Courses & Requirements

For a list of current and upcoming classes, please click below:

Spring 2020 International Studies Classes

International Studies Courses



INTL 20100 -- International Studies: A Global Perspective

Professor Castro Ramos
Mondays & Wednesdays, 12:30 - 1:45 p.m.

 

 

INTL 30500 -- Global Social Theory

Professor Llaguno Nieves
Tuesdays & Thursdays, 9:30 - 10:45 a.m.

 

 

INTL 31107 -- Research Methods in International Studies

Professor Ludovici
Tuesdays 2:00-3:15 p.m. (Hybrid)

 

 

INTL 31123 -- Globalization

Professor Biles
Mondays & Wednesdays 11:00 a.m. - 12:15p.m.

 

 

INTL 31406 -- Model United Nations

Professor Szczurowski
Thursdays 5:00 - 7:30 p.m.

 

 

INTL 31603 -- Global Game: Sports and Globalization

Professor Castro Ramos
Mondays & Wednesdays 9:30 - 10:45 a.m.

 

 

INTL 31606 -- Human Rights, Humanitarianism, and Identity

Professor Onuonye
Mondays & Wednesdays 6:30 - 7:45 p.m.

 

 

INTL 31919 -- Rethinking Development 

Professor Wright
Mondays & Wednesdays 5:00 - 6:15 p.m.

 

 

INTL 32100 -- Senior Seminar in International Studies

Professor Rodriguez 
Wednesdays 2:00 - 4:30 p.m.

 

 

Professor Tommasoli

Fridays 9:00 - 11:30 a.m.

 

 

INTL 33200 -- Transnational Feminisms 

Professor Rodriguez
Thursdays 11:00a.m. - 12:15 p.m. (Hybrid)

Spring 2020 Electives for Culture and Communications Concentrators


***The  major requires a total of 6 classes, from at least 3 different programs or departments, ie, with at least 3 different prefixes such as ANTH, ECO, PSC, etc.***

The following are the lists of courses from different departments:

 

ANTH 20100 – Cross-Cultural Perspectives (only if not the student’s “theory” requirement)


ANTH 23600 – Anthropology of Gender and Sexuality


ANTH 24000 – Peoples of Africa


ANTH 24300 – Peoples of Latin America


ANTH 26500 – Language & Power


ANTH 31110 – Islam and Human Rights


ANTH 31131 – The Archaeology of Race and Slavery: Memory, Monuments, and Memorialization


ANTH 31403 – Women and Violations of Human Right


ANTH 31685 – LGBTQ World History


ANTH 31704 – Anthropology of the Climate Crisis


ANTH 31706 – Musical Cultures of the Caribbean: Sonic Reverberations of the Atlantic World


ANTH 31954 – Non-Violent Communication


ANTH 32100 – Health Issues and Alternatives


ANTH 32600 – Anthropology of Disability: From Memoir to Ethnography

 


Art Courses

ART 24020 – Photojournalism

 


Asian Studies Courses

ASIA 20200 – Contemporary Asia
 

ASIA 31127 – Cultural Identity in East Asia

 


Black Studies Courses

BLST 21200 – Caribbean Studies


BLST 31152 – African Cinema: Gender and Culture


BLST 31155 – Race, Class, and Power


BLST 31159 – Ethnic Minority Groups


BLST 37005 – African Literature

 


Economics Courses

ECO 20350 – Intermediate Macroeconomics


ECO 21350 – International Business Environment


ECO 32150 – International Finance


ECO 33450 – International Trade Theory

 


History Courses

HIST 20600 – Modern Europe


HIST 21300 – The Historian’s Craft


HIST 31448 – Social and Political History of the Middle East


HIST 42700 – History of Socialism

 


International Studies Courses

INTL 31123 -- Globalization 


INTL 31406 – Model UN


INTL 31603 – Global Game: Sports and Globalization


INTL 31606 -- Human Rights, Humanitarianism, and Identity 


INTL 31919 -- Rethinking Development 


INTL 31954 – Non-Violent Communication


INTL 32560 – Food & Farming  


INTL 33200 – Transnational Feminisms (only if not the student’s “theory” requirement)

 


Jewish Studies Courses

JWST 28100 – The Holocaust


JWST 31129 – Female Sexuality in Judaism


JWST 31172 – Jews of Eastern Europe


JWST 23200 – Jews in Film and Fiction

 


