychology
SCI Science
SOC Sociology
SPAN Spanish
SPANE Secondary Education Spanish
SPCH Speech
SPED Special Education
THTR Theatre
USSO The Development of the United States and its People
WCIV World Civilizations
WHUM World Humanities
WS Women's Studies

Information For

CCNY Students

  1. Browse: from our list of interesting courses above or use our search tool to find the courses you want.
  2. Register: Register through CUNYfirst.

Students from Other CUNY Campuses

  1. Choose Your Classes: Browse from our list of interesting courses above or use our search tool to find the courses you want.
  2. Register: Register through CUNYfirst at your home college or explore another CUNY campus using E-permit.
    *Currently enrolled CUNY students MUST apply for an ePermit to register for courses at CCNY

Visiting Students

  1. Choose Your Classes: Browse from our list of interesting courses above or use our search tool to find the courses you want.
  2. Get Approved: Get your CUNY summer courses evaluated and approved by the appropriate department at your home college prior to registration. You can find course descriptions needed for evaluation in the Course Catalogs of the individual CUNY colleges.
  3. Apply: Submit a visiting student application at each of the the courses you’d like to take.
  4. Register: Once your application is reviewed and approved, you will be ready to register for your classes. Registration is online through our CUNYfirst system.