CCNY Courses on LGBTQ+ Topics

Please find here a list of courses (by semester) that include LGBTQ+ topics, case studies, and content. We recognize that terms are variable (and debated) so by LGBTQ+ topics, please understand that we warmly invite faculty, departments, and programs to list all courses that include LGBTQ+ content broadly defined, namely topics related to the fields of queer studies, topics/individuals/experiences related to gender diversity and/or sexual diversity and, of course, their many intersecting identities.  

Have a course you wish to be added? Please share with us the course title, course number, course days, time, and format (in person, hybrid, Hyflex, virtual) along with the instructor name, the instructor’s email, and the CUNYFirst description. Reach us at:  LGBTQ@ccny.cuny.edu  or fill out our Google Form here!

**Courses are alphabetized by Undergraduate/Graduate/PhD, then first listed department/program name, then course title, then courses from other CUNY campuses (made upon request by our CUNY colleagues).** 

Fall 2024

ANTH 20100: Cross-Cultural Perspectives (3 credits - Undergraduate

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), In Person/Online Asynchronous/Online Mix 

Instructor(s):

[19186-LEC] James Tolleson, In Person, Tuesdays, Thursdays, 9:30AM - 10:45AM

[19187-LEC] Adam Mikhail, In Person, Mondays, Wednesdays, 9:30AM - 10:45AM

[20855-LEC] Staff, In Person, Mondays, Wednesdays, 12:30PM - 1:45PM

[20859-LEC] Gregory Morton, In Person, Tuesdays, Thursdays 11:00AM - 12:15PM

[20860-LEC] Staff, In Person, Mondays, Wednesdays, 11:00AM - 12:15PM

[20874-LEC] Joan Lopez, Online Asynchronous 

[32374-LEC] James Tolleson, In Person, Fridays, 11:00AM - 1:30PM

[32375-LEC] Joan Lopez, Online Mix

 


 

ANTH 20200: Language in Cross-Cultural Perspective (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), In Person/Online Asynchronous 

Instructor(s):

[19220-LEC] Miriam Urízar, In Person Mondays, Wednesdays, 11:00AM - 12:15PM 

[20875-LEC] Luis Quesada Nieto, Online Asynchronous

Description: This course introduces students to the study of language from an anthropological perspective. Topics include the structure of language and its relationship to other kinds of communication; language use in face-to-face interactions; the relationship of language to class, race, ethnicity, gender, and other forms of social difference; and the role of language in mass-media

 


 

ANTH 21009: Black Women’s Resistance: Narratives of Safety and Survival (3 credits - Undergraduate)

BLST 21009: Black Women’s Resistance: Narratives of Safety and Survival (3 credits - Undergraduate)

WS 21009: Black Women’s Resistance: Narratives of Safety and Survival (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), In Person, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11:00AM - 12:15PM

Instructor: Shanelle Matthews 

Description: In the 20th and 21st centuries, the safety and survival of Black women have become central to rethinking public safety. The #SayHerName campaign exemplifies this shift, offering a platform for voices often marginalized by mainstream media. This course examines how Black women in the US, impacted by the intersection of patriarchal misogyny and anti-Black racism, face both hypervisibility and invisibility. Their experiences with public safety are often ignored, complicating discussions about state-sanctioned violence and their protection. We will explore how narratives around gender and race shape public safety perceptions and policies. Through videos, readings, podcasts, guest speakers, and discussions, this course investigates the role of narrative power and rhetoric in shaping the experiences and advocacy for the safety and freedom of Black women and girls. We'll analyze how these narratives impact their rights and the broader fight for their well-being and self-determination

 


 

ANTH 23600; Anthropology of Gender & Sexuality (3 credits - Undergraduate)

WS 24659: Anthropology of Gender & Sexuality 

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), In Person, Tuesdays, Thursdays, 2:00PM - 3:15PM

Instructor: Katherine Stefatos 

Description: This course explores how gender and sexuality are iterated, performed, challenged, and managed. Instead of seeing gender and sexuality as coherent and easily quantifiable categories, this class delves into the many contradictions in the categories of gender and sexuality in order to unpack everyday taken for granted assumptions. Furthermore, students will examine how these categories intersect, how they inform each other, and how they gain reaction with race, class, and ethnicity

 


 

ANTH 29607: Undocumented, Unafraid, Unashamed: The Power of the Immigrant Youth Movement 

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), Hybrid Asynchronous, Wednesdays, 2:00PM - 3:15PM

Instructor: Cristina Jimenez Moreta

Description: This class will explore how undocumented young people organized themselves, built a movement, disrupted immigration politics, and won policy change that changed the lives of thousands of people. The class is designed to look at the origins of the movement, the political conditions that shaped it, and the social justice movement lineages that inspired its leaders. With immigrant and refugee communities facing greater attacks and scapegoating this class will also explore the movement?s present strategies and its future

 


 

ANTH 31140: Birthing Justice

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), Hybrid Asynchronous, Wednesdays, 9:30AM - 10:45AM

Instructor: Griselda Rodriguez 

Description: This course explores how Birthing Justice is both an analytic framework and a social movement within the US. By focusing on the intersectional nature of oppression, students will learn how and why racial disparities in maternal health persist in the US. Lastly, and most importantly, the lives and voices of women of color who both advocate for Birthing Justice and who also experience Birth Injustice will be central to the course

 


 

ANTH 31403: Women and Violation of Human Rights

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), Hybrid Asynchronous, Mondays, 2:00PM - 3:15PM

Instructor: Burcu Ozdemir Demir

Description: TBA

 


 

ARCH 51510: Topics in the History of Architecture and Society (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), In Person, Wednesdays, 2:00PM - 4:50PM

Instructor: Cassie Shepard

Description: Various elective topics covering all times periods and geographic regions to fulfill required credits and concentration needs

Note: B. Arch Students only

 


 

BIO 37800: Science of Sex and Gender (3 credits - Undergraduate)

SOC 37800: Science of Sex and Gender

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), In Person, Tuesdays, Thursdays, 11:00AM - 12:15PM

Instructor: Christine Li; Maritsa Poros

Description: the course will explore the interactions among genes on the Y chromosome with genes on other chromosomes as determinants of biological sex. Sociologically, the course will investigate the social construction of gender and how gendered identities shape everyday life, including at the intersection of sex and gender (e.g., intersex and trans expressions of sex and gender)

 


 

BIO 46000: Animal Behavior (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), In Person, Tuesdays, Thursdays, 11:00AM - 12:45PM

Instructor: Osceola Whitney 

Description: The biological bases of behavior, with emphasis on such topics as the development, evolution, genetics and ecology of behavior; sensory physiology; social behavior and communication

Note: Requirements: PRE - BIO 10200 (MIN C)

 


 

BLST 31176: Cuban & Afro-Caribbean Cultures: Gender, Power, and Race (3 credits - Undergraduate)

LALS 31176: Cuban & Afro-Caribbean Cultures: Gender, Power, and Race 

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), Online Synchronous, Mondays, Wednesdays, 9:30AM - 10:45AM

Instructor: Dorothy Bell

Description: With a focus on the intersection of gender, power, and race as essential dimensions of cultural and societal experience, this interdisciplinary course explores the cultural, historical, and social aspects of Cuba and other Afro-Caribbean societies. The course begins with the historical roots of Cuban and Afro-Caribbean cultures, exploring the impact of colonialism, slavery, racial discrimination, and independence on the region and how cultural traditions have been used to resist and challenge these forces. Topics include the impact of revolutionary movements, the role of the state in shaping artistic expression, the influence of political ideologies on the cultural landscape of these spaces, and how broader historical and political events have influenced these cultural experiences. Students will engage with various sources, including historical documents, social science studies, literature, music, film, and visual art. Designed for students interested in interdisciplinary approaches to studying culture, history, and society, as well as students interested in Latin America and the Caribbean, gender and women’s studies, African diaspora studies, and cultural anthropology, the course will challenge students to think critically about how gender, power, and race intersect in shaping cultural experiences and to develop their analytical and interpretive skills
 



BLST 31972: AFRICANS IN HARLEM (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), In Person, Tuesdays 10:00AM - 12:30PM

Instructor: Boukary Sawadogo

Description: Africans are not the face of immigration debates in the United States as has traditionally been the case of other migrant and diasporic groups. Yet, Sub-Saharan African émigrés are growing in many places, doubling their number every ten years since the 1980s to reach two million in 2019. Nowhere is this more vibrant than in the historically Black neighborhood of Harlem in New York City. The first major wave of West African immigrants—Senegalese, Malians, and Guineans—moved to Harlem in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Prior, Ethiopian refugees, African students and diplomats in the 1960s and 1970s had already made Harlem their home. The course examines stories and experiences of African-born migrants and their varied and dynamic influences on Harlem. Also, Africa and Black Americans have historically fostered exchanges in and around Harlem as evidenced by connections made during the Harlem Renaissance and solidarity movements. The course uses different materials and resources, including literary texts, films about and/or set in Harlem, and visits to communities, historical sites, and cultural institutions

 


 

ENGL 27000: Literatures of Diversity (3 credits - Undergraduate) 

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), In Person, Mondays and Wednesdays, 11:00AM - 12:15PM

Instructor: Keyon Willis 

Description: This course introduces majors to the themes and discussion of issues surrounding writings from non-canonical or underrepresented groups

Note: Requirements: BOTH PARTS OF ANY FIQWS OR ENGLISH 11000

 


 

ENGL 36504: Contemporary Women Writers (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), Online Asynchronous

Instructor: Kathleen Mcdonald 

Description: Thiscourse will present opportunities to analyze and interpret a diverse set of recent novels, short stories, poetry, and essays by women writers that contribute to our sense of the material realities of women's lives within the context of the personal and the political, the domestic and the global. We will consider the ways in which these writers portray issues such as intimacy, sexuality, home, place, empowerment, and self-invention, as well as how they chronicle migration, illness, care, loss, violence, division, connection, and success. By reading a diverse spectrum of writers, we'll enlarge our sense of what is possible and what is significant in women's writing today

Note: Students who want permissions for this course can request them here: https://form.jotform.com/222995305110955 The course is offered under the auspices of the Department of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences. https://www.ccny.cuny.edu/cwe

 


 

HIST B8015: Gender, Sexuality, and Power in Atlantic Africa (3 credits- Graduate)

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), In Person, Mondays, 4:50PM - 6:50PM

Instructor: Yaari Felber-Seligman 

Description: Along with the growing recognition of Africans? dynamic roles in shaping the Atlantic world has come attention to the many complex ways that these encounters have shaped African societies. Featuring new, innovative scholarship, this course delves into the entangled histories of ideas of gender, sexualities, and power as they developed in Atlantic Africa between the 15th-20th centuries. Ideal for any students interested in Atlantic world, African, or comparative histories, our case studies reveal that often these themes were central to both individuals and to societies? strategies of politics, economics, colonialism, resistance, and spirituality

Note: ZERO Textbook Cost

 


 

HNSC. 4153: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Health (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21) In Person/Online Asynchronous (Brooklyn College) 

Instructor: Nic Rios

Description: 3 hours; 3 creditsDevelop an understanding of historical and contemporary health issues facing sexual minorities (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer). Topics include factors that contribute to negative health outcomes in LGBT populations related to mental health, HIV/STIs, substance use, smoking, certain types of cancer, and victimization. HNSC 4153 and WGST 3608 are the same course.Prerequisites for HNSC 4153: HNSC 1100; and a prerequisite or co-requisite of HNSC 2181Prerequisites for WGST 3608: HNSC 2181

Note: SAME AS WGST 3608

 


 

INTL 20600: Global Social Theory (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21) In Person/Online Asynchronous 

Instructor(s):

[21487-LEC] Dora Suarez, In Person, Mondays, Wednesdays 3:30PM - 4:45PM

[21489-LEC] Dora Suarez, Online Asynchronous

Description: This course is designed to introduce International Studies majors to key questions and concepts in the social sciences. Over the semester, students engage with the wide variety of texts?by authors from around the world?that together comprise global social theory. The focus is on learning how to read these texts carefully with an eye toward using them to analyze the contemporary world. In particular, the class asks students to explore the following questions: What does it mean to understand humans as thoroughly social, cultural, and historical creatures? How do humans create, maintain, and transform their social worlds? How are forms of social difference (e.g. race, class, ethnicity, language, citizenship, gender, sexuality, etc.) produced and how do they shape our experiences? In what sense is the contemporary world shaped by particular pasts? What historical transformations lie on the horizon?

 


 

 

INTL 21016: Geographies of Violence (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), In Person, Tuesdays, Thursdays, 11:00AM - 12:15PM

Instructor(s):

Omnia Ibrahim Khalil

Description: In this class, we will study ways of thinking about the meanings of violence, when it is legitimate and when it is not, and what differentiates it from resistance. Through the geographies of the world, we will study how violence has been shaped by the history of nation-state formation and the roles it plays in politics as well as in economic and social life. Students will also examine case studies on gender-based violence, and violence in religious and racial formations.

 


 

INTL 31140: Human Mobility and Social Change (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), In Person, Mondays, Wednesdays 9:30AM - 10:45AM

Instructor: Maritsa Poros

Description: This course explores the causes, patterns and impacts of human migration and social change, including forced migration, displacement and the experiences of refugees. Themes will include: theories of migration; globalization, development and migration; securitization of immigration; human smuggling and trafficking; racism and exclusion; transnationalism and diasporas; conflict, the environment and forced migration; and austerity and mass expulsion. The class will offer a global perspective as well as focusing on American immigration

 


LALS 13100: The Hispanic Urban Child (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), Online Mix, Mondays, 6:30PM - 7:45PM

Instructor: Lucia Brea

Description: A survey of the sociological, psychological and educational needs of Hispanic children in the New York City public schools. Emphasis will be given to the study of language problems, family structure, race relations and community life.

 


 

LALS 31112: Daughters of Immigrants: Inequality & Social Mobility (3 credits - Undergraduate) 

WS 31112: Daughters of Immigrants: Inequality & Social Mobility (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), In Person, Mondays, Wednesdays 2:00PM - 3:15PM

Instructor: Norma Fuentes-Mayorga

Description: Key themes of this course are social mobility and inequality in both the U.S. and Latin American context. While the course provides an overview of the immigration experience for Latino youth in general, it has a special emphasis on the experience of Latina women and girls

 


 

LALS 31118: Racialization: Single Mothers, Sexual and Religious Minorities (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), In Person, Mondays, Wednesdays 11:00AM - 12:15PM

Instructor: Norma Fuentes-Mayorga 

Description: This course offers an introduction to the study of minority and majority group relations in the United States with a comparative focus drawing from examples in Latin America and Europe. We examine the historical factors that have led to the creation of a white majority and a black minority in America and other national contexts; how a minority or majority status is created and internalized by individuals and their youth. We pay close attention to how increasing economic and wealth inequality, globalization and immigration affects the formation of new, minority groups and statuses drawing on the example of growing share of working poor or 'missing class' individuals in America; the life chances of the undocumented, and those of single migrant mothers, religious minorities such as Muslim youth and the networks of sexual minorities that help them integrate in society and cope with glaring discrimination and exclusion. Students will be able to engage in informed debates about how increases in family, ethnic, racial and sexual diversity in the US and other nations will help close the historical divides between white and black groups in America. They will also master new knowledge on how race and racialization processes take place in Latin America or in nations such as Brazil and the Dominican Republic where efforts have been made to alleviate racial inequality and tensions, but where blacks and mulattoes have historically make up the majority of the poor and whites and light-skin people still make up the ruling elite

 


 

LALS 31174: Latinx Youth & Social Justice (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), In Person, Mondays, Wednesdays 11:00AM - 12:15PM

Instructor: Carlos Encina Oleart

Description: What is social justice? What does social justice (and injustice) mean in the context of a diverse, global city like New York? We will address these questions by examining how our ideas about justice and injustice measure up against the everyday experiences of people from different social groups in urban contexts from the U.S. and around the world. The course will provide a survey of classic and contemporary ethnographies of urban life (qualitative case studies relying primarily on observation), with an emphasis on relationships of power, privilege, and inequality, and a special focus on Latinx communities and the immigrant experience

Note: SEEK STUDENTS ONLY

 


 

LALS 31147: Latinx Media Studies (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), In Person, Mondays, Wednesdays 5:00PM - 6:15PM

Instructor: Isvett Verde

Description: This course is cross listed with Latinx Media Studies MCA 31147. (Course ID# 152316)

 


 

MCA 31147: Latinx Media Studies (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), Hybrid Synchronous, Mondays, Wednesdays 5:00PM - 6:15PM

Instructor: Staff

Description: This course is part of the NBCU Academy Fellows Program. The Latinx population in the U.S. reached a record 60.6 million in the United States in 2019. That means those of Latinx descent account for 18 percent of the U.S. population, according to Pew Research. Yet mainstream media often fails to reflect the serious concerns of the fastest growing segment of the population. This course will analyze and explore the way mainstream news organizations report about Latinx issues and depict and represent Latinx people. It will examine cultural icons and stereotypes and look at how Latinx media deals with the same subjects. The class will also cover social media's role in informing, and also disinforming, the Latinx community in the U.S. and throughout the world

 


 

MCA 31133: African Cinema: Gender and Culture (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), In Person, Mondays, 10:30AM - 11:45AM

Instructor: Staff

Description: Changes in African cinema reflect an emerging trend challenging established cultural norms about gender roles, homosexuality, transgenderism, and female power. Topics that were once considered taboo are now brought to light and communities are now self-examining their own practices and beliefs. In this regard, the course aims to showcase the diversity of social practices and beliefs by focusing on African communities but also engage students in the debates about how the film medium can effect social change. The film corpus under study is representative of the geographical and linguistic differences in African productions

 


 

PSC (NUMBER TBA): Social Change through Law and Policy (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), Hybrid, Mondays, 5:30PM - 7PM

Instructor: Kevin Jennings

Description: This course examines how policy and law can create social change with a focus on lessons from the modern LGBTQ+ movement in the United States. We look at how movement leaders and organizers have deployed different strategies over time in its quest for equality and justice. The course will examine differences and similarities between early efforts in the 50's and 60's to combat the pervasive discrimination against LGBTQ+ people; the community's response to the AIDS epidemic in the 80's and 90's; efforts to win marriage equality; and the current battles around trans rights. Course materials will include both print and film resources and the instruction will be seminar-style.