Latin American and Latino Studies Courses

LALS 31107 – Latinas and US Immigration


LALS 31132 – Blancas, Negras, y Morenas: Gender and Race in Another America

 


Media and Communications Arts Courses

MCA 20900 ­– Introduction to Public Relations


MCA 31006 – Race and Media


MCA 31133 – African Cinema: Gender and Culture


MCA 33300 – Reporting and Writing


MCA 34100 – Radio Journalism


MCA 40100 – Ethics and Values in Communication

 


Philosophy Courses

PHIL 30800 – Ethics


PHIL 31114 – Cities and Urban Life


PHIL 31121 – Social Ontology


PHIL 32277 – Philosophy of Race


PHIL 34905 – Biomedical Ethics

 


Political Science Courses

PSC 22300 – U.S. Foreign Policy


PSC 23000 – Contemporary Comparative Politics


PSC 23100 – Political Systems of Europe


PSC 25200 – Theories of International Relations


PSC 27400 – Modern Political Thought: Up to 1848


PSC 31159 – Politics and Religious Freedom


PSC 39900 – Peacemaking and Negotiations

 


Psychology Courses

PSY 24700 – Social Psychology


PSY 31150 – Psychology of People in Place: From Climate Change to Gentrification


PSY 34700 – Social Psychology of Racism and Prejudice

 


Sociology Courses

SOC 23700 – Foundations of Sociological Theory


SOC 31112 – Race, Class, and Power


SOC 34200 – Globalization  


SOC 31152 – Immigration and the Second Generation


SOC 38107 – Justice, Law, and Society

 


Spanish Courses

SPAN 28300 – Masterworks of Latin American Literature


SPAN 35100 – Studies in Spanish Literature


SPAN 45201 – Topics in Spanish American Civilization I


SPAN 45202 – Topics in Spanish American Civilization II

 


LGBTQ World History Courses

WS 31685 – LGBTQ World History

Spring 2020 Electives for Development Concentrators


***The  major requires a total of 6 classes, from at least 3 different programs or departments, ie, with at least 3 different prefixes such as ANTH, ECO, PSC, etc.***

The following are the lists of courses from different departments:

 

ANTH 20100 – Cross-Cultural Perspectives (only if not the student’s “theory” requirement)


ANTH 23600 – Anthropology of Gender and Sexuality


ANTH 24000 – Peoples of Africa


ANTH 24300 – Peoples of Latin America


ANTH 26500 – Language & Power


ANTH 31110 – Islam and Human Rights


ANTH 31131 – The Archaeology of Race and Slavery: Memory, Monuments, and Memorialization


ANTH 31403 – Women and Violations of Human Right


ANTH 31685 – LGBTQ World History


ANTH 31704 – Anthropology of the Climate Crisis


ANTH 31954 – Non-Violent Communication


ANTH 32100 – Health Issues and Alternatives


ANTH 32600 – Anthropology of Disability: From Memoir to Ethnography

 


Asian Studies Courses

ASIA 20200 – Contemporary Asia
 

ASIA 31127 – Cultural Identity in East Asia

 


Black Studies Courses

BLST 21200 – Caribbean Studies


BLST 31155 – Race, Class, and Power


BLST 31159 – Ethnic Minority Groups

 


Economics Courses

ECO 20350 – Intermediate Macroeconomics


ECO 21350 – International Business Environment


ECO 32150 – International Finance


ECO 33450 – International Trade Theory

 


History Courses

HIST 20600 – Modern Europe


HIST 31448 – Social and Political History of the Middle East


HIST 42700 – History of Socialism

 


International Studies Courses

INTL 31123 -- Globalization 


INTL 31406 – Model UN


INTL 31603 – Global Game: Sports and Globalization


INTL 31919 -- Rethinking Development 


INTL 31954 – Non-Violent Communication


INTL 32560 – Food & Farming  


INTL 33200 – Transnational Feminisms (only if not the student’s “theory” requirement)

 


Latin American and Latino Studies Courses

LALS 31107 – Latinas and US Immigration


LALS 31132 – Blancas, Negras, y Morenas: Gender and Race in Another America

 


Philosophy Courses

PHIL 30800 – Ethics


PHIL 31114 – Cities and Urban Life


PHIL 31121 – Social Ontology


PHIL 32277 – Philosophy of Race


PHIL 34905 – Biomedical Ethics

 


Political Science Courses

PSC 21000 – Urban Politics


PSC 22300 – U.S. Foreign Policy


PSC 22900 – Women and Politics


PSC 23000 – Contemporary Comparative Politics


PSC 23100 – Political Systems of Europe


PSC 25200 – Theories of International Relations


PSC 27400 – Modern Political Thought: Up to 1848


PSC 31159 – Politics and Religious Freedom


PSC 39900 – Peacemaking and Negotiations

 


Psychology Courses

PSY 24700 – Social Psychology


PSY 31150 – Psychology of People in Place: From Climate Change to Gentrification


PSY 34700 – Social Psychology of Racism and Prejudice

 


Sociology Courses

SOC 23700 – Foundations of Sociological Theory


SOC 31112 – Race, Class, and Power


SOC 34200 – Globalization  


SOC 31152 – Immigration and the Second Generation


SOC 38107 – Justice, Law, and Society

 


LGBTQ World History Courses

WS 31685 – LGBTQ World History

Spring 2020 Electives for International Public Policy Concentrators


***The  major requires a total of 6 classes, from at least 3 different programs or departments, ie, with at least 3 different prefixes such as ANTH, ECO, PSC, etc.***

The following are the lists of courses from different departments:

 

ANTH 20100 – Cross-Cultural Perspectives (only if not the student’s “theory” requirement)


ANTH 23600 – Anthropology of Gender and Sexuality


ANTH 24000 – Peoples of Africa


ANTH 24300 – Peoples of Latin America


ANTH 26500 – Language & Power


ANTH 31110 – Islam and Human Rights


ANTH 31131 – The Archaeology of Race and Slavery: Memory, Monuments, and Memorialization


ANTH 31403 – Women and Violations of Human Right


ANTH 31685 – LGBTQ World History


ANTH 31704 – Anthropology of the Climate Crisis


ANTH 31954 – Non-Violent Communication


ANTH 32100 – Health Issues and Alternatives


ANTH 32600 – Anthropology of Disability: From Memoir to Ethnography

 


Asian Studies Courses

ASIA 20200 – Contemporary Asia
 

ASIA 31127 – Cultural Identity in East Asia

 


Black Studies Courses

BLST 21200 – Caribbean Studies


BLST 31155 – Race, Class, and Power


BLST 31159 – Ethnic Minority Groups

 


Economics Courses

ECO 20350 – Intermediate Macroeconomics


ECO 21350 – International Business Environment


ECO 32150 – International Finance


ECO 33450 – International Trade Theory

 


History Courses

HIST 20600 – Modern Europe


HIST 31448 – Social and Political History of the Middle East


HIST 42700 – History of Socialism

 


International Studies Courses

INTL 31108 – Transnational Feminisms


INTL 31123 -- Globalization 


INTL 31406 – Model UN


INTL 31603 – Global Game: Sports and Globalization


INTL 31606 -- Human Rights, Humanitarianism, and Identity 


INTL 31919 -- Rethinking Development 


INTL 31954 – Non-Violent Communication


INTL 32560 – Food & Farming  


INTL 33200 – Transnational Feminisms (only if not the student’s “theory” requirement)

 


Latin American and Latino Studies Courses

LALS 31107 – Latinas and US Immigration


LALS 31132 – Blancas, Negras, y Morenas: Gender and Race in Another America

 


Philosophy Courses


PHIL 31114 – Cities and Urban Life


PHIL 31121 – Social Ontology


PHIL 32277 – Philosophy of Race


PHIL 34905 – Biomedical Ethics

 


Political Science Courses

PSC 21000 – Urban Politics


PSC 22300 – U.S. Foreign Policy


PSC 22900 – Women and Politics


PSC 23000 – Contemporary Comparative Politics


PSC 23100 – Political Systems of Europe


PSC 25200 – Theories of International Relations


PSC 27400 – Modern Political Thought: Up to 1848


PSC 31159 – Politics and Religious Freedom


PSC 39900 – Peacemaking and Negotiations

 


Psychology Courses

PSY 24700 – Social Psychology


PSY 34700 – Social Psychology of Racism and Prejudice


PSY 35500 – Psychology of Women and Violence

 


Sociology Courses

SOC 23700 – Foundations of Sociological Theory


SOC 31112 – Race, Class, and Power


SOC 31114 – The Hispanic Urban Child


SOC 31132 – Blancas, Negras y Morenas: Gender and Race in Another America


SOC 34200 – Globalization  


SOC 31146 – Soc Psy Racsm Prejud


SOC 31152 – Immigration and the Second Generation


SOC 38107 – Justice, Law, and Society

 