 


 

PSY 31158: Queer Psychology (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), Online Asynchronous 

Instructor: Carmen Garcia 

Description: What is queerness and what does it have to do with psychology? In this course, we will attempt to “queer” psychology by applying a critical lens to psychology’s study of sexuality and gender. Together, we will examine issues of queerness, identity, physical and social environments within the field of psychology

 


 

PSY 31191: Decolonizing Mental Health (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), In Person, Wednesdays, 6:30PM - 9:00PM

Instructor: Lewis Zuchman 

Description: Decolonization is the process of deconstructing colonial ideologies of the superiority and privilege of Western (White Patriarchal) thought and approaches. While decolonization is generally considered in reference to geo-political systemic structures, its applicability to mental health service delivery is of critical import to psychology. Colonization perpetuates the status quo, maintaining power dominance of a White, Patriarchal, Racist, Homophobic hierarchy. Western mental health and social service methodologies serve to perpetuate colonization, justifying the dominance of a White, Patriarchal systemic structure. This course will serve to examine the systemic implication of a mental health service delivery that ?blames the victim?, and perpetuates an oppressive systemic culture that deleteriously impacts the lives of women, immigrants, folk of color, LGBTQ folk, etc. Western mental health focuses on pathology, branding traumatized and oppressed folk as ?ill?, mentally unbalanced, paranoid, ?out of control?, etc. Decolonizing mental health service delivery enables the psychology student to focus on a Strength Based approach, that emphasizes ?positives?, and, employs a non-directive, empowering therapeutic stance. The psychologist/therapist is neither god, nor more powerful all-knowing. Rather, a decolonizing mental health approach emphasizes the partnership of therapist and patient. The therapist listens, shares, participates in full partnership with his/her patient. Illuminating this course will be the writings and clinical practice of Frantz Fanon, an Afro-French psychiatrist and 1960?s spokesperson of the successful Algerian Revolution against French colonial oppression. Finally, the empowerment process inherent in therapeutic healing, is embedded within an understanding of context and trauma. Oppressed folk reflect rage, resistance, as well as internalization of said oppression, resulting in self-destructive behavior. Enabling such folk to see, feel, and comprehend their oppression is a critical first step in healing.

 


 

PSY B9904: Decolonizing Mental Health (3 credits - Graduate)

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), In Person, Wednesdays, 6:30PM - 9:00PM

Instructor: Lewis Zuchman 

Description: Decolonization is the process of deconstructing colonial ideologies of the superiority and privilege of Western (White Patriarchal) thought and approaches. While decolonization is generally considered in reference to geo-political systemic structures, its applicability to mental health service delivery is of critical import to psychology. Colonization perpetuates the status quo, maintaining power dominance of a White, Patriarchal, Racist, Homophobic hierarchy. Western mental health and social service methodologies serve to perpetuate colonization, justifying the dominance of a White, Patriarchal systemic structure. This course will serve to examine the systemic implication of a mental health service delivery that 'blames the victim', and perpetuates an oppressive systemic culture that deleteriously impacts the lives of women, immigrants, folk of color, LGBTQ folk, etc. Western mental health focuses on pathology, branding traumatized and oppressed folk as 'ill', mentally unbalanced, paranoid, 'out of control', etc. Decolonizing mental health service delivery enables the psychology student to focus on a Strength Based approach, that emphasizes 'positives', and, employs a non-directive, empowering therapeutic stance. The psychologist/therapist is neither god, nor more powerful all-knowing. Rather, a decolonizing mental health approach emphasizes the partnership of therapist and patient. The therapist listens, shares, participates in full partnership with his/her patient. Illuminating this course will be the writings and clinical practice of Frantz Fanon, an Afro-French psychiatrist and 1960's spokesperson of the successful Algerian Revolution against French colonial oppression. Finally, the empowerment process inherent in therapeutic healing, is embedded within an understanding of context and trauma. Oppressed folk reflect rage, resistance, as well as internalization of said oppression, resulting in self-destructive behavior. Enabling such folk to see, feel, and comprehend their oppression is a critical first step in healing 

 


 

PSY 31195: Sociology of Mental Health (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), In Person, Tuesdays, Thursdays, 3:30PM - 4:45PM

Instructor: Erela Portugaly

Description: This course investigates the complex social and cultural processes that shape our experiences and meanings of mental health. The course will begin by outlining a sociological approach to mental health distinguished from psychological and biomedical models. Special attention will be paid to how experiences of mental health intersect with axes of race, class, gender, and sexuality, and to understanding the psychological traces of histories of colonialism, slavery, war, and migration. Students will use the course methodologies and theories to trouble normative concepts of health and wellness in order to arrive at alternative definitions of health and healing. The course is interdisciplinary in scope and will draw on frameworks of mental health from diverse fields including medical sociology, affect theory, critical race theory, feminist and queer theory, and disability studies to explore the entanglements between our psychic lives and social words

 


 

PSY 32400: Psychologies of People in Place: From Climate Change to Gentrification (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21) Online Asynchronous

Instructor: Christopher Hoffman

Description: How do we understand the interactions between ourselves and the places in which we live, study and work? Do these places affect who we are? What happens when natural disasters impact our communities? What happens when rising rents push us out of our neighborhoods? Are our identities impacted? In this course we will study basic concepts of Environmental Psychology and apply them to human situations

Note: ZERO Textbook Cost

PRE: PSY 10101 OR 10200 AND PSY 24700 OR 24900 OR PSY 22600 OR PSY 24600.CO: PSY 32100

 


 

PSY 35100: Psychology of Human Sexual Behavior (3 credits - Undergraduate) 

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21) In Person/Online Asynchronous 

Instructor(s): 

[20305-LEC] Hayley Hancock, In Person, Tuesdays, Thursdays, 11:00AM - 12:15PM

[20304-LEC] Rhyan Toledo, Online Asynchronous

Description: Sexual behavior, attitudes, developments, and the consequences of the behavior are examined from a psychological perspective. Topics include historical and cross cultural view points, theories of human sexuality, gender roles, sexual dysfunction, sexual preference, psychological development of adult sexuality and aging sexuality

Note: ZERO Textbook Cost 

Requirements: PRE - PSYCHOLOGY 10101, OR 10200, 10299, AND 24700, OR 24900

 


 

PSY 35700: Community Psychology (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), Online Synchronous, Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6:30PM - 7:45PM

Instructor: Richard Clark

Description: The use of psychology in the solution of community problems, and the impact of social and psychological stressors is examined from a community-wide perspective. How can communities and neighborhoods be measured for mental health strengths and dangers? What kinds of preventive actions and strategies, and what kinds of treatment and programs can be taken on a community-wide basis to promote mental health?

Note: Requirements: PRE - PSYCHOLOGY 10101, OR 10200, 10299, AND 24700, OR 24900

 


 

PSY V5650: Gender and Psychopathy (3 credits - Graduate)

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), In Person, Mondays, 3:30PM - 6:00PM

Instructor: Brett Silverstein 

Description: The course will focus on theories and findings related to why specific psychological disorders tend to be much more prevalent among women and others tend to be much more prevalent among men. Readings will include theoretical work on gender, studies of the methodology used in relating gender and psychopathology, and research on the connection between gender and particular disorders, including perhaps depression, some anxiety disorders, disordered eating, autism, and conduct disorder

 


 

PSC 20800: American Political Thought (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), In Person, Mondays, 9:30AM - 10:45AM

Instructor: Mira Morgenstern

Description: The origins and development of American political thought from the Puritan times to the present. The course will include study of basic themes in American thought: the scope and bounds of legitimate government power, majority rule and minority rights, federalism and centralization, participatory democracy, checks and balances, religious freedom and separation of church and state. The course will include study of major political issues emergent since Reconstruction: race and gender issues, immigration, urbanization, multiculturalism, business-government relations, management of the American economy, and America's relationship to the world. Also counts as a political theory and philosophy course

 


 

PSC 22600: Ethnic and Racial Politics in the United States (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), In Person, Tuesdays, Thursdays, 2:00PM - 3:15PM

Instructor: Harold Forsythe

Description: An investigation of the political activities of various minority groups and the challenges of governing a plural society. The class also explores the immigrant experience as well as religious identities. Among the specific topics covered are ethno-racial political identities, political mobilization (i.e. social movements and interest groups), political attitudes, voting behavior, and public policies affecting minority groups
 



SOC 38210: Sociology of Gender (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), In Person, Mondays, Wednesdays, 12:30PM - 1:45PM

Instructor: Justin Beauchamp 

Description: Sociology of Gender
 



WS 10000: Women’s Gender Roles in Contemporary Society (3 credits - Undergraduate) 

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), In Person

Instructor(s):

[24972-LEC] Jasmina Sinanovic, Mondays and Wednesdays, 12:30PM - 1:45PM

[24974-LEC] Arielle Cribb, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11:00AM - 12:15PM
Description: An introduction to issues that arise when women's lives and gender roles become the focus of critical inquiry. How do different societies and academic disciplines define women? How do women's experiences vary in relation to factors such as race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, age and nationality? How have women resisted, adapted to, and transformed "women's space" in the United States and elsewhere? (W)

 


 

WS 31350: Black Power Women: Autobiography and Biography 

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), In Person, Tuesdays, Thursdays, 2:00PM - 3:15PM

Instructor: Arielle Cribb

Description: This course will examine the issues of race, politics, and gender through the narratives of Assata Shakur, Angela Davis, and Afeni Shakur. The exploration of each woman’s lived experiences illuminate the culture in which they made their choices to become political activists and in which their trials took place. We will also dissect the biases and prejudices of the larger culture, and the implications this held for each woman. We will supplement our readings of their autobiographies/biographies with womanist and feminist writings. Students will critically examine each narrative and supporting documents through class discussions and essays

Note: Low Textbook Cost

 


 

WS 31467: Post Trauma Recovery (PTR): Healing our communities (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), Online Synchronous, Saturday, 11:00AM - 1:45PM

Instructor: Sharon White-Harrigan 

Description: A in-depth look at the causes and effects of trauma through Incarceration/Reentry, Domestic/Intimate partner violence, Police Brutality, Grief, Substance Abuse and how to begin the process of healing

 


 

WS 31715: Black Art in Aids Age (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), In Person, Thursdays, 5:00PM - 7:50PM

Instructor: Tod Roulette 

Description: This course will examine African American history, literature, art, theater, performance, film and fashion. This interdisciplinary approach will examine, in particular, black gay men and the distinct creative and political identity they have created about race and sexuality. After the discovery of AIDS in 1981, gay men faced a great deal of prejudice, discrimination and isolation. One way they countered the exclusion, silence and hate, was through artistic mediums. Their creative responses to the dual prejudices of racism and homophobia will be discussed and analyzed with visits from men who created during the 80?s and 90?s and by viewing performances

 


 

WGST. 2100: Key Ideas in LGBTQ (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Fall 2024 (August 28 - December 21), In Person, Mondays, Wednesdays, 2:15PM - 3:30PM (Brooklyn College)

Instructor: Stephanie Bonvissuto 

Description: 3 hours; 3 credits Concepts, theories, and texts central to the study of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer experience: definitions of sex, gender, sexuality, sexual orientation; queer theory; intersections of sexuality, race, gender, ethnicity, (dis)ability, and class; study of LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer) politics, communities, identities, and new social movements; representations of gender and sexuality in popular culture, religion, arts, literature, and visual culture; examination of different disciplinary and methodological approaches. Prerequisite: Core Curriculum 1230 or WGST 1001 or permission of the coordinator

Note: CORE CURRICULUM 1230, OR WGST 1001 WITH A GRADE OF C OR HIGHER, IS REQUIRED TO TAKE THIS COURSE

 

Summer 2024

SOC 31925: Sexuality, Gender, and Disability (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Summer Session 1 (June 3 - July 1), Hybrid, Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays 2:30PM - 5:25PM

Instructor:  Siobhan Pokorney

Description: Drawing upon sociological, feminist, queer, and disability theories, this course examines the conceptualization, reproduction, and stratification of sexualities in different historical and cultural contexts; We explore how interactions among ideological, racial, religious interests have created normative systems of sexual classification that justify not only disciplinary systems of punishments and rewards, but also unequally distributed power among those who conform, innovate, or deviate from norms.

Note: LOW textbook costs.


ANTH 20100: Cross-Cultural Perspectives (3 credits - Undergraduate) 

Term/Time: Summer term, Online Asynchronous/Online Mix

Instructor(s): 

[1143-LEC] Bruce Burnside, Online Mix, Summer Session 2 (July 8 - August 2), Mondays, Wednesdays 11:00AM - 2:25PM

[1170-LEC] Joan Lopez, Online Asynchronous, Summer Session 1 (August 5 - August 23) 

Description: This class provides a general overview of the field of socio-cultural anthropology. As this class is an excursion into the field of socio-cultural anthropology, our main goal will be to understand, complicate, and theorize “culture.” Students are expected to leave with a fuller understanding of socio-cultural anthropology, ethnographic method, and the complexities of cultural life. The main questions in this class will be: What is culture? How do cultural practices vary across social contexts? How can culture be multiple and contradictory? What does ethnographic method look like to study culture? Students will leave this class with a greater grasp of the “culture” concept and ethnographic methodologies. 3 hr./wk.; 3 cr

 


 

ANTH 20300: Human Origins (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Summer Session 1 (August 5 - August 23) Online Asynchronous

Instructor: Julie Lozano 

Description: An introduction to biological anthropology, this course will explore the biological and cultural elements of what makes us human. The fossil record of our hominid ancestors and the behavior of our primate relatives will lead to considerations of human variation and issues of social consequence like race, genetics, and inequality

 


 

ANTH 23600: Anthropology of Gender and Sexuality (3 credits - Undergraduate) 

Term/Time: Summer Session 2 (July 8 - August 2), Online Asynchronous

Instructor: Katherine Stefatos 

Description: This course explores how gender and secuality are iterated, performed, challenged, and managed. Instead of seeing gender and secuality as coherent and easily quantifiable categories, this class delves into the nany contradictions in the categories of gender and secuality in order to unpack everyday taken for granted assumptions. Furthermore, students will examine how these categories intersect, how they inform each other, and how they gain raction with race, class, and ethnicity

 


 

ANTH 32100: Health Issues and Alternatives (3 credits - Undergraduate) 

Term/Time: Summer Session 1 (June 3 - July 1), Online Asynchronous

Instructor: Griselda Rodriguez

Description: A comparative and holistic study of concepts and practices of wellness and healing in various cultures. The course examines the origins, philosophies and applications of diverse cultures' healing systems to the prevention and treatment of selected dis-ease conditions. The class will also explore the many alternative modalities now available in this area.