LGBTQ World History Courses

WS 31685 – LGBTQ World History

Spring 2020 Electives for International Relations Concentrators


***The  major requires a total of 6 classes, from at least 3 different programs or departments, ie, with at least 3 different prefixes such as ANTH, ECO, PSC, etc.***

The following are the lists of courses from different departments:

 

ANTH 20100 – Cross–Cultural Perspectives


ANTH 24000 – Peoples of Africa


ANTH 24300 – Peoples of Latin America


ANTH 26500 – Language and Power


ANTH 31110 – Islam and Human Rights


ANTH 31131 – The Archaeology of Race and Slavery: Memory, Monuments, and Memorialization


ANTH 31403 – Women and Violations of Human Rights


ANTH 31685 – LGBTQ World History


ANTH 31704 – Anthropology of the Climate Crisis


ANTH 31954 – Non-Violent Communication

 


Asian Studies Courses

ASIA 20200 – Contemporary Asia
 

ASIA 31127 – Cultural Identity in East Asia

 


Black Studies Courses

BLST 21200 – Caribbean Studies


BLST 31155 – Race, Class, and Power

 


Economics Courses

ECO 20350 – Intermediate Macroeconomics


ECO 21350 – International Business Environment


ECO 32150 – International Finance


ECO 33450 – International Trade Theory

 


History Courses

HIST 20600 – Modern Europe


HIST 31448 – Social and Political History of the Middle East

 


International Studies Courses

INTL 31108 – Transnational Feminisms


INTL 31123 -- Globalization 


INTL 31406 – Model UN


INTL 31603 – Global Game: Sports and Globalization


INTL 31606 -- Human Rights, Humanitarianism, and Identity 


INTL 31919 -- Rethinking Development 


INTL 31954 – Non-Violent Communication


INTL 33200 – Transnational Feminisms (only if not the student’s “theory” requirement)

 


Media and Communications Arts Courses

MCA 20900 – Introduction to Public Relations

 


Philosophy Courses


PHIL 31121 – Social Ontology


PHIL 32277 – Philosophy of Race


PHIL 34905 – Biomedical Ethics

 


Political Science Courses

PSC 22300 – US Foreign Policy


PSC 22900 – Women and Politics


PSC 23000 – Contemporary Comparative Politics


PSC 23100 – Political Systems of Europe


PSC 27400 – Modern Political Thought: Up to 1848


PSC 31159 – Politics and Religious Freedom


PSC 39900 – Peacemaking and Negotiations

 


Sociology Courses

SOC 23700 – Foundations of Sociological Theory


SOC 31112 – Race, Class, and Power


SOC 34200 – Globalization  


SOC 38107 – Justice, Law, and Society

 


LGBTQ World History Courses

WS 31685 – LGBTQ World History

Winter 2020 International Studies Classes

***The  major requires a total of 6 classes, from at least 3 different programs or departments, ie, with at least 3 different prefixes such as ANTH, ECO, PSC, etc.***

The following are the lists of courses from different departments:

 

SOC 31154 – Undocumented: Living in the Shadows

Professor Sloan
Tuesday, Thursday 1:00 - 4:30p.m.


INTL 31918 / ANTH 31918 -- Anthropological Perspectives on U.S. Foreign Policy

Professor Ozdemir
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 6:00 - 9:00p.m.

 


Development

SOC 31154 – Undocumented: Living in the Shadows

Professor Sloan
Tuesday, Thursday 1:00 - 4:30p.m.


INTL 31918 / ANTH 31918 -- Anthropological Perspectives on U.S. Foreign Policy

Professor Ozdemir
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 6:00 - 9:00p.m.

 


International Public Policy

SOC 31154 – Undocumented: Living in the Shadows

Professor Sloan
Tuesday, Thursday 1:00 - 4:30p.m.


INTL 31918 / ANTH 31918 -- Anthropological Perspectives on U.S. Foreign Policy

Professor Ozdemir
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 6:00 - 9:00p.m.

 


International Relations

INTL 31918 / ANTH 31918 -- Anthropological Perspectives on U.S. Foreign Policy
Professor Ozdemir
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 6:00 - 9:00p.m.

Winter 2020 All A.G.I.S. Classes

The following are lists of all Winter 2020 Courses being offered across the Department of Anthropology, Gender Studies, and International Studies: 

 

ANTH 23100 -- Anthropology of Law

Professor Nieves
Fully online

 

ANTH 31140 -- Birthing Justice / Birth Injustice

Professor Rodriguez
Fully online

 

ANTH 31918 / INTL 31918 -- Anthropological Perspectives on U.S. Foreign Policy

Professor Ozdemir
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 6:00 - 9:00p.m.



 

WS 10000 -- Women’s Gender Roles in Contemporary Society

Professor Angel-Ajani
Online

 

WS 31126 -- Women Writing Culture

Professor Angel-Ajani
Online



Requirements 

Requirements for a Major

Students majoring in International Studies take a total of eleven required classes:


Four classes, taken by majors in all concentrations:
 

  • INTL 20100, International Studies: A Global Perspective
     
  • INTL 30500, Social Foundations of International Studies
    • INTL 20100 is a prerequisite for INTL 30500.
       
  • SSC 31117, Internship Seminar
    • Students who declared I.S. in the Fall of 2019 and on have the option to take Internship Seminar as one of their electives, but it is required for students who have declared the major anytime before the Fall 2019 semester. For information on registering for Internship Seminar, students should visit the course website
       
  • INTL 32100, Senior Seminar
    • Prerequisites for INTL 32100 include: INTL 20100, INTL 30500, a methods class, and a theory class.
    • With permission of the Program Director, students may substitute INTL 32100, Senior Essay, for this requirement. For more information about Senior Essay, please visit this page

 

One of the following methods classes

  • ECON 20150, Principles of Statistics
  • INTL 31107, Research Methods in International Studies
  • PSY 21500, Applied Statistics
  • SOC 23200, Methods and Techniques of Sociological Research
  • ANTH 24800, Fieldwork Methods in Cultural Anthropology

 

One of the following theory classes, corresponding to the concentration

  • Culture and Communications concentrators choose either ANTH 20100, Cross-Cultural Perspectives or INTL 31108, Transnational Feminisms
  • Development concentrators take PSC 20200, International Political Economy
  • International Public Policy concentrators take PSC 12500, Introduction to Public Policy
  • International Relations concentrators take PSC 25200, Theories of International Relations

 

Six advanced electives (Five electives if you declared the major before Fall 2019)

Students choose five advanced (20000-level or higher) classes that contribute to their concentration. The five classes must be drawn from at least three different disciplines (in other words, they must have course numbers beginning with at least three different departmental or program prefixes, such as ANTH, ECON, INTL, PSC, SOC, etc.).

 

The Program posts lists of upcoming classes that count toward each of the concentrations on the website

Areas of Concentration

All students majoring in International Studies must choose one of the following four areas of concentration:

 


Culture and Communication

 

Culture and Communication is the broadest of the four concentrations and gives students a framework for studying the ways that cultural and historical dynamics shape social, political, and economic relations across the globe. Many students with a concentration in Culture and Communication go on to pursue careers in fields such as education, human rights, journalism, law, and international NGOs.

 


Development

 

Students with a concentration in Development learn how the economic possibilities of people around the world today have emerged out of centuries of global political and economic relations. Many students with a concentration in Development go on to pursue careers in fields such as economic policy and international NGOs.



International Public Policy

 

The concentration in International Public Policy helps students develop the skills needed to formulate and advocate policies on key international issues. Students with this concentration frequently pursue careers in think tanks, non-profit organizations, foreign policy, and international governance.

 


International Relations

 

Students in International Relations focus on the interactions between nation-states and within international political institutions such as the United Nations. This concentration gives students the background to pursue careers in international governance and diplomacy.

International Studies Degree Map

 

  Updated Spring 2018 

 

Course Number Course title Credits

 

First Year Fall

   
FIQWS 100XX Freshman Inquiry Writing Seminar        3
FIQWS 101XX    Composition for Freshman Inquiry Writing Seminar                          3
  General Education  3
Speech 10100  General Education  3
  General Education  3
  Total credit hours for semester 15
     
First Year Spring    
  Writing for the Social Sciences 3
  General Education 3
ENGL 21002    General Education 3
  General Education--Math 3
  General Education 3
  Total credit hours for semester 15
     
Second Year Fall    
   International Studies: A Global Perspective  3
  International Studies Theory Course (see list, below) 3
INTL 20100  General Education 3
  General Education 3
  General Education 3
  Total credit hours for semester 15
     
Second Year Spring    
  International Studies Methods Course (see list, below)  3 or 4
  Concentration elective (see note, below)  3
INTL 30500  Social Foundations of International Studies 3
  Free elective 3
  Free elective 3
  Total credit hours for semester 15 -16
     
Third Year Fall    
  Internship Seminar       3
  Concentration elective (see note, below)   3
SSC 31117   Concentration elective (see note, below)   3
  Free elective     3
  Free elective     3
  Total credit hours for semester 15
     
Third Year Spring    
  Concentration elective (see note, below) 3
  Concentration elective (see note, below) 3
  Free elective    3
  Free elective    3
  Free elective    3
  Total credit hours for semester 15
     
Fourth Year Fall    
  Senior Seminar or Senior Essay    3
  Free elective  3
INTL 32100 or 32200 Free elective  3
  Free elective  3
  Free elective  3
  Total credit hours for semester 15
     
Fourth Year Spring    
  Free elective  3
  Free elective  3
  Free elective  3
  Free elective  3
  Free elective  3
  Total credit hours for semester  15

 

 

 

International Studies Methods classes (all majors choose one, regardless of concentration)

 

ECON 20150  Principles of Statistics   4
INTL 31107  Research Methods in International Studies  3
PSY 21500 Applied Statistics  4
SOC 23200 Methods and Techniques of Sociological Research 3
ANTH 24800 Fieldwork Methods in Cultural Anthropology    3

 

 

 

International Studies Theory classes (all majors choose one, according to concentration)

 

Culture and Communications concentrators choose either:

ANTH 20100    Cross-Cultural Perspectives      3
OR    
INTL 31108  Transnational Feminisms      3

 

Development concentrators take:

PSC 20200      International Political Economy         3

 

International Public Policy concentrators take:

PSC 12500     Introduction to Public Policy        3

 

International Public Policy concentrators take:

PSC 25200  Theories of International Relations       3

 

 

Concentration electives

 

Students choose five advanced (20000-level or higher) classes that contribute to their concentration. The five classes must be drawn from at least three different disciplines (in other words, they must have course numbers beginning with at least three different departmental or program prefixes, such as ANTH, ECON, INTL, PSC, SOC, etc.). Each semester, the International Studies Program makes available a list of courses being offered that contribute to each concentration.

 

Senior Seminar/Essay

All students majoring in International Studies must take either Senior Seminar (INTL 32100) or register to write a Senior Essay (INTL 32200).***

 

Senior Seminar (INTL 32100)

Senior Seminar is a regular class in which you and your classmates will undertake a semester-long research project structured and guided by your instructor. The class is a capstone experience for International Studies majors and gives you the opportunity to draw on all of your college learning--theory, methods, regional and topical courses, and other experiences such as study abroad or internships.

To register for Senior Seminar, you need to be granted permission on CUNYfirst by emailing Dr. Muir (  smuir@ccny.cuny.edu  ) with your EMPLID.

 

 

Senior Essay (INTL 32200)

Senior Essay (often called Senior Thesis) is structured as an independent study class in which you design and execute a semester-long research project on a subject matter of your choosing. The project culminates in an essay, usually 35-50 pages in length.

To register for Senior Essay, you must first find a faculty member here at CCNY who is has expertise in your chosen subject matter and who agrees to serve as your mentor. Once you have secured a faculty mentor, the two of you should decide together how you will frame your research project, the methods appropriate to doing that research, a schedule of tasks for the semester, and the guidelines for the final essay. You then submit that information (in the format below) to Dr. Muir (  smuir@ccny.cuny.edu  ). If Dr. Muir approves your plan, then you and your mentor will sign a special form that will be submitted, along with the plan, to the Registrar.

 

 

The plan for your senior essay must be in the following format, typed in Microsoft Word and emailed to Dr. Muir (  smuir@ccny.cuny.edu  )

 

 

INSTRUCTIONS FOR INDEPENDENT STUDY/THESIS WRITING PERMIT

1.     Semester and year

2.     Professor’s name

3.     Student’s name and contact information (include the email address and phone number you most actively use)

4.     Title of course/study

5.     List of topics to be covered

6.     Reading list and reading assignments for each meeting

7.     Detailed schedule of in-person meetings

8.     Product(s) of course (homework assignments, papers, etc.)

9.     Grading method

 


*** Students must complete the requirements that were in place when they first declared their major. If you declared your major in International Studies earlier than approximately 2014, you may need to take Senior Seminar and write a Senior Essay. If you are in doubt, email Dr. Muir your EMPLID.