 


 

COM 3082: Gender Communication (3 credits - Undergraduate) 

Instructor: Benjamin Gillespie 

Term/Time:

 [LEC-8223] Summer Session 1 (June 10 - July 11), Online Asynchronous

[LEC-8232] Summer Session 2 (July 15 - July 11), Online Asynchronous

*Brooklyn College

Description: This course examines the theories and applications of gender in various communication contexts. Areas to be studied include: basic gender communication theories, roles and stereotypes, gender differences in verbal and nonverbal communication, processes and socialization, images of gender in the media, gender considerations in education, the impact of gender on friendships and romantic relationships, and mixed group vs. same sex group interaction

Note: Prerequisite: COM 1010 or COM 2020

 


 

EDCE 5300C: Theories, Policies, and Programs for Emergent Bilingual Students (3 credits - Graduate)

Term/ Time: Summer Term, Online Mix

Instructor(s):

[2002-LEC] Devon Hedrick-Shaw, Summer Session 1 (June 3 - July 1) Mondays, Wednesdays, 5:00PM - 7:30PM

[2016-LEC] Kristy Dela Cruz, Summer Session 2 (July 8 - August 2), Tuesdays, Thursdays 5:00PM - 7:30PM

Description: This course explores the historical background policies, approaches, and theoretical foundations of bilingual education and other educational programs for immigrant, bilingual, and language minority students. It also considers the social, political, and economic context that surrounds the education of immigrant students in urban schools

 


 

EDCE 5700C: Mulit-Cultural Education (3 credits - Graduate) 

Term/Time: Summer term, Online Mix 

Instructor(s): 

[5734-LEC] Aminata Diop, Summer Session 1 (June 3 - July 1), Mondays, Wednesdays 5:00PM - 7:30PM

[2005-LEC] Jesus Fraga, Summer Session 1 (June 3 - July 1), Tuesdays, Thursdays 5:00PM - 7:30PM

Note: No textbook Costs

[2011-LEC] Aminata Diop, Summer Session 2 (July 8 - August 2), Tuesdays, Thursdays 5:00PM - 7:30PM

[2015-LEC] Jesus Fraga, Summer Session 2 (July 8 - August 2), Mondays, Wednesdays 5:00PM - 7:30PM

Note: No textbook Costs

Description: Analyzes the various components of a desirable education in a pluralistic society; provides opportunities for developing curriculum and strategies which reflect respect and dignity for all people; examines students' needs within a humanistic framework; critically examines instructional materials for bias. Includes 10 hours of fieldwork

 


 

ENGL 36906: #HotLaborSummer: Labor Movement/Working Class Rhetorics (3 credits - Undergraduate) 

Instructor: Olivia Wood

Term/Time:

Summer Session 2 (July 15 - July 11), Hybrid, Mondays and Wednesdays (in-person) Tuesdays and Thursdays (online), 8:30AM-11:05AM

Description: This course examines the theories and applications of gender in various communication contexts. Areas to be studied include: basic gender communication theories, roles and stereotypes, gender differences in verbal and nonverbal communication, processes and socialization, images of gender in the media, gender considerations in education, the impact of gender on friendships and romantic relationships, and mixed group vs. same sex group interaction

Note: Zero-cost textbooks

 


 

HIST 31220: Gender and Women in the Middle East (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Summer Session 2 (July 8 - August 2), Online Synchronous, Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays 11:30AM - 2:05PM

Instructor: Hamideh Sedghi 

Description: This course examines the history of women and gender from the rise of Islam to the spread of contemporary Islamic political movements. Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which religion shapes women's lives as well as the ways in which women shape religion, women's roles in political and social movements, gendered economic activities, and gender relations

 


 

INTL 20600: Global Social Theory (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Summer Session 2 (July 8 - August 2), Online Asynchronous 

Instructor: Dora Suarez 

Description: This course is designed to introduce International Studies majors to key questions and concepts in the social sciences. Over the semester, students engage with the wide variety of texts?by authors from around the world?that together comprise global social theory. The focus is on learning how to read these texts carefully with an eye toward using them to analyze the contemporary world. In particular, the class asks students to explore the following questions: What does it mean to understand humans as thoroughly social, cultural, and historical creatures? How do humans create, maintain, and transform their social worlds? How are forms of social difference (e.g. race, class, ethnicity, language, citizenship, gender, sexuality, etc.) produced and how do they shape our experiences? In what sense is the contemporary world shaped by particular pasts? What historical transformations lie on the horizon?

Note: Requirements: PRE-INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 20100

 


 

INTL 21014: Borders and Migration (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Summer Session 1 (June 3 - July 1), Online Asynchronous

Instructor: Ozden Ocak

Description: Migration has been a persistent subject of political debate and academic discussion in the post-war era. However, the meaning of the term, the field of study, and the political interventions it calls for have shifted over time. This course offers an overview of select issues in and approaches to the politics of borders and migration, including but not limited to "integration of immigrants," "development and migration," "transnational migration," and "border security."

 


 

INTL 31965: Decolonizing the Witch (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Summer Session 2 (July 8 - August 2), Online Asynchronous

Instructor: Griselda Rodriguez

Description: There is a current reclamation of the ?witch? or the ?bruja? as a source of socio-psychological resistance. The resurgence of Goddess-based ancestral practices across the world is a testament to a deep-seated need to transform existing oppressive structures. In this multidisciplinary course students will learn about the historical trajectory of the ?witch? as a source of feminist and feminine political resistance. Moreover, the course's focus on critical race theory will center witches of color as a way to disrupt the potential white-centric cooptation of the present resurgence of the Bruja.

 


 

LALS 29400: Queerness of Color: The crossing of Gendered, Racialized, and political boundaries (3 credits - Undergraduate)

[LEC-10197] Carlos Encina Oleart 

 


 

INTL 31180: El Gaga and Dominican Culture (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Summer Session 1 (June 3 - July 1), Hybrid Synchronous

Instructor: Jonathan De Oleo Ramos

Description: El Gaga: A Forbidden Expression of Afro-Dominican Culture," will explore this forbidden folkloric music and dance with African roots. The course will blend theory and practice. The former will expose students to historical, humanistic, and expressive perspectives on the artform. Students will also engage in hands-on sessions, becoming familiar with different aspects of the performance. The course will also feature interactions with experts and practitioners.


 

WS 29400: Queerness of Color: The crossing of Gendered, Racialzied, and political boundaries (3 credits - Undergraduate)

[LEC-1892] Staff

Term/Time: Summer Session 1 (June 3 - July 1), Online Asynchronous

Description: This course explores how Latin American and Caribbean queer diasporic cultures have assimilated, challenged, influenced, deconstructed, and/or transformed gender and sexual categories. We will review a constellation of case studies such as the San Francisco Gay Latino Alliance, the Young Lord Movement, the queer subversion in Mexican Chican@ art activism, and Latinx support for rights movements in the Trump era. To this end, Latinx and Queerness of Color... reviews critical theoretical selections, monographs, fictional accounts, visual art, and oral history in order to explore the new forms of identities and social movements emerging among queer Latino/a/x groups in America and the forms of oppression as well as resistance that these groups experience

 


 

LALS 31304: Power, Resistance, and Popular Protest: Social Movements in Latin American (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Summer Session 2 (July 8 - August 2), Online Asynchronous

Instructor: Carlos Encina Oleart 

Description: This course explores several key social movements that during the last decades have shocked the political, economic, and social foundations of countries such as Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico. Using social movements theories, this course delves into the roots, development, and implications of popular mobilization to resist neoliberalism and global capitalism

 


 

MUS 27104: Latin Popular Music (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Summer Session 1 (June 3 - July 30), Hybrid Asynchronous, Tuesdays, Thursdays 6:20PM - 8:00PM

Instructor: Carlos Velasquez Torres 

Description: A group of courses dealing with the history and literature of jazz

Note: Requirements: PRE - MUSIC 10100

Students who want permissions for this course can request them here: https://form.jotform.com/222995305110955 The course is offered under the auspices of the Department of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences. https://www.ccny.cuny.edu/cwe

 


 

PSC 31161: LGBTQ Politics (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Summer Session 1 (June 3 - July 1), Hybrid Synchronous, Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays 2:00PM - 5:00PM

Instructor: Staff; Karen Struening

Description: This course will explore LGBTQ protest, politics ,and policy from the end of WW II to the present. We will begin with the persecution of the LGBTQ community in the 1940s and 1950s and then examine how LGBTQ movements began, often as a response to discriminatory policing. We will explore early writings in Queer theory before examining the government neglect and the protests to it that accompanied HIV/AIDs. Our next step is to look at policies from the 1990s to the 2020s, with Clinton’s “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” in the Military to Bush’s Defense of Marriage Act to Marriage Equality under Obama. We will read several critical Supreme Court cases that decriminalized same-sex sexuality and cases that legalized marriage equality and allowed private businesses to discriminate against gay and lesbian couples. Finally, we will examine the most recent effort to politicize LGBTQ people, especially transgender individuals. Throughout this course, we will look at clashes within the LGBTQ movement between radical and liberal factions, women and men, the dominance of whiteness and efforts to be inclusive. In addition, we will examine how new modes of sociality developed by the LGBTQ movement have contributed to mainstream culture

 


 

PSY 24900: Psychology of Personality (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Summer Session 2 (July 8 - August 2), Online Synchronous, Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays 8:30AM - 11:00AM

Instructor: Seth Sebold 

Description: This course explores the determinants of personality from a variety of perspectives, including psychodynamic, behavioral, cognitive, and humanistic, while also exploring how personality is influenced by factors such as gender, ethnicity, and culture. Students come to appreciate different perspectives regarding how and why people differ from one another

Note: Requirements: PRE - PSYCHOLOGY 10200 OR 10299

 


 

PSY 31158: Queer Psychology (3 credits - Undergraduate) 

Term/Time: Summer Session 1 (June 3 - July 1), Online Asynchronous

Instructor: Carmen Garcia

Description: What is queerness and what does it have to do with psychology? In this course, we will attempt to “queer” psychology by applying a critical lens to psychology’s study of sexuality and gender. Together, we will examine issues of queerness, identity, physical and social environments within the field of psychology

 


 

PSY 32200: Psychology of Sexuality and Gender (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Summer Session 1 (June 3 - July 1), Online Synchronous, Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays 8:30AM - 11:00AM 

Instructor: Sebastian Cordoba 

Description: This course introduces theories and concepts regarding psychologies of gender and sexual diversity. We will review relevant research, and consider history, criminalization, pathologization, and depathologization of gender and sexual diversity. Students will gain a well-rounded background and will learn how this field of study relates to the present

 


 

PSY 35100: Psychology of Human Sexual Behavior (3 credits - Undergraduate) 

Term/Time: Summer Session 1 (August 5 - August 23) Online Asynchronous 

Instructor: Rhyan Toledo

Description: Sexual behavior, attitudes, developments, and the consequences of the behavior are examined from a psychological perspective. Topics include historical and cross cultural view points, theories of human sexuality, gender roles, sexual dysfunction, sexual preference, psychological development of adult sexuality and aging sexuality

Note: ZERO Textbook Cost

Requirements: PRE - PSYCHOLOGY 10101, OR 10200, 10299, AND 24700, OR 24900

 


 

PSY B9846: Psychology of Sexuality and Gender (3 credits - Graduate)

Term/Time: Summer Session 1 (June 3 - July 1), Online Synchronous, Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays 8:30AM - 11:00AM 

Instructor: Sebastian Cordoba 

Description: This course will introduce theories, concepts and epistemologies regarding the psychologies of gender and sexual diversity. We will review and evaluate some of the most relevant research on gender diversity (its history, appeal, benefits and limitations) and sexual diversity (its history, criminalization, pathologization, de-pathologization and current insights)

 


 

SOC 31152: Immigration and the Second Generation (3 credits - Undergraduate) 

Term/Time: Summer Session 1 (June 3 - July 1), Online Mix, Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays 8:30AM - 11:25AM 

Instructor: Jennifer Sloan 

Description: The second generation, native-born of foreign parentage, is often caught between two distinctive worlds of their immigrant parents and American society. The study of the second generation is a cutting-edge topic in the fields of immigration and ethnic and racial studies as they are making the transition from school to work. The course examines the ways in which children of immigrants are integrating into different US institutions, such as education, economy, politics, as well as American culture. A key concern is to examine existing theories of assimilation in terms of the similarities and differences between the old (turn of the 20th century) and new (post-1965) second generation. Another important issue is whether the children of immigrants are doing better than their parents educationally and occupationally, given the structural changes in American economy and society. In light of the current political debate about immigration policy, which directly affects the children of undocumented immigrants, the course will also cover this often overlooked group. Although the course will deal with the United States as a whole, the experience of children of immigrants who have grown up in New York will also be highlighted

Note: This course meets during Summer 1 (Jun. 3 - Jul. 1). There will be online synchronous class meetings 1-2 times per week during the scheduled class time (i.e., 8:30AM - 11:25AM). Please inquire with instructor Jennifer Sloan ( jsloan@ccny.cuny.edu ) if you have questions.

 


 

SPAN 31131: The Films of Pedro Almodovar (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Summer Session 1 (June 3 - July 1), Online Synchronous, Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays 5:30AM - 7:55AM 

Instructor: Carlos Riobo

Description: Pedro Almodovar is known today as the internationally acclaimed Spanish auteur whose cinema went from being transgressive and amateurish to winning major international awards. This dramatic arc may also be applied to society and culture in post-Franco Spain. This course will analyze selected films that may trace Spain's self-refashioning, beginning with Madrid's counter cultural movement known as La Movida in the early 1980s, through Spain's transition to democracy, to today. Topics to be discussed include: queer studies, feminist studies, the melodrama, the Hollywood Formula, and anxiety of influence. The films that we will analyze may include Pepi, Luci, Bom; Todo sobre mi madre; Entre tinieblas; Mujeres al borde de un ataque de nervios; La flor de mi secreto; Carne tremula; Todo sobre mi madre; Dolor y gloria; and Madres paralelas. This interdisciplinary course will be conducted in both English and Spanish to accommodate a diverse range of students. Assignments will include a midterm examination and a 8-12-page final paper

Note: Low Textbook Cost

 


 

WS 10000: Women’s Gender Roles in Contemporary Society (3 credits - Undergraduate) 

Term/Time: Summer term, Online Asynchronous 

Instructor(s):

[1888-LEC] Sharon White-Harrigan, Summer Session 1 (August 5 - August 23) 

[1887-LEC] Jasmina Sinanovic, Summer Session 2 (July 8 - August 2)

[1886-LEC] Asale Angel-Ajani, Summer Session 1 (June 3 - July 1), 

Description: An introduction to issues that arise when women's lives and gender roles become the focus of critical inquiry. How do different societies and academic disciplines define women? How do women's experiences vary in relation to factors such as race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, age and nationality? How have women resisted, adapted to, and transformed "women's space" in the United States and elsewhere? (W) 

Note: ZERO Textbook Cost

 


 

WS 31350: Black Power Women: Autobiography and Biography (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Summer Session 1 (June 3 - July 1), Online Asynchronous

Instructor: Arielle Cribb

Description: This course will examine the issues of race, politics, and gender through the narratives of Assata Shakur, Angela Davis, and Afeni Shakur. The exploration of each woman’s lived experiences illuminate the culture in which they made their choices to become political activists and in which their trials took place. We will also dissect the biases and prejudices of the larger culture, and the implications this held for each woman. We will supplement our readings of their autobiographies/biographies with womanist and feminist writings. Students will critically examine each narrative and supporting documents through class discussions and essays

 


 

WS 31713: Introduction to Women of Color Eco-Feminisims: Feminist Intersections with Other (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Summer Session 1 (August 5 - August 23) Online Asynchronous 

Instructor: Christelle Jasmin

Description: This course is designed to familiarize you with the major concepts at the intersection of environmental studies, animal studies, and food politics particularly as they are troubled by racialization, capitalism, colonialism, and sexism. We will survey contemporary and classic texts from a wide array of disciplinary, political, and personal perspectives. Through readings and discussions, you will be introduced to key theoretical concepts such as, environmental racism, slow violence, racial ecologies, total liberation, settler colonialism and racial capitalism. These topics will allow for critical examination of the connection?s human, non-human animals, and the earth have with various struggles

 

 

Spring 2024

 

UNDERGRADUATE

ART 31162/ B8062: Gender, Desire and the Gaze in Early Modern Visual Arts (3 credits - Undergraduate and Graduate)

Term/Time: Spring term, Online Synchronous, Tuesday 6:15PM - 9:05PM

Instructor: Molly Aitken

Description: The course takes a global perspective on gender and sexuality in early modern visual arts. In seminar style, we relate readings to a selection of artworks from Europe, Asia and the Islamic world to think about how early modern visual arts structured erotically charged vectors of looking and being looked at that confirmed, hyperbolized, instrumentalized and even made magic of gender norms. We look at gender play and the regulation of gender in and through the visual arts. The subject of gender before the advent of gender studies offers means to think outside of familiar frames of analysis, and the goal of taking a global perspective is to critique methods that developed primarily in relation to European art. A basic proposition will be that the visual arts have historically been gendered. The hope is to imagine new interpretive horizons


ANTH 20100: Cross-Cultural Perspectives (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Spring term, Online/ In person

Instructor(s):
[20521-LEC] Joan Lopez, Online Mix, Wednesdays 5PM - 6:15PM

[20571-LEC] Joan Lopez, Online Asynchronous

[20537-LEC] Bruce Burnside, In Person, Mondays and Wednesdays 9:30AM - 10:45AM

[20529-LEC] Rafael Munia, In Person, Mondays and Wednesdays 12:30PM - 1:45PM

[20540-LEC] staff TBA, Online Synchronous, Tuesdays and Thursdays 8AM - 9:15AM

[20536-LEC] James Tolleson, In Person, Tuesdays and Thursdays 9:30AM - 10:45AM

[20535-LEC] James Tolleson, In Person, Tuesdays and Thursdays 11AM - 12:15PM

Description: This class provides a general overview of the field of socio-cultural anthropology. As this class is an excursion into the field of socio-cultural anthropology, our main goal will be to understand, complicate, and theorize “culture.” Students are expected to leave with a fuller understanding of socio-cultural anthropology, ethnographic method, and the complexities of cultural life. The main questions in this class will be: What is culture? How do cultural practices vary across social contexts? How can culture be multiple and contradictory? What does ethnographic method look like to study culture? Students will leave this class with a greater grasp of the “culture” concept and ethnographic methodologies.


ANTH 20200: Language in Cross-Cultural Perspective (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Spring term, Online Synchronous, Tuesdays and Thursdays 9:30AM - 10:45AM

Instructor: Luis Quesada Nieto

Description: This course introduces students to the study of language from an anthropological perspective. Topics include the structure of language and its relationship to other kinds of communication; language use in face-to-face interactions; the relationship of language to class, race, ethnicity, gender, and other forms of social difference; and the role of language in mass-media


ANTH 20300: Human Origins (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Spring term, Online/In Person

Instructor:
[20538-LEC] Prash Naidu, In Person, Tuesdays and Thursday 11AM - 12:15PM

[20539-LEC] Julie Lozano, Online Asynchronous

Description: An introduction to biological anthropology, this course will explore the biological and cultural elements of what makes us human. The fossil record of our hominid ancestors and the behavior of our primate relatives will lead to considerations of human variation and issues of social consequence like race, genetics, and inequality


ANTH 23600: Anthropology of Gender & Sexuality (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Spring term, Online Synchronous, Mondays and Wednesdays 2PM - 3:15PM

Instructor: Katherine Stefatos

Description: This course explores how gender and sexuality are iterated, performed, challenged, and managed. Instead of seeing gender and sexuality as coherent and easily quantifiable categories, this class delves into the many contradictions in the categories of gender and sexuality in order to unpack everyday taken for granted assumptions. Furthermore, students will examine how these categories intersect, how they inform each other, and how they gain traction with race, class, and ethnicity


ANTH 31968: Language and Gender (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Spring term, Online Synchronous, Tuesdays and Thursdays 3:30PM - 4:45PM

Instructor: Andrea Ariza Garcia

Description: This course explores how language, gender, sexuality, power and identity are interwoven. Drawing on linguistic anthropology, critical sociolinguistics, feminist and queer theories, and ethnographic case studies, we’ll focus on topics such as gender identity, performativity and language use, ideologies of gender and language, sexual orientation, and processes of nationalism and globalization that are interwoven with gender and sexuality. The course will take an intersectional approach to all these topics, with a particular focus on intersectionality and Black feminism in week 11. The aim of this course is to think, reflect, and learn about ourselves as socio-historical and cultural beings permeated by linguistic interactions that reinforce and/or resist gender normativity.???


EDCE 5700C: Multi-Cultural Education (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Spring, Online/In Person

Instructor:
[43642-LEC] Aminata Diop, Hybrid Synchronous, Mondays 5:30PM - 8PM

[43656-LEC] Staff TBA, Online Synchronous, Mondays 5:30PM - 8PM

Description: Analyzes the various components of a desirable education in a pluralistic society; provides opportunities for developing curriculum and strategies which reflect respect and dignity for all people; examines students' needs within a humanistic framework; critically examines instructional materials for bias. Includes 10 hours of fieldwork


ENGL 36502: Literatures of Globalization: Forms of Transnational Intimacy (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Spring, In Person, Tuesdays and Thursdays 11AM - 12:15PM

Instructor: Ashna Ali

Description: This course introduces students to the concept of globalization through the frame of intimacy and emotions. What kind of new intimacies are born within transnational families that speak multiple languages? What kind of misunderstanding and alienation is produced when words like ?homosexual? do not exist in one language but are crucial to the identity and growth of a multilingual character? When families and communities are affected by tragedies born of capitalism, what can and cannot be talked about, and what is the effect of those silences? When adults are traumatized by poverty, war, colonization, or migration to the point of avoiding talking about their experiences, how do their children understand themselves emotionally and culturally? When traditional family units are unable to provide the necessary support structures to meet a young person's needs, what do those individuals have to do and understand to find different roots with their chosen kin? We?ll think together about issues of gender, sexuality, identity, food, and emotional connection through the novels and poetry that dramatize the impact of globalized experience


HIST 31089: African-American Cultural and Political History (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Spring, In Person, Mondays and Wednesdays 5PM- 6:15PM

Instructor: Laurie Woodard

Description: Throughout the 20th century, African Americans have employed a variety of strategies toward the attainment of social, political, and economic equality. At different historical moments, specific agendas, tactics, and participants have come to the forefront, yet the overall objectives remain the same. During the 1920s and 1930s, many African Americans put forth a fusion of cultural and political activism as the vanguard of the movement. We will explore the intersection between culture and politics during this period and examine its place within the larger struggle for equality. Using primary and secondary sources, this course will look beyond traditional literary models and present students with a deeper and more complete understanding of the complex and dynamic social, cultural, and political phenomenon known as the New Negro or Harlem Renaissance. The key themes the course will address are: Agency, Resistance, Self-determination, Citizenship, Political Activism, Gender, Sexuality, Color, Tactics, and Civil Rights. Students are required to complete weekly readings and audio, and visual assignments and to be prepared to discuss them in class. Students must also complete a final research project on a topic of their own choosing that culminates in a 15-page paper


INTL 21004: Model United Nations, Part II (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Spring, In Person, Tuesdays 5PM-7:15PM

Instructor: Rafal Szczurowski

Description: INTL 21004 (20547) is a course that combines theoretical knowledge about the UN with practical simulations of global diplomacy. We will analyze the practice of multilateral diplomacy through the prism of individual governments, their interests, and actions. We will also prepare to represent Albania at the NMUN conference, organize local simulations with CCNY MUN club, and volunteer for Future We Want MUN Conference


SOC 34100: Disability Studies (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Spring, In-Person, Mondays and Wednesdays 2:00PM - 3:15PM

Instructor: Jack Levinson

Description: Surveys this transformative interdisciplinary field, informed by critical approaches to race, gender and sexuality, which offers an approach to disability as a social, political, and cultural category and a personal identity and lived experience. Readings include current and historical material, theoretical and empirical, from the social sciences, humanities, and arts.


SOC 38209: Sociology of Sexualities - Sex, Love, Relationships, and Identity (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Spring, In-Person, Tuesdays and Thursdays 11:00AM - 12:15PM

Instructor: Justin Beauchamp

Description: Drawing upon sociological, feminist, queer, and disability theories, this course examines the conceptualization, reproduction, and stratification of sexualities in different historical and cultural contexts; We explore how interactions among ideological, racial, religious interests have created normative systems of sexual classification that justify not only disciplinary systems of punishments and rewards, but also unequally distributed power among those who conform, innovate, or deviate from norms.

Note: ZERO textbook costs.


PSY 24900: Psychology of Personality (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Spring, Online Synchronous, Tuesdays and Thursdays 9:30AM - 10:45AM

Instructor: Richard Clark

Description: This course explores the determinants of personality from a variety of perspectives, including psychodynamic, behavioral, cognitive, and humanistic, while also exploring how personality is influenced by factors such as gender, ethnicity, and culture. Students come to appreciate different perspectives regarding how and why people differ from one another


PSY 35100: Psychology of Human Sexual Behavior (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Spring, In Person

Instructor:
[20723-LEC] Rhyan Toledo, In Person, Tuesdays and Thursdays 9:30AM - 10:45AM

[20728-LEC] Rhyan Toledo, Online Asynchronous,

Description: Sexual behavior, attitudes, developments, and the consequences of the behavior are examined from a psychological perspective. Topics include historical and cross cultural view points, theories of human sexuality, gender roles, sexual dysfunction, sexual preference, psychological development of adult sexuality and aging sexuality

Requirements: PRE - PSYCHOLOGY 10101, OR 10200, 10299, AND 24700, OR 24900


PSY 35700: Community Psychology (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Spring, In Person, Mondays and Wednesdays 3:30PM - 4:45PM

Instructor: Ghina Abi Ghannam

Description: The use of psychology in the solution of community problems, and the impact of social and psychological stressors is examined from a community-wide perspective. How can communities and neighborhoods be measured for mental health strengths and dangers? What kinds of preventive actions and strategies, and what kinds of treatment and programs can be taken on a community-wide basis to promote mental health?

Requirements: PRE - PSYCHOLOGY 10101, OR 10200, 10299, AND 24700 OR 24900


PSY 31158: Queer Psychology (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Spring, Online Synchronous, Tuesdays and Thursdays 8PM - 9:15PM

Instructor: Carmen Garcia

Description: What is queerness and what does it have to do with psychology? In this course, we will attempt to “queer” psychology by applying a critical lens to psychology’s study of sexuality and gender. Together, we will examine issues of queerness, identity, physical and social environments within the field of psychology


THTR 21700: Queer Theater (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Spring, In Person, Tuesdays and Thursdays 3:30PM - 4:45PM

Instructor: Staff TBA

Description: Queer Theatre


WS 10000: Women’s Gender Roles in Contemporary Society (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Spring, In Person

Instructor:
[20440-LEC] Arielle Cribb, Mondays and Wednesdays 11AM - 12:15PM

[43351-LEC] Jasmina Sinanovic, Tuesdays and Thursdays 11AM - 12:15PM

Description: An introduction to issues that arise when women's lives and gender roles become the focus of critical inquiry. How do different societies and academic disciplines define women? How do women's experiences vary in relation to factors such as race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, age and nationality? How have women resisted, adapted to, and transformed "women's space" in the United States and elsewhere? (W)


WS 31012: LGBTQ History, Culture and Movements (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Spring, In Person, Tuesdays and Thursdays 2PM - 3:15PM

Instructor: Jasmina Sinanovic

Description: This course traces the history of LGBTQ people as well as struggles for recognition and acceptance both in the US and globally. With attention to how sexual identity intersects with race, class and gender, the course will examine how LGBTQ people can be placed within historical and political contexts. We will question how and why homosexuality became criminalized and the movements that led to decriminalization. We will spend a significant portion of the time on USA and Western Europe in the 19th and 20th century and the development of a contemporary LGBTQ movement. We will also look at how people of various gender identities and sexualities lived before and outside of European colonial context and explore how European colonization influenced changes in perception of people with gender variant identities and well as people outside of heteronormative sexual practices in their local communities.


WS 32459: Criminalization and Mass Incarceration (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Spring, Online Synchronous, Saturdays 11AM - 1:45AM

Instructor: Sharon White-Harrigan

Description: An in depth look at the systemic racism and classism that has fueled the pipeline of incarceration, the policies and practices of the carceral state and the continuous impact it has on the people


GRADUATE

ART 31162/ B8062: Gender, Desire and the Gaze in Early Modern Visual Arts (3 credits - Undergraduate and Graduate)

Term/Time: Spring term, Online Synchronous, Tuesday 6:15PM - 9:05PM

Instructor: Molly Aitken

Description: The course takes a global perspective on gender and sexuality in early modern visual arts. In seminar style, we relate readings to a selection of artworks from Europe, Asia and the Islamic world to think about how early modern visual arts structured erotically charged vectors of looking and being looked at that confirmed, hyperbolized, instrumentalized and even made magic of gender norms. We look at gender play and the regulation of gender in and through the visual arts. The subject of gender before the advent of gender studies offers means to think outside of familiar frames of analysis, and the goal of taking a global perspective is to critique methods that developed primarily in relation to European art. A basic proposition will be that the visual arts have historically been gendered. The hope is to imagine new interpretive horizons


HIST B8953: New Directions in World History (3 credits - Graduate)

Term/Time: Spring, Online Synchronous, Mondays 7PM - 9PM

Instructor: Yaari Felber-Seligman

Description: This course emphasizes new directions and previously neglected topics in the field of World History based on the instructor’s expertise. May include, but not limited to, histories of ancient non-western worlds, nomadic and sea-faring peoples, indigenous cultures, gender, LGBTQ individuals, everyday life, popular culture, and the so-called “Big History” that emphasizes broader, nonhuman planetary/environmental history as part of the curriculum. Class readings and assignments will emphasize new directions in research, practice, and pedagogy

Wintersession 2024

UNDERGRADUATE

 

ANTH 32600: Anthropology of Disability: From Memoir to Ethnography (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Winter, Online Mix, Tuesdays and Thursdays 2PM - 4:45PM

Instructor: Bernardo Spaulonci Chiachia M

Description: This course is one of the Department’s 300-level offerings and can fulfill the major requirement for one 300 level elective. It speaks to the Department’s commitment to addressing pressing issues and pursuing a public anthropology in its curriculum and also further develops the curriculum in medical anthropology because of the attention to trauma. It expands the Department’s cross-cultural offerings and addresses critical contemporary issues from an ethnographic and theoretical perspective that can have policy implications. It may be of particular interest to students looking toward careers in international contexts in fields such as development, humanitarianism, human rights or who wish to pursue professional work in the U.S. with populations fleeing from war and other contexts of violence


LALS 29400: Queerness of Color: The crossing of Gendered, Racialized and political boundaries (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Winter, Online Asynchronous

Instructor: Carlos Encina Oleart

Description: This course explores how Latin American and Caribbean queer diasporic cultures have assimilated, challenged, influenced, deconstructed, and/or transformed gender and sexual categories. We will review a constellation of case studies such as the San Francisco Gay Latino Alliance, the Young Lord Movement, the queer subversion in Mexican Chican@ art activism, and Latinx support for rights movements in the Trump era. To this end, Latinx and Queerness of Color... reviews critical theoretical selections, monographs, fictional accounts, visual art, and oral history in order to explore the new forms of identities and social movements emerging among queer Latino/a/x groups in America and the forms of oppression as well as resistance that these groups experience


PSY 31825 Psychology of love (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Term: Winter, Online Synchronous, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays 6:00PM - 9:20PM

Instructor: Mabel Gomez

Description: Psychology of love


SOC 31189: Abolitionist Sociology: Restoring Care and Connection in Oppressive Sys through Liberatory Frameworks (3 credits - Undergraduate)

Term/Time: Winter, Online Synchronous, Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays 1:30PM - 5:08PM

Instructor: Siobhan Pokorney

Description: In the US, contemporary institutions, such as schools, prisons, and healthcare organizations, underserved and even harm their constituents. How could these systems be re-imagined through Black Feminist Abolitionist movements so that they serve stakeholders? This course centers the voices of those ensnared in carceral systems and explores key conceptual frameworks, practices, and genealogies of abolition, especially in relation to Black and queer feminisms. This course delves into the relationship between dismantling prisons and other carceral systems, including, but not limited to, family regulation, immigration, capitalism, schools, psychiatry, and gender and family norms. In critiquing Social Work practice within progressive change movements and exploring Abolitionist Social Work, the course creates space for freedom dreaming and radical reimagining of our communities without oppressive and harmful systems


GRADUATE

PSY B9846: Psychology of Sexuality & Gender (3 credits - Graduate)

Term/Time: Winter, Online Synchronous, Days/Times TBA

Instructor: Staff TBA

Description: This course will introduce theories, concepts and epistemologies regarding the psychologies of gender and sexual diversity. We will review and evaluate some of the most relevant research on gender diversity (its history, appeal, benefits and limitations) and sexual diversity (its history, criminalization, pathologization, de-pathologization and current insights)

 

Fall 2023

 

 

BIO 37800: Science of Sex and Gender

 

Term/Time: Fall 2023 | In-Person | Monday and Wednesday 11:00AM - 12:15PM

Instructor: Maritsa Poros (she/her) and Christine Li

[cross-listed with SOC 37800]

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course will explore biological and sociological understandings of sex and gender. From the biological viewpoint, the course will explore the interactions among genes on the Y chromosome with genes on other chromosomes as determinants of biological sex. Sociologically, the course will investigate the social construction of gender and how gendered identities shape everyday life, including at the intersection of sex and gender (e.g., intersex and trans expressions of sex and gender). 

 


 

ENG 36904: Rhetoric of Social Movements - Queer Libration

Term/Time: Fall 2023 | In-Person | Monday and Wednesday 12:30PM - 1:45PM

Instructor: Olivia Wood (she/her)

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course examines the verbal and non-verbal rhetorical strategies of groups and individuals attempting to effect social change and the counter-strategies of those who oppose them. We look at how social movements attempt to transform perceptions of social reality, alter the self-perception of protestors, legitimize the movement, prescribe courses of action, mobilize for action, and sustain the movement. We begin by understanding how the rhetorics of social movements operate by looking at three time periods in the United States: the emergence of gay identity and early homophile societies (late 1800s-1960s), the emergence of the Gay Liberation movement post-Stonewall (1969s-1980s), and the response to the AIDS crisis (late 1980s-1990s). We then move to examining contemporary topics in LGBTQ+ studies, including the fight for marriage equality, anti-trans legislation, intersections of oppressions, LGBTQ+ content in schools, and others. Students will choose a contemporary topic in the fight for queer liberation and examine the rhetorical techniques used, from songs and slogans to television and social media.

NOTE: Zero Cost Textbooks

 

 


 

INTL 31116: Gender & Work

[cross-listed with SOC 31138]

Term/Time: Fall 2023 | In-Person | Monday and Wednesday 12:30PM - 1:45PM 

Instructor:  Chang Liu

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: Why is some work considered to be women’s vs. men’s work? Why are so few business leaders women and/or persons of color? How can working fathers be encouraged to take on more parenting responsibilities? This course explores sociological explanations for such gender inequalities by examining gendered work, gendered division of labor, and the intersection of race and gender in labor markers. The course also covers feminist critiques and other perspectives on waged and unwaged work under capitalism in the U.S., with insights from countries in the Global South.


 

LALS 29400: Queerness of Color: The Crossing of Gendered, Racialized, and Political Boundaries

Term/Time: Fall 2023 | Online-Asynchronous | Mondayvand Wednesday 9:30AM - 10:45AM 

Instructor:  Carlos Encina Oleart

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course explores how Latin American and Caribbean queer diasporic cultures have assimilated, challenged, influenced, deconstructed, and/or transformed gender and sexual categories. We will review a constellation of case studies such as the San Francisco Gay Latino Alliance, the Young Lord Movement, the queer subversion in Mexican Chican@ art activism, and Latinx support for rights movements in the Trump era. To this end, Latinx and Queerness of Color... reviews critical theoretical selections, monographs, fictional accounts, visual art, and oral history in order to explore the new forms of identities and social movements emerging among queer Latino/a/x groups in America and the forms of oppression as well as resistance that these groups experience.

 


 

 

PSY 31158: Queer Psychology

Term/Time: Fall 2023 | In-Person | Monday and Wednesday 6:30PM - 7:45PM

Instructor: Carmen Garcia

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: What is queerness and what does it have to do with psychology? In this course, we will attempt to “queer” psychology by applying a critical lens to psychology’s study of sexuality and gender. Together, we will examine issues of queerness, identity, physical and social environments within the field of psychology.

 


 

PSY 31914: LGBTQ+ Counseling

Term/Time: Fall 2023 | In-Person | Tuesday and Thursday 2:00PM - 3:15PM 

Instructor:  Hailey Wojcik

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course aims to empower clinicians to conduct culturally-competent, evidence-based clinical mental health care with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, non-binary, queer, intersex, and often unnamed gender-expansive communities. We will discuss historical and contemporary issues, as well as best practices and guidelines for mental health counselors working within youth, college/university, and hospital/healthcare settings. Students will also engage in self-reflection to examine the ways in which their own identities and experiences may influence therapist-client dynamics.

 

 


 

SOC 38210: Sociology of Gender

[cross-listed with INTL 31126]

Term/Time: Fall 2023 | In-Person | Monday and Wednesday 9:30AM - 10:45AM

Instructor: Justin Beauchamp (they/them, or any pronouns)

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course examines gender as social systems, with attention to how these have been used to categorize persons, impose or assert individual and collective identities, and justify inequalities across history and national and cultural contexts.

Throughout the course, we will both deconstruct and reconstruct our own conceptions of gender, with particular emphasis on the colonial, capitalist, white supremacist, cisheteropatriarchal underpinnings of our current Western understandings of gender (we will define all of these terms in class). We will cover topics ranging from Indigenous knowledges and experiences, to global notions of gender, to intersectionality, to gender norms and social roles in the U.S. context. Our analysis of gender will span various realms of society, including politics, media, education, families and relationships, law, the workplace, and much more. We will also have units on trans, non-binary, genderqueer, and other gender non-conforming identities and communities, including an analysis of the most recent wave of anti-trans rhetoric and legal action.

This course will be very participatory, and will require a great deal of conversation among the students in the class. As we know, our contemporary notions of gender are quite complex, and this course seeks to take a deep dive into understanding the historical, political, social, and economic components of how we think about gender as a construct.
 

NOTE: Zero Cost Textbooks

 


 

SOC 31160: Latinas and Reproductive Rights

[cross-listed with LALS 31300]

Term/Time: Fall 2023 | Online-Synchronous | Thursday 9:30AM - 10:45 AM

Instructor: Iris Lopez (she/her)

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: The course examines the historical, cultural, social, political and ethical issues surrounding reproductive health care for Latinas. Special emphasis is given to the denial of rights, especially cultural differences in prenatal care and overuse of the sterilization procedure for Latinas in previous decades in the United States.

 


 

SOC 31905: Sociology of Mental Health

Term/Time: Fall 2023 | In-Person | Tuesday and Thursday 5:00PM - 6:15PM

Instructor: Erela Portugaly, Ph.D. (she/her)

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course investigates the complex social and cultural processes that shape our experiences and meanings of mental health. The course will begin by outlining a sociological approach to mental health distinguished from psychological and biomedical models. Special attention will be paid to how experiences of mental health intersect with axes of race, class, gender, and sexuality, and to understanding the psychological traces of histories of colonialism, slavery, war, and migration. Students will use the course methodologies and theories to trouble normative concepts of health and wellness in order to arrive at alternative definitions of health and healing. The course is interdisciplinary in scope and will draw on frameworks of mental health from diverse fields including medical sociology, affect theory, critical race theory, feminist and queer theory, and disability studies to explore the entanglements between our psychic lives and social words.

 


 

SOC 31180: Disability Studies

Term/Time: Fall 2023 | In-Person | Monday and Wednesday 2:00PM - 3:15PM

Instructor: Jack Levinson (he/him)

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: Surveys this transformative interdisciplinary field, informed by critical approaches to race, gender and sexuality, which offers an approach to disability as a social, political, and cultural category and a personal identity and lived experience. Readings include current and historical material, theoretical and empirical, from the social sciences, humanities, and arts.

 

 


 

THTR 21700: Queer Theatre

Term/Time: Fall 2023 | In-Person | Tuesday and Thursday 3:30PM - 4:45PM

Instructor: Brandon Judell (he/him)

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: An exploration of LGBTQ identity as portrayed in predominantly American dramas of the past century. Students will learn about key figures and texts, starting with Oscar Wilde, followed by consideration of stereotypical and groundbreaking portrayals of queer people, as well as analyzing plays with themes of homophobia, self-hatred, acceptance, AIDS, familial interaction, and the evolution of the LGBTQ rights movement in a hetero-normative society.

 

 


  

THTR 31115: LGBT Film and Theatre

Term/Time: Fall 2023 | In-Person | Tuesday and Thursday 2:00PM - 3:15PM

Instructor: Brandon Judell (he/him)

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: A celebratory exploration of queer identity as portrayed in international theatre and films in the post-Stonewall era, from 1969 on.  We will explore presentations of both stereotypical and emancipated portrayals of gay people dealing with homophobia, self-hatred, acceptance, AIDS, familial interaction, and the evolution of the GLBT rights movement in a heteronormative society.

 


 

WS 10000: Women's Gender Roles in Contemporary Society

Term/Time: Fall 2023 | In-Person | Monday and Wednesday 12:30PM - 1:45PM

Instructor: Jasmina Sinanović (they/them)

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: An introduction to issues that arise when women's lives and gender roles become the focus of critical inquiry. How do different societies and academic disciplines define women, men and those who do not fit in either category? How does gendered experiences vary in relation to factors such as race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, age and nationality? How have women resisted, adapted to, and transformed "women's space" in the United States and elsewhere?

NOTE: Zero Cost Textbooks

 


 

WS 31130: LGBTQ+ Activism in U.S. History

Term/Time: Fall 2023 | Hybrid | Monday (asynchronous) and Wednesday (in-person) 11:00AM - 12:15PM

Instructor: Lindsay Zafir (she/her)

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course will focus on the history of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ+) social movements in the U.S. We will examine why the movement emerged in the middle of the 20th century and track the changing goals and strategies activists adopted over time. We will pay close attention to persistent conflicts over issues like revolution vs. reform; coalition vs. single-issue politics; difference vs. assimilation; and grassroots vs. professional organizations. Finally, we will look at the connection between LGBTQ+ movements and other movements on the left and right. In particular, we will trace the LGBTQ+ movement's relationship with movements for racial, gender, and economic justice as well as the ways LGBTQ+ activism shaped – and was shaped by – anti-gay and anti-feminist movements. We will end by thinking about the future of LGBTQ+ movements in our current moment of backlash.

 


WS 32463: Queer of Color Critique Towards Utopia

Term/Time: Fall 2023 | In-Person | Monday and Wednesday 9:30AM - 10:45AM

Instructor: Carlos Encina Oleart (he/him)

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: In What’s Queer About Queer Studies, editors say that queerness can never be presumed in advance. Queerness is not a cohere term, rather they would say, it is always in flux, reinventing itself as a process and identity. In this course, we will examine this assertion and ask, who is queer? Why are they queer? When are they queer? Beginning with Cathy Cohen and Roderick Furgeson we will learn the connections between the process of racialization and queerness. We will then move to theorists such as Jasbir Puar who examines the relationship between the Racial State and queerness. Finally, we will interrogate the relationship queer studies, and queer of color critique has with antiblackness and settler colonialism. We will end this course drawing on Jose Munoz’s theories on utopia in order to discuss the future of queer theory and its usefulness in the project of abolition, and in reimagining the world as we know it.

NOTE: Zero Cost Textbooks

 

Summer 2023

 

 

ANTH 21007: Sex and Gender in Latin America

[cross-listed with INTL 21007]

Term/Time: Summer Session 1 (4 Weeks) | Online-Synchronous | Monday and Wednesday 11:30AM - 2:25PM

Instructor:  Cecilia Salvi

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course is an introduction to the study of gender in Latin America and examines how ideas about personhood that emerged during the colonial period still inform social practices and political policy throughout the region. It takes an intersectional approach to understanding current feminist and disidencia movements against gender violence, for reproductive justice, and in favor of sex workers’ rights.

 

 


 

ANTH 23600: Anthropology of Gender & Sexuality

Term/Time: Summer Session 2 (4 Weeks) | Online-Asynchronous 

Instructor:  Katherine Stefatos

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course explores how gender and secuality are iterated, performed, challenged, and managed. Instead of seeing gender and secuality as coherent and easily quantifiable categories, this class delves into the nany contradictions in the categories of gender and secuality in order to unpack everyday taken for granted assumptions. Furthermore, students will examine how these categories intersect, how they inform each other, and how they gain raction with race, class, and ethinicity.

 

 


 

ENGL 35411: Sexuality, Festivity, and Animality in the English Renaissance

Term/Time: Summer Session 2 (4 Weeks) | Online-Synchronous | Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday from 2:30PM to 5:05PM

Instructor:  Robert Yates

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course surveys early modern texts to ask what roles sex and sexuality and celebrations and festivities play in constructing the concept of the animal (human and non-human)? This course will explore the strategies that early modern texts (poems and plays, religious and scientific tracts, works of political philosophy and household management) used to represent, categorize, know, and speak of and for animals (human and non-human). Scholarly essays, articles, book chapters, and the occasional book will invite us to consider how the early modern texts continue to live within works of history, theory, literary criticism, and popular culture. More particularly, we will investigate how critical writings form objects of study, such as sex and sexuality or ritual celebrations and festivities, through their engagement with the early modern texts we are reading

 

 


HIST 31220: Gender and Women in the Middle East

Term/Time: Summer Session 1 (4 Weeks) | Online-Synchronous | Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday 11:30AM - 2:05PM

Instructor:  Hamideh Sedghi

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course examines the history of women and gender from the rise of Islam to the spread of contemporary Islamic political movements. Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which religion shapes women's lives as well as the ways in which women shape religion, women's roles in political and social movements, gendered economic activities, and gender relations.

 

 


LALS 29400: Queerness of Color: The Crossing of Gendered, Racialized, and Political Boundaries

Term/Time: Summer Session 1 (4 Weeks) | Online-Asynchronous

Instructor:  Carlos Encina Oleart

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course explores how Latin American and Caribbean queer diasporic cultures have assimilated, challenged, influenced, deconstructed, and/or transformed gender and sexual categories. We will review a constellation of case studies such as the San Francisco Gay Latino Alliance, the Young Lord Movement, the queer subversion in Mexican Chican@ art activism, and Latinx support for rights movements in the Trump era. To this end, Latinx and Queerness of Color... reviews critical theoretical selections, monographs, fictional accounts, visual art, and oral history in order to explore the new forms of identities and social movements emerging among queer Latino/a/x groups in America and the forms of oppression as well as resistance that these groups experience.

 

 


 

PSC 31161: LGBTQ+ Politics

Term/Time: Summer Session 1 (4 Weeks) | Hybrid (in-person and synchronous) | Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday 2:30PM - 5:30PM 

Instructor:  Karen Struening (she/her)

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course will explore LGBTQ protest, politics ,and policy from the end of WW II to the present. We will begin with the persecution of the LGBTQ community in the 1940s and 1950s and then examine how LGBTQ movements began, often as a response to discriminatory policing. We will explore early writings in Queer theory before examining the government neglect and the protests to it that accompanied HIV/AIDs. Our next step is to look at policies from the 1990s to the 2020s, with Clinton?s ?Don?t Ask, Don?t Tell? in the Military to Bush?s Defense of Marriage Act to Marriage Equality under Obama. We will read several critical Supreme Court cases that decriminalized same-sex sexuality and cases that legalized marriage equality and allowed private businesses to discriminate against gay and lesbian couples. Finally, we will examine the most recent effort to politicize LGBTQ people, especially transgender individuals. Throughout this course, we will look at clashes within the LGBTQ movement between radical and liberal factions, women and men, the dominance of whiteness and efforts to be inclusive. In addition, we will examine how new modes of sociality developed by the LGBTQ movement have contributed to mainstream culture.

 


 

SOC 31925: Sexuality, Gender, and Disability

[cross-listed with PSY 31925]

Term/Time: Summer Session 1 (4 Weeks) | Hybrid (in-person and asynchronous) | Monday and Tuesday 2:30PM - 5:25PM 

Instructor:  Siobhan Pokorney, LCSW

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course applies a critical lens to the study of sexuality, gender, and disability. We examine how social oppression is experienced by persons whose physical, cognitive, or psychological characteristics fall outside of socially constructed norms. In particular, we investigate the complex historical influences that impact how people discuss sexuality and disability. For example, people with disabilities have been considered asexual, hypersexual, or as victims, all of which deny their agency as sexual beings. We use disability, feminist, critical sexuality, and queer theories to explore and question various issues effecting the sexual lives and experiences of persons with disabilities and how these might help us understand gender and sexuality more generally. To understand the intersection of sexuality and disability, we engage with scholarly readings, news articles, popular media, social media, and TV shows/movies.

 

 


 

PSY 32200: Psychology of Sexuality & Gender

[cross-listed with PSY B9846]

Term/Time: Summer Session 1 (4 Weeks) | Online-Synchronous | Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday 8:30AM to 11:00AM

Instructor: Sebastian Cordoba

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate AND Graduate)

Description: This course will introduce theories, concepts and epistemologies regarding the psychologies of gender and sexual diversity. We will review and evaluate some of the most relevant research on gender diversity (its history, appeal, benefits and limitations) and sexual diversity (its history, criminalization, pathologization, de-pathologization and current insights).

 

 




 

SOC 31926: Sociology and Queer of Color Critique

[cross-listed with BLST 31926]

Term/Time: Summer Session 2 (4 Weeks) | Hybrid (in-person and asynchronous) | Tuesday and Thursday 2:30PM - 5:25PM

Instructor: Colin Ashley (he/him)

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: Why are mainstream LGBTQ+ studies and queer theories so white-centered, while theorizations of race and ethnicity pose heterosexuality as the norm? Using the interdisciplinary framework of Queer of Color Critique, we explore how to expand and challenge the heterosexual and white-centered assumptions of sociology of sexualities, gender, and race through the perspectives and experiences of LGBTQ+ people of color. To examine how such social constructions of sexualities and gender intersect with race, ethnicity, class, ability, and other social identity categories, we examine macro level issues of colonialism, imperialism, immigration and migration, mass incarceration and policing as they pertain to racial and sexual/gender minorities. We will also cover immediate and ongoing issues, such as transphobia, drag queen phobia, activism/social movements, media representation, homelessness, and book banning that impact the everyday experiences of LGBTQ+ people, especially queer youth.

NOTE: Zero Cost Textbooks

 


 

WS 10000: Women's Gender Roles in Contemporary Society

Term/Time: Summer Session 1 (4 Weeks) | Online-Asynchronous

Instructor: Jasmina Sinanović (they/them)

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: An introduction to issues that arise when women's lives and gender roles become the focus of critical inquiry. How do different societies and academic disciplines define women, men and those who do not fit in either category? How does gendered experiences vary in relation to factors such as race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, age and nationality? How have women resisted, adapted to, and transformed "women's space" in the United States and elsewhere?

NOTE: Zero Cost Textbooks

 


 

WS 32463: Queer of Color Critique Towards Utopia

Term/Time: Summer Session 2 (4 Weeks) | In-Person | Tuesday and Thursday 2:30PM - 5:25PM

Instructor: Carlos Encina Oleart (he/him)

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: In What’s Queer About Queer Studies, editors say that queerness can never be presumed in advance. Queerness is not a cohere term, rather they would say, it is always in flux, reinventing itself as a process and identity. In this course, we will examine this assertion and ask, who is queer? Why are they queer? When are they queer? Beginning with Cathy Cohen and Roderick Furgeson we will learn the connections between the process of racialization and queerness. We will then move to theorists such as Jasbir Puar who examines the relationship between the Racial State and queerness. Finally, we will interrogate the relationship queer studies, and queer of color critique has with antiblackness and settler colonialism. We will end this course drawing on Jose Munoz’s theories on utopia in order to discuss the future of queer theory and its usefulness in the project of abolition, and in reimagining the world as we know it.

Spring 2023

ARCH 51510: Topics in the History of Architecture and Society

Term/Time: Spring Term | Online-Synchronous | Wednesday 9:30AM - 10:45AM 

Instructor:  Cassim Shepard

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate AND Graduate)

Description: HOUSING JUSTICE: This advanced seminar frames housing justice as a distinct and interdisciplinary focus of study, introducing many of the key disciplines — including architecture and urban planning, anthropology and sociology, and political science and economics — that have advanced specific theoretical approaches to understanding housing in contexts of poverty around the world. We will excavate some key episodes over the past 150 years when these disciplines have informed attempts by practitioners — including designers, activists, journalists, philanthropists, and policymakers — to improve the design and delivery of housing for low-income populations. Using the lens of “housing justice” and “a right to housing,” the course explores and critiques contemporary discourse on “affordable housing” as a strategy for dealing with the global housing crisis. By looking at the core assumptions and approaches that various disciplines have applied to the complex conundrum of housing, the course will provoke students to ask questions and formulate a personal position about the role of research, government, finance, and design in addressing the global housing crisis.


 

ART B8711: Gender and Sexuality in Mughal Arts

Term/Time: Spring term | In-Person | Wednesdays 2:00PM - 4:50PM

Instructor: Molly Aitken

Credits: 3 Credits (Graduate)

Description: We look at the visual and performing arts in Mughal South Asia as a theoretic and methodological resource for LGBTQ studies. We focus especially on a hermeneutics grounded in guising, especially through forms of cross-dressing in ecstatic devotion and in urban cultures of pleasure dominated by courtesans. The class combines canonic readings in gender and queer studies with emerging scholarship on gender and sexuality in premodern South Asia. Our primary resource are the visual arts of early modern South Asia, which emphasized the embodied, affective and multisensorial. Here queerness and cultural hybridity collaborated. For those with an interest in postcolonial theory, the course ends with the devastation of Mughal arts in South Asia in large part because of its celebration of the erotic and the gender fluid. ​We are in the midst of a resurgence of interest in all that was lost. Be part of the journey!


 

BIO 46000: Animal Behavior 

[cross-listed with BIO A6000]

Term/Time: Spring term | In-Person | Monday, Wednesday 2:00PM - 3:15PM

Instructor: Osceola Whitney

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate and Graduate)

Description: The biological bases of behavior, with emphasis on such topics as the development, evolution, genetics and ecology of behavior; sensory physiology; social behavior and communication. This is a flipped, online course. Students will read one textbook chapter and watch one pre-recorded lecture prior to attending one of the synchronous, 30-minute discussion sections each day. Both exams in the course will be asynchronous and can be taken during any two-hour window of time within a specified 24-hour period. 

NOTE: Required textbook: Principles of Animal Behavior, 4th Edition, Author: Dugatkin, Lee Alan, Publisher: University of Chicago Press, Edition: 4, Year Published: 2019, Price: 46.11 USD, ISBN: 9780226448381


 

BLST 30245: Black, Gay, Arts and Idea

Term/Time: Spring term | In-Person | Tuesday, Thursday 9:30AM - 10:45PM

Instructor: Abdul-Qadir Islam

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: Exploration of the intersections of Blackness and LGBTQ+ identity through various art forms.

NOTE: ZERO-COST TEXBOOKS


 

ANTH 20100: Cross-Cultural Perspectives 

Term: Spring Term | In-Person and Online Options | See Times Below

Instructor/Time/Location: 

1. James Tolleson | Tuesday, Thursday 9:30AM - 10:45AM | TBA

2. James Tolleson | Tuesday, Thursday 11:00AM - 12:15PM | NAC 5/101

3. Bruce Burnside | Monday, Wednesday 9:30AM - 10:45AM | TBA

4. Bruce Burnside | Friday 11:00AM-1:30PM | Online-Synchronous

5. Joan Lopez | Monday 5:00PM - 6:15PM | Online-Asynchronous


6. Omnia Ibrahim | Monday, Wednesday 12:30PM-1:45PM | In-Person
 

7. Instructor TBA | Tuesday, Thursday 8:00AM-9:15AM | Online-Asynchronous

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This class provides a general overview of the field of socio-cultural anthropology. As this class is an excursion into the field of socio-cultural anthropology, our main goal will be to understand, complicate, and theorize “culture.” Students are expected to leave with a fuller understanding of socio-cultural anthropology, ethnographic method, and the complexities of cultural life. The main questions in this class will be: What is culture? How do cultural practices vary across social contexts? How can culture be multiple and contradictory? What does an ethnographic method look like to study culture? Students will leave this class with a greater grasp of the “culture” concept and ethnographic methodologies.

 


 

ANTH 20200: Language in Cross-Cultural Perspective

Term/Time: Spring Term | Online-Synchronous | Wednesday 9:30AM - 10:45AM 

Instructor:  Lara Alonso Pinero

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course introduces students to the study of language from an anthropological perspective. Topics include the structure of language and its relationship to other kinds of communication; language use in face-to-face interactions; the relationship of language to class, race, ethnicity, gender, and other forms of social difference; and the role of language in mass-media

 


 

ANTH 20300: Human Origins

Term/Time: Spring Term | In-Person | Tuesday, Thursday 11:00AM - 12:15PM 

Instructor:  Matthew Reilly

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: An introduction to biological anthropology, this course will explore the biological and cultural elements of what makes us human. The fossil record of our hominid ancestors and the behavior of our primate relatives will lead to considerations of human variation and issues of social consequence like race, genetics, and inequality.

 


 

ANTH 23600: Anthropology of Gender & Sexuality

[cross-listed with WS 24659]

Term/Time: Spring Term | Online-Synchronous | Monday, Wednesday 2:00PM - 3:15PM 

Instructor:  Katherine Stefatos

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course explores how gender and sexuality are iterated, performed, challenged, and managed. Instead of seeing gender and sexuality as coherent and easily quantifiable categories, this class delves into the many contradictions in the categories of gender and sexuality in order to unpack everyday taken for granted assumptions. Furthermore, students will examine how these categories intersect, how they inform each other, and how they gain traction with race, class, and ethnicity.

NOTE: All readings and materials will be ZERO cost


 

ANTH 31123: Anthropology of Popular Culture

Term/Time: Spring Term | In-Person | Monday, Wednesday 2:00PM - 3:15PM 

Instructor:  Eliza Marks

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: Anthropology of Popular Culture delves into the various realms of popular culture. These forms of popular culture range from cinema to TV to sport. Through an anthropological investigation of popular culture, the class will explore how identities and worldviews are negotiated,challenged, and managed through consumption. In the process, the class will analyze the many practices of appropriation, consumption, reception, and cultural production. In this class, you will engage with larger debates about popular culture while testing out whether we are victims to mass production or whether we appropriate in many contradictory ways. This class will involve critical analysis of ethnographies on popular culture in order to understand the workings of race, gender, sexuality, and class.

 


 

ANTH 31968: Language and Gender

Term/Time: Spring Term | Online-Synchronous and Asynchronous | Tuesday 3:30PM - 4:45PM 

Instructor:  Andrea Ariza Garcia

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course explores how language, gender, sexuality, power and identity are interwoven. Drawing on linguistic anthropology, critical sociolinguistics, feminist and queer theories, and ethnographic case studies, we’ll focus on topics such as gender identity, performativity and language use, ideologies of gender and language, sexual orientation, and processes of nationalism and globalization that are interwoven with gender and sexuality. The course will take an intersectional approach to all these topics, with a particular focus on intersectionality and Black feminism in week 11. The aim of this course is to think, reflect, and learn about ourselves as socio-historical and cultural beings permeated by linguistic interactions that reinforce and/or resist gender normativity.

 


 

ANTH 31968: Language and Gender

Term/Time: Spring Term | Online-Synchronous | Tuesday, Thursday 11:00AM - 12:15PM 

Instructor:  Griselda Rodriguez

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: An examination of the idea of race from biological, sociocultural, and historical standpoints, particularly as it arose in support of the development of western European colonialism and imperialism. Also investigated will be the role of race/racism via-a-vis socioeconomic inequality, gender, class, ethnicity, and sexuality.

 


 

ANTH 32600: Anthropology of Disability: From Memoir to Ethnography

Term/Time: Spring Term | Online-Synchronous and In-Person | Tuesday, Thursday 2:00PM - 3:15PM 

Instructor:  Bernardo Spaulonci Chiachia

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course is one of the Department’s 300-level offerings and can fulfill the major requirement for one 300 level elective. It speaks to the Department’s commitment to addressing pressing issues and pursuing a public anthropology in its curriculum and also further develops the curriculum in medical anthropology because of the attention to trauma. It expands the Department’s cross-cultural offerings and addresses critical contemporary issues from an ethnographic and theoretical perspective that can have policy implications. It may be of particular interest to students looking toward careers in international contexts in fields such as development, humanitarianism, human rights or who wish to pursue professional work in the U.S. with populations fleeing from war and other contexts of violence.

 


 

EDCE 5700C: Multi-Cultural Education

Term/Time: Spring Term | In-Person | Monday 4:50PM-7:20PM

Instructor: Jesús Fraga

 

Credits: 3 Credits (Graduate) 

 

Description: Education that is Multicultural, EDCE 5700C, analyzes the various components of a desirable education in a pluralistic society, provides opportunities for developing curriculum and strategies which reflect respect and dignity for all people, examines students’ needs within a humanistic framework, and critically examines instructional materials for bias and enrichment. New York City is one of the most diverse cities in the world, and its teachers and students bring a spectrum of cultural, racial, linguistic, sexual orientations, and ethnic backgrounds to their classrooms. Schools play a large role in rejecting or affirming this diversity through an education that falls along the continuum of mono-cultural to multicultural. This course address five umbrella topics in Multicultural Education: 1. Immigration/Migration/ Refugees, 2. Race and Ethnicity, 3. Languages and Dialects, 4. Sexual Orientation/LGBTQ+, and 5. Religion. Furthermore, the course will assist students to reconsider personal assumptions and beliefs about diversity, and analyze how schools and society have set-up inequitable opportunities for some groups while maintaining the privilege of others. The course considers teaching as a political activity and explores ways for educators to “teach against the grain” through culturally and locally relevant pedagogy. 

NOTE: Required textbook: Affirming Diversity: The Sociopolitical Context of Multicultural Education, Author: Nieto, Sonia; Bode, Patty, Publisher: Pearson, Edition: 7, Year Published: 2017, Price: 27.45 USD, ISBN: 9780134047232

 


 

 

HIST 31685: LGTBQ World History 

[cross-listed with ANTH 31685 & WS 31685] 

Term/Time: Spring Term | In-Person | Monday, Wednesday 12:30PM - 1:45PM

Instructor: Dr. Yaari Felber-Seligman

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course focuses on the history, contributions, and experiences of gender and sexually-diverse individuals throughout world history, with particular emphasis on nonwestern cultures. It broadly explores changes and debates within the field of history as a whole and the stakes of centering historical analysis on individuals often overlooked or erased by mainstream history writing. The course will balance big-picture discussions with case studies drawn from the instructor’s geographic expertise. These will include examples of precolonial LGBTQ history, how nonwestern cultures conceptualized gender and sexual diversity, the fraught imperial and colonial periods, and contemporary historians’ efforts to diversify curriculums and public knowledge. Students will research a related topic of their choice and develop a final project that can take the form of a research proposal, a teaching unit, or a presentation for the public (such as a film proposal, informative website, podcast series, etc). 

NOTE: All readings and materials will be ZERO cost

 


 

LALS 31118: Racialization: Single Mothers, Sexual and Religious Minorities 

[cross-listed with SOC 31145] 

Term/Time: Spring Term | Online-Synchronous | Thursday 9:30AM - 10:45AM

Instructor: Norma Fuentes-Mayorga

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course offers an introduction to the study of minority and majority group relations in the United States with a comparative focus drawing from examples in Latin America and Europe. We examine the historical factors that have led to the creation of a white majority and a black minority in America and other national contexts; how a minority or majority status is created and internalized by individuals and their youth. We pay close attention to how increasing economic and wealth inequality, globalization and immigration affects the formation of new, minority groups and statuses drawing on the example of growing share of working poor or 'missing class' individuals in America; the life chances of the undocumented, and those of single migrant mothers, religious minorities such as Muslim youth and the networks of sexual minorities that help them integrate in society and cope with glaring discrimination and exclusion. Students will be able to engage in informed debates about how increases in family, ethnic, racial and sexual diversity in the US and other nations will help close the historical divides between white and black groups in America. They will also master new knowledge on how race and racialization processes take place in Latin America or in nations such as Brazil and the Dominican Republic where efforts have been made to alleviate racial inequality and tensions, but where blacks and mulattoes have historically make up the majority of the poor and whites and light-skin people still make up the ruling elite.

NOTE: All readings and materials will be ZERO cost

 


 

LALS 31136: Migration, Gender and Health in Latinx Communities

[cross-listed with SOC 31153] 

Term/Time: Spring Term | Online | Synchronous | Monday, Wednesday 11:00AM - 12:15PM

Instructor: Iris Lopez

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: Through an interdisciplinary feminist approach, this course explores how women, men, and youth experience health problems related to migration and social inequality. We will place health risks within a transnational context, examining the socio-economic, political, and cultural influences on particular social problems and health outcomes and critique the political discourse on health and how they construct racialized, sexualized others. We examine health promotion and other programs that aim to design culturally sensitive interventions about health problems by migrants and how communities and individuals work toward alleviating their own health risks. Some familiarity with Spanish is helpful.

 


 

PSY 35700: Community Psychology 

Term/Time: Spring Term | In-Person | Synchronous | Tuesday, Thursday 11:00AM - 12:15PM 

Instructor: Richard Clark

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This is an OER-based Zero-cost course designed to introduce students to the field of community psychology. Community psychology is primarily concerned with individuals in their social context. Community psychology seeks to support and understand communities and conduct research that helps these communities thrive. Sometimes community psychology engages more broadly doing work focused on the large connected and diverse communities such as the Black community and sometimes it more focused such as a community of students at a single university. As a critical community psychologist myself my focus has always been on social justice, change, and activism. As such this course will engage with critical theories, concepts, and methods within the field of community psychology. In doing so it is my hope that students will gain a deeper understanding of community psychology. The course will move away from and challenge the traditional community deficit models and instead emphasize community psychology that focuses on community issues, engagement, empowerment, activism, and work. 

NOTE: All readings and materials will be ZERO cost

 


 

PSY 31158: Queer Psychology

Term/Time: Spring Term | In-Person | Monday, Wednesday 11:00AM-12:15PM 

Instructor:  Christopher Hoffman

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: What is queerness and what does it have to do with psychology? In this course, we will attempt to “queer” psychology by applying a critical lens to psychology’s study of sexuality and gender. Together, we will examine issues of queerness, identity, physical and social environments within the field of psychology


 

SPAN 45300: Gender Issues in Spanish Letters

Term/Time: Spring Term | In-Person | Monday, Wednesday 3:30PM-4:45PM

Instructor:  Araceli Tinajero

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: An exploration of the impact of gender in the literature of the Spanish-speaking world. 50% of the course will be devoted to films, plays, and art.

NOTE: ZERO textbook cost. Class taught in Spanish but students may participate in English. Please contact Professor Tinajero for registration ( atinajero@ccny.cuny.edu ).


 

THTR 21700: Queer Theatre

Term/Time: Spring Term | In-Person | Tuesday, Thursday 3:30PM-4:45PM

Instructor:  Brandon Judell

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: An exploration of LGBTQ identity as portrayed in predominantly American dramas of the past century. Students will learn about key figures and texts, starting with Oscar Wilde, followed by consideration of stereotypical and groundbreaking portrayals of queer people, as well as analyzing plays with themes of homophobia, self-hatred, acceptance, AIDS, familial interaction, and the evolution of the LGBTQ rights movement in a hetero-normative society.

NOTE: ZERO textbook cost.

 


 

WS 10000: Women's Gender Roles in Contemporary Society

Term: Spring Term | TBA | See Times Below

Instructor/Time/Location: 

1. Arielle Cribb | Monday, Wednesday 11:00AM - 12:15PM | TBA

2. Instructor TBA | TBA | TBA

3. Jasmina Sinanovic | Tuesday, Thursday 11:00AM - 12:15PM | TBA

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: An introduction to issues that arise when women's lives and gender roles become the focus of critical inquiry. How do different societies and academic disciplines define women? How do women's experiences vary in relation to factors such as race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, age and nationality? How have women resisted, adapted to, and transformed "women's space" in the United States and elsewhere?

 


 

WS 24659: Anthropology of Gender & Sexuality

[cross-listed with ANTH 23600]

Term/Time: Spring Term | Online-Synchronous | Monday, Wednesday 2:00PM - 3:15PM 

Instructor:  Katherine Stefatos

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course explores how gender and sexuality are iterated, performed, challenged, and managed. Instead of seeing gender and sexuality as coherent and easily quantifiable categories, this class delves into the many contradictions in the categories of gender and sexuality in order to unpack everyday taken for granted assumptions. Furthermore, students will examine how these categories intersect, how they inform each other, and how they gain traction with race, class, and ethnicity.

NOTE: No textbooks, no pre-requisites


 

WS 25441: Gender and Sexuality in New York Politics

Term/Time: Spring Term | In-Person | Tuesday, Thursday 2:00PM - 3:15PM 

Instructor:  Bianca Guerrero

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: While New York City failed to elect its first female Mayor in 2021, it did elect a majority-women City Council. Governor Cuomo resigned in disgrace, elevating his Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul to the state’s highest post. What difference, if any, has this representation made? The state repealed a “walking while trans” ban that advocates argued led to discrimination against the LGBTQ community. How did they win that battle?

This class will look at these questions and more to understand the roles of women, genderqueer, and LGBTQ+ New Yorkers in our political landscape. We will evaluate how housing, workers’ rights, public safety, and other issues affect these communities, and what advocates are currently fighting to change

 


 

WS 31012: LGBTQ History, Culture and Movements

Term/Time: Spring Term | Online | Monday, Wednesday 11:00AM - 12:15PM 

Instructor:  Jasmina Sinanović 

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course traces the history of LGBTQ people as well as struggles for recognition and acceptance both in the US and globally. With attention to how sexual identity intersects with race, class and gender, the course will examine how LGBTQ people can be placed within historical and political contexts. We will question how and why homosexuality became criminalized and the movements that led to decriminalization. We will spend a significant portion of time on the USA and Western Europe in the 19th and 20th century and the development of a contemporary LGBTQ movement. We will also look at how people of various gender identities and sexualities lived before and outside of European colonial context and explore how European colonization influenced changes in perception of people with gender variant identities as well as people outside of heteronormative sexual practices in their local communities.

NOTE: ZERO textbook cost

 


 

WS 31122: Blancas, Negras & Morenas: Gender and Race in Another America

[cross-listed with ANTH 23600]

Term/Time: Spring Term | In-Person | Monday, Wednesday 11:00AM - 12:15PM 

Instructor:  Iris Lopez

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: Description unavailable.

NOTE: ZERO textbook cost

 


 

WS 31123: Latinas’ Reproductive Rights

Term/Time: Spring Term | Online-Synchronous and Asynchronous | Tuesday, Thursday 9:30AM - 10:45AM 

Instructor: Iris Lopez

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: Description unavailable.

 


 

WS 31167: Coming of Age in the African Diaspora

Term/Time: Spring Term | Online-Synchronous | Monday, Wednesday 12:30PM - 1:45PM 

Instructor: Arielle Cribb

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course will be an examination of feminist/womanist/political awakenings in young women throughout the African Diaspora. This examination will be through literature by Black women from various regions and time periods. The course will be centered in the philosophy of the “personal is political” and how the awakening to this fact affects the trajectory of the young women’s lives in these works.

 


 

WS 32459: Criminalization and Mass Incarceration

[cross-listed with ANTH 32459]

Term/Time: Spring Term | Online-Asynchronous | 

Instructor: Sharon White-Harrigan

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: An in depth look at the systemic racism and classism that has fueled the pipeline of incarceration, the policies and practices of the carceral state and the continuous impact it has on the people.

 


 

WS 32463: Queer of Color Critique Towards Utopia

Term/Time: Spring Term | Online-Synchronous | Tuesday, Thursday 6:30PM-7:45PM

Instructor:  TBA

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: In What’s Queer About Queer Studies, editors say that queerness can never be presumed in advance. Queerness is not a cohere term, rather they would say, it is always in flux, reinventing itself as a process and identity. In this course, we will examine this assertion and ask, who is queer? Why are they queer? When are they queer? Beginning with Cathy Cohen and Roderick Furgeson we will learn the connections between the process of racialization and queerness. We will then move to theorists such as Jasbir Puar who examines the relationship between the Racial State and queerness. Finally, we will interrogate the relationship queer studies, and queer of color critique has with antiblackness and settler colonialism. We will end this course drawing on Jose Munoz’s theories on utopia in order to discuss the future of queer theory and its usefulness in the project of abolition, and in reimagining the world as we know it.

 


 

WS 32463: Queer of Color Critique Towards Utopia

Term/Time: Spring Term | In-Person | Wednesday 5:00PM-8:00PM

Instructor:  Professor Roulette

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: Description unavailable.

Winter Session 2023

 

ANTH 20100: Cross-Cultural Perspectives 

 

Term/Time: Spring Term | Online-Asynchronous

Instructor/Time/Location: Joan Lopez

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This class provides a general overview of the field of socio-cultural anthropology. As this class is an excursion into the field of socio-cultural anthropology, our main goal will be to understand, complicate, and theorize “culture.” Students are expected to leave with a fuller understanding of socio-cultural anthropology, ethnographic method, and the complexities of cultural life. The main questions in this class will be: What is culture? How do cultural practices vary across social contexts? How can culture be multiple and contradictory? What does an ethnographic method look like to study culture? Students will leave this class with a greater grasp of the “culture” concept and ethnographic methodologies.

 


 

ANTH 20200: Language in Cross-Cultural Perspective

Term/Time: Winter Term | Online-Synchronous | Tuesday, Thursday 9:00AM - 11:45AM 

Instructor:  Andrea Ariza Garcia

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course introduces students to the study of language from an anthropological perspective. Topics include the structure of language and its relationship to other kinds of communication; language use in face-to-face interactions; the relationship of language to class, race, ethnicity, gender, and other forms of social difference; and the role of language in mass-media

 


 

 ANTH 20300: Human Origins

Term/Time: Winter Term | Online-Asynchronous 

Instructor:  Julie Lozano

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: An introduction to biological anthropology, this course will explore the biological and cultural elements of what makes us human. The fossil record of our hominid ancestors and the behavior of our primate relatives will lead to considerations of human variation and issues of social consequence like race, genetics, and inequality.

 


 

ANTH 31965: Museums & Anthropology

Term/Time: Spring Term | Online-Synchronous and Asynchronous | Wednesday, Friday 9:00AM - 11:45PM 

Instructor:  Bruce Burnside

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: What does it mean to preserve, display, and remember culture? Though museums were foundational institutions for anthropologists to display and interpret culture, in recent decades critical questions of ownership, voice, and decolonization have become forefront for museum studies. Through a series of readings, films and discussions this course will critically engage with anthropological concepts and entanglements with museums in our historical and contemporary world. We will explore issues of diversity and inclusion, colonialism and ownership, and voice and representation. We will critically assess major museum institutions, community museums, experimental museums as well as monuments and ask what it means to represent, negotiate and contest human material and visual culture.

 


 

ANTH 31978: Forced Migration

Term/Time: Spring Term | Online-Asynchronous | 

Instructor:  Katherine Stefatos

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: The Anthropology of Forced Migration provides a critical overview of contemporary theoretical approaches to forced displacement, migration, and dispossession. The readings focus on ethnographies of exclusion and belonging and lived experiences of forced migration and exile.

NOTE: ZERO textbook cost

 


 

WS 10000: Women's Gender Roles in Contemporary Society

Term: Winter Term | Online-Asynchronous 

Instructor/Time/Location: 

1. Asale Angel-Ajani | Online | TBA

2. Asale Angel-Ajani | Online | TBA

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: An introduction to issues that arise when women's lives and gender roles become the focus of critical inquiry. How do different societies and academic disciplines define women? How do women's experiences vary in relation to factors such as race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, age and nationality? How have women resisted, adapted to, and transformed "women's space" in the United States and elsewhere?

 


 

WS 31467: Post Trauma Recovery (PTR): Healing Our Communities

[cross-listed with ANTH 31467]

Term: Winter Term | Online-Asynchronous

Instructor/Time/Location: Sharon White-Harrigan

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: A in-depth look at the causes and effects of trauma through Incarceration/Reentry, Domestic/Intimate partner violence, Police Brutality, Grief, Substance Abuse and how to begin the process of healing.

Fall 2022

ANTH 20104: Cross-Cultural Perspectives 

Term: Fall Term | In-Person | Wednesdays 6:30PM - 9:00PM 

Instructor/Time/Location: 

1. James Tolleson | Tuesday, Thursday 11:00AM - 12:15PM | Room TBA

2. James Tolleson | Tuesday, Thursday 9:30AM - 10:45AM | Room TBA

3. Ola Galal | Friday 11:00AM - 1:30PM | Room TBA

4. Ola Galal | Thursday 2:00PM - 3:15PM | Room TBA

5. Jennifer Lutton (she/her) ( jlutton@ccny.cuny.edu ) | Monday, Wednesday 5:00PM - 6:15PM | Room TBA

6. Susanna Rosenbaum (she/her) ( srosenbaum@ccny.cuny.edu ) | Tuesday 6:00PM - 9:20PM | Room TBA

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This class provides a general overview of the field of socio-cultural anthropology. As this class is an excursion into the field of socio-cultural anthropology, our main goal will be to understand, complicate, and theorize “culture.” Students are expected to leave with a fuller understanding of socio-cultural anthropology, ethnographic method, and the complexities of cultural life. The main questions in this class will be: What is culture? How do cultural practices vary across social contexts? How can culture be multiple and contradictory? What does an ethnographic method look like to study culture? Students will leave this class with a greater grasp of the “culture” concept and ethnographic methodologies.

 


 

ANTH 20200: Language in Cross-Cultural Perspective

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Tuesday, Thursday 9:30AM - 10:45AM 

Instructor:  Andy Tan ( ztan@gradcenter.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course introduces students to the study of language from an anthropological perspective. Topics include the structure of language and its relationship to other kinds of communication; language use in face-to-face interactions; the relationship of language to class, race, ethnicity, gender, and other forms of social difference; and the role of language in mass-media

 


 

ANTH 31256: Masculinity and Latinidad: Redefining Masculinities in the U.S.

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Tuesday 5:00PM - 6:15PM 

Instructor:  Mariana Romo-Carmona (she/her) ( mromocarmona@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: The concept of hegemonic masculinity has been used to explain societal behaviors in terms of men's power over women. In this course, we will analyze the connection to the marginalization of Latinx communities in mainstream U.S. culture, and the way stereotypical cultural attitudes are too easily attributed to machismo and stagnant characterizations of Latinx men, i.e., behaviors that conform to racist expectations of men of color. We will also explore how Latinx men break with tradition in the arts, literature, and popular culture

 


 

ANTH 32400: Violation of Human Rights

Term/Time: Fall Term | Online - Synchronous | Tuesday, Thursday 11:00AM - 12:15PM 

Instructor:  Margarita-Asha Samad-Matias ( asamadmatias@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: A review of the development of human rights accords and legislation, followed by an examination of international institutions overseeing and enforcing human rights standards. Special attention will be given to media and institutional responses to human rights issues, such as those tied to international, regional, and class injustices, with an emphasis on situations involving women and social minorities/oppressed groups

 


 

ART B8711: Gender and Sexuality in Mughal Arts

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Thursday 2:00PM - 4:50PM 

Instructor:  Molly Emma Aitken (she/her) ( maitken@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Graduate)

Description: Early critical theory in art history addressed questions of gender and sexuality to the European tradition, and that shaped how the discipline, even today, conceptualizes the male gaze and the formative role of images in the formation of sexual subjectivities. This class turns to the visual arts of South Asia during the Mughal period (1556-1858) to consider a different regime of gender, sexuality and the image. What does it mean to theorize gender and sexuality outside European traditions? We revisit canonic readings on these topics, as well as examples of critical thinking about gender and sexuality from other areas of art history. We consider how historians of Mughal art have begun to find a way forward to deal with Mughal works of art that put sexuality front and center of political and social discourse, and together we consider possible avenues for the future

 


 

BLST 31179: Black Queer Subjectivities

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Thursday, Thursday 2:00PM - 3:15PM 

Instructor:  Abdul-Qadir Islam (he/him)

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: Black Queer Subjectivities will examine LGBTQ communities throughout the African Diaspora mostly through the lens of historical work. The course will span the 14th century to the present across the African Diaspora. Students will engage in robust discussion about both historical works as well as literary and film products connected the LGBTQ communities across the African Diaspora

 


 

EDCE 5700C: Multi-Cultural Education

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Synchronous | Wednesdays 4:50PM-7:20PM 

Instructor: Jesús Fraga (he/him) ( jfraga@ccny.cuny.edu

Credits: 3 Credits (Graduate) 

Description: Education that is Multicultural, EDCE 5700C, analyzes the various components of a desirable education in a pluralistic society, provides opportunities for developing curriculum and strategies which reflect respect and dignity for all people, examines students’ needs within a humanistic framework, and critically examines instructional materials for bias and enrichment. New York City is one of the most diverse cities in the world, and its teachers and students bring a spectrum of cultural, racial, linguistic, sexual orientations, and ethnic backgrounds to their classrooms. Schools play a large role in rejecting or affirming this diversity through an education that falls along the continuum of mono-cultural to multicultural. This course address five umbrella topics in Multicultural Education: 1. Immigration/Migration/ Refugees, 2. Race and Ethnicity, 3. Languages and Dialects, 4. Sexual Orientation/LGBTQ+, and 5. Religion. Furthermore, the course will assist students to reconsider personal assumptions and beliefs about diversity, and analyze how schools and society have set-up inequitable opportunities for some groups while maintaining the privilege of others. The course considers teaching as a political activity and explores ways for educators to “teach against the grain” through culturally and locally relevant pedagogy. 

NOTE: Required textbook: Affirming Diversity: The Sociopolitical Context of Multicultural Education, Author: Nieto, Sonia; Bode, Patty, Publisher: Pearson, Edition: 7, Year Published: 2017, Price: 27.45 USD, ISBN: 9780134047232

 


 

HIST B0704: History of South Africa

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Synchronous | Tuesdays 4:50PM-6:50PM

Instructor: Yaari Felber-Seligman (they/them) ( yfelberseligman@ccny.cuny.edu

Credits: 3 Credits (Graduate) 

Description: Includes some LGBTQ+ content. Home to some of the earliest humans, the long history of South Africa represents themes that mirror broader African history and also key struggles that shaped the United States. The course explores the complex history of southern Africa as a region and the country of South Africa specifically. Through a series of case studies, it highlights important cultural, social, economic, and political themes along with past scholars' approaches to them. The course also delves into the complexities of recent identity politics, historical memory, and public history projects in South Africa, all impacted by the country's earlier history.

 


 

HIST 27600/BLST 31201: Africa and the Modern World

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Synchronous | Tuesdays, Thursdays 2:00PM-3:15PM 

Instructor: Yaari Felber-Seligman (they/them) ( yfelberseligman@ccny.cuny.edu

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate) 

Description: Includes some LGBTQ+ content. This course explores the dynamics of history, economy, society, and politics in Africa from 1500 to present. Topics include Africa-world interactions, the growth of African states, economies, and cities, and changing forms of popular culture, gender, and livelihoods. The course will move between discussions of Africa-wide developments and local events. Rather than sharply divide African history into precolonial, and postcolonial segments, it will explore changes and continuities. Moving between discussions of Africa-wide developments and case studies of remarkable individuals and specific African societies, the course examines how the history of five key centuries continues to define Africa today.

 


 

LALS 31118: Racialization: Single Mothers, Sexual and Religious Minorities

[cross-listed with SOC 31145]

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Monday, Wednesday 11:00AM - 12:15PM 

Instructor:  Norma Fuentes-Mayorga (she/her) ( nfuentes@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course offers an introduction to the study of minority and majority group relations in the United States with a comparative focus drawing from examples in Latin America and Europe. We examine the historical factors that have led to the creation of a white majority and a black minority in America and other national contexts; how a minority or majority status is created and internalized by individuals and their youth. We pay close attention to how increasing economic and wealth inequality, globalization and immigration affects the formation of new, minority groups and statuses drawing on the example of growing share of working poor or 'missing class' individuals in America; the life chances of the undocumented, and those of single migrant mothers, religious minorities such as Muslim youth and the networks of sexual minorities that help them integrate in society and cope with glaring discrimination and exclusion. Students will be able to engage in informed debates about how increases in family, ethnic, racial and sexual diversity in the US and other nations will help close the historical divides between white and black groups in America. They will also master new knowledge on how race and racialization processes take place in Latin America or in nations such as Brazil and the Dominican Republic where efforts have been made to alleviate racial inequality and tensions, but where blacks and mulattoes have historically make up the majority of the poor and whites and light-skin people still make up the ruling elite.

 


 

MCA 34100: Radio Journalism

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Thursdays 6:30PM - 9:00PM 

Instructor:  Camille Petersen (she/her) ( camillefvpetersen@gmail.com )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This is a basic course in radio reporting and production. Students learn to write for the ear and incorporate the creative uses of sound in telling a news story. Production techniques are an integral part of the course Students receive actual on-air experience in the news department of WHCR, the college's community radio station. No prerequisites required. Note from Professor Petersen: "The class is an excellent space for students to tell stories about LGBTQ+ lives and issues. It's also a space for telling their own stories. In the class, they'll learn how to report, write, and edit audio stories and get hands-on experience with podcasting."

 


 

PSY 31158: Queer Psychology

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Friday 12:30PM - 3:00PM 

Instructor:  Christopher Hoffman (he/him) ( choffman@gradcenter.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: What is queerness and what does it have to do with psychology? In this course, we will attempt to “queer” psychology by applying a critical lens to psychology’s study of sexuality and gender. Together, we will examine issues of queerness, identity, physical and social environments within the field of psychology

 


 

PSY 31914: LGBTQ+ Counseling

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Tuesday, Thursday 6:30PM - 7:45PM 

Instructor:  Hailey Wojcik

Credits: 3-9 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course aims to empower clinicians to conduct culturally-competent, evidence-based clinical mental health care with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, non-binary, queer, intersex, and often unnamed gender-expansive communities. We will discuss historical and contemporary issues, as well as best practices and guidelines for mental health counselors working within youth, college/university, and hospital/healthcare settings. Students will also engage in self-reflection to examine the ways in which their own identities and experiences may influence therapist-client dynamics.

 


 

PSY 8343J: Sex and Gender

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Tuesday 9:45AM - 11:45AM 

Instructor:  Margaret Rosario (she/her) ( mrosario@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Graduate)

Description: This course aims to address the determinants, development, and implications for mental and physical health and for positive adaptation of sex and gender identities. By the end of the course, the student should appreciate and understand the biopsychosocial factors underlying sex and gender, as well as the relations of those factors to health

 


 

PSY V5650: Gender and Psychopathology

Term/Time: Fall Term | Online-Synchronous | Monday 6:30PM - 9:00PM 

Instructor:  Brett Silverstein (he/him) ( bsilverstein@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Graduate)

Description: The course will focus on theories and findings related to why specific psychological disorders tend to be much more prevalent among women and others tend to be much more prevalent among men. Readings will include theoretical work on gender, studies of the methodology used in relating gender and psychopathology, and research on the connection between gender and particular disorders, including perhaps depression, some anxiety disorders, disordered eating, autism, and conduct disorder.

 


 

SCI 31105: Identity and Representation in Games

Term/Time: Fall Term | Hybrid | Monday, Wednesday 3:30PM - 4:45PM 

Instructor:  Nick Fortungo (he/him)

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This discussion-based class explores how games have dealt with questions of identity. By looking at specific games and writings about games that ask questions about the role of race, gender, sexuality, and class, the course critically examines how games have dealt (or not dealt) with these issues. A variety of speakers representing different parts of the industry present their own experiences and work on these topics. Assignments ask student to apply the ideas they've explore in class readings, play, and conversations to the games and game culture they consume.

 


 

SOC 31910: Science of Sex and Gender

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Tuesday, Thursday 11:00AM - 12:15PM 

Instructors:  Christine Li (she/her) ( cli@ccny.cuny.edu ), Maritsa Poros (she/her) ( mporos@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course will explore the biological basis of sex and sociological understandings of gender, including where the two intersect. The interaction between genes on the Y chromosome with genes on other chromosomes to determine biological sex will be explored. The course will also explore the social construction of gender and how gendered identities shape everyday life, including at the intersection of sex and gender

 


 

SOC 38210: Sociology of Gender

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Monday, Wednesday 9:30AM - 10:45AM 

Instructor:  Benjamin Porter

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: TBA (See CUNYfirst for updates)

 


 

THTR 31115: LGBT Film and Theatre

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Tuesday, Thursday 2:00PM - 3:15PM 

Instructor:  Brandon Judell (he/him) ( bjudell@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: A celebratory exploration of queer identity as portrayed in international theatre and films in the post-Stonewall era, from 1969 on.  We will explore presentations of both stereotypical and emancipated portrayals of gay people dealing with homophobia, self-hatred, acceptance, AIDS, familial interaction, and the evolution of the GLBT rights movement in a heteronormative society.

 


 

WS 10000: Women's Gender Roles in Contemporary Society

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Monday, Wednesday 12:30PM - 1:45PM 

Instructor:  Jasmina Sinanovic (they/them) ( jsinanovic@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: An introduction to issues that arise when women's lives and gender roles become the focus of critical inquiry. How do different societies and academic disciplines define women? How do women's experiences vary in relation to factors such as race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, age and nationality? How have women resisted, adapted to, and transformed "women's space" in the United States and elsewhere?

 


 

WS 24659: Anthropology of Gender & Sexuality

Term/Time: Fall Term | Online-Synchronous | Monday, Wednesday 12:00PM - 1:45PM 

Instructor:  Katherine Stefatos (she/her)

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course explores how gender and sexuality are iterated, performed, challenged, and managed. Instead of seeing gender and sexuality as coherent and easily quantifiable categories, this class delves into the many contradictions in the categories of gender and sexuality in order to unpack everyday taken for granted assumptions. Furthermore, students will examine how these categories intersect, how they inform each other, and how they gain traction with race, class, and ethnicity.

 


 

WS 31715: Black Art in the Age of AIDS

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Thursday 5:00PM - 7:50PM 

Instructor:  Tod Roulette

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course will examine African American history, literature, art, theater, performance, film and fashion. This interdisciplinary approach will examine, in particular, black gay men and the distinct creative and political identity they have created about race and sexuality. After the discovery of AIDS in 1981, gay men faced a great deal of prejudice, discrimination and isolation. One way they countered the exclusion, silence and hate, was through artistic mediums. Their creative responses to the dual prejudices of racism and homophobia will be discussed and analyzed with visits from men who created during the 80’s and 90’s and by viewing performances

 


 

(Hunter College) ASIAN 390.19/WGS 300.38: Asian American Queerness

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Tuesdays and Fridays 4:00PM - 5:15PM 

Instructor:  Glenn Magpantay ( gmagpant@hunter.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course will explore the issues, struggles, political organizing, and theory of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) Asian Americans, South Asians, Southeast Asians, and Pacific Islanders.  Through readings of historical and modern texts, law and public policy, film and video, guest speakers, and field work, students will come to understand the intersection between LGBT identity and racial/ ethnic identity.

 


 

(John Jay) POL 318: The Law and Politics of LGBTQ Rights

#1 Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Thursday 10:50AM - 12:05PM 

#2 Term/Time: Fall Term | Online-Asynchronous 

#1 Instructor: Katie Zuber

#2 Instructor: Natalie Johnson

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: The course explores legal and political issues affecting lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) people in the United States. It focuses in particular on contests over the criminalization of same-sex activity; the enactment of legal protections for LGBTQ people and their families; the marriage equality movement; and contemporary debates over the scope of federal non-discrimination protections, transgender rights, and exemptions for those who object to LGBTQ equality on religious grounds. The course aims to give students a deeper appreciation of the constraints, opportunities, and strategic choices that have shaped the development of LGBTQ rights in law and policy, both historically and in the present day.

Summer 2022

LALS 31313: Caribbean Sexualities: Power and Privilege

Term/Time: Summer Term | Four Week - First (6/6 - 7/5) | Online | Asynchronous

Instructor: Daniel Nieves (he/him) ( dnieves@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course examines Caribbean sexualities—identity, desire, interaction, and structure—with a particular emphasis on the Spanish Caribbean, allowing students to explore themes useful for them in developing a broad comparative perspective on the region. The course takes as a fundamental premise that since the first moments of “contact” with Europeans, the insertion of the Caribbean into the global economy has been crucially marked by relations of inequality. This inequality is negotiated through the representation and commoditization of bodies and desires. The readings and discussions will focus on finding ways to account for the agency of Caribbean peoples while remaining aware of the power dynamics within which their bodies become legible within and outside of the region.

NOTE: ZERO textbook cost

 


 

PSY B9846: Psychology of Sexuality & Gender

Term/Time: Summer Term | Four Week - First (6/6-7/5)| Online | Synchronous | Mondays and Thursdays 8:30am - 11:00AM

Instructor: Sebastian Cordoba (he/him)

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course introduces theories and concepts regarding psychologies of gender and sexual diversity. We will review relevant research, and consider history, criminalization, pathologization, and depathologization of gender and sexual diversity. Students will gain a well-rounded background and will learn how this field of study relates to the present.

 


 

PSY 32200: Psychology of Sexuality & Gender

Term/Time: Summer Term | Four Week - First (6/6-7/5)| Online | Synchronous | Mondays and Thursdays 8:30am - 11:00AM

Instructor: Sebastian Cordoba (he/him)

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course introduces theories and concepts regarding psychologies of gender and sexual diversity. We will review relevant research, and consider history, criminalization, pathologization, and depathologization of gender and sexual diversity. Students will gain a well-rounded background and will learn how this field of study relates to the present.

 

 


 

 

PSY 35100: Psychology of Human Sexual Behavior

[cross-listed with WS 31107

Term/Time: Summer Term | Three Week - First (8/3-8/23) | Online | Synchronous | Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays 1:00PM - 4:20PM

Instructor: Leticia Perez (she/her)

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: Sexual behavior, attitudes, developments, and the consequences of the behavior are examined from a psychological perspective. Topics include historical and cross cultural view points, theories of human sexuality, gender roles, sexual dysfunction, sexual preference, psychological development of adult sexuality and aging sexuality

 


 

Spring 2022

PSY 8441J: Health of Lesbians/Gays/bisexuals

Term/Time: Spring Term | In-Person | Tuesdays 2:00PM - 3:50PM 

Instructor:  Margaret Rosario (she/her) ( mrosario@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: Doctoral Letter Grades

Description: Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals are a neglected segment of the population whose health has only recently been investigated systematically. The health of LGB individuals requires attention, given reports of poor mental and physical health. This course will examine the mental and physical health of LGB individuals.

 


 

EDCE 5700C: Multi-Cultural Education

Term/Time: Spring Term | In-Person | Synchronous | Wednesdays 4:50PM-7:20PM  

Instructor: Jesús Fraga (he/him) ( jfraga@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Graduate)

Description: Education that is Multicultural, EDCE 5700C, analyzes the various components of a desirable education in a pluralistic society, provides opportunities for developing curriculum and strategies which reflect respect and dignity for all people, examines students’ needs within a humanistic framework, and critically examines instructional materials for bias and enrichment. New York City is one of the most diverse cities in the world, and its teachers and students bring a spectrum of cultural, racial, linguistic, sexual orientations, and ethnic backgrounds to their classrooms. Schools play a large role in rejecting or affirming this diversity through an education that falls along the continuum of mono-cultural to multicultural. This course address five umbrella topics in Multicultural Education: 1. Immigration/Migration/ Refugees, 2. Race and Ethnicity, 3. Languages and Dialects, 4. Sexual Orientation/LGBTQ+, and 5. Religion. Furthermore, the course will assist students to reconsider personal assumptions and beliefs about diversity, and analyze how schools and society have set-up inequitable opportunities for some groups while maintaining the privilege of others. The course considers teaching as a political activity and explores ways for educators to “teach against the grain” through culturally and locally relevant pedagogy. 

NOTE: Required textbook: Affirming Diversity: The Sociopolitical Context of Multicultural Education, Author: Nieto, Sonia; Bode, Patty, Publisher: Pearson, Edition: 7, Year Published: 2017, Price: 27.45 USD, ISBN: 9780134047232

 


ARAB 31303: Minorities in Contemporary Middle Eastern Literature and Cultures

Term/Time: Spring Term | In-Person | Tuesdays and Thursdays 9:30AM - 10:45AM 

Instructor:  Jeremy Randall (he/him) ( jrandall@gradcenter.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course introduces students to modern and contemporary representations of minorities in the Middle East North Africa through a diverse selection of literature and cultural productions. Students will be introduced to short stories, novellas, films, and art by and about racial, ethnic, religious, and sexual minorities within and from the region. Students will examine how cultural, social, political, demographic, geographic, and economic situations can assemble and circulate minority identities throughout the region. [Potential topics that students will study include but are not limited to the Arab diaspora in France, LGBTQ+ communities in Lebanon, Iraqi Jews, domestic workers in the Emirates, and Afro-Palestinians.]

NOTE: Taught in English

 


 

BLST 31961: Queer Caribbean Writing

[cross-listed with ENGL 31933

Term/Time: Spring Term | In-Person | Mondays and Wednedays 9:30AM - 10:45AM 

Instructor:  Kedon Willis (he/him) ( kwillis@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: Queer Caribbean writing surveys the fiction, non-fiction, and poetry of queer Caribbean authors to examine how their engagement with crises facing the region integrates the experiences of gender and sexual non-conforming individuals. In this course, students will learn the major themes of Caribbean literature generally, while being introduced to the basic principles of queer and postcolonial ideas as expressed in the literature. Students can expect to interact with writings from diverse national settings, including Jamaica, Haiti, The Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Guyana and Trinidad and Tobago.

NOTE: Low textbook cost

 


 

ENGL 45402: Advanced Topics in Medieval and Early Modern Literature: Medieval Bodies

Term/Time: Spring Term | In-Person | Tuesdays and Thursdays 2:00PM - 3:15PM 

Instructor:  Elizabeth Mazzola (she/her) ( emazzola@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: Medieval bodies are bodies in flux; they can be male and/or female; transcendent or transgender; holy, airborne, animal, wounded, armored, even reborn. This course will survey readings from Beowulf to Malory, covering Anglo-Saxon poems from the 8th century all the way to 15th century Arthurian romances, and looking for ideas about and ambitions for managing flesh. We will also seek out contemporary parallels and examine questions plaguing bodies even nowadays like: What renders a body dead or illegal or disabled? How might gender conformity pave the way for love or divine favor? how do gender rules change over time, with wealth or with special equipment? What ennobles beastly bodies or gives trees souls and songs?

NOTE: ZERO textbook costs

 


 

HIST 31685: LGTBQ World History 

[cross-listed with ANTH 31685 & WS 31685] 

Term/Time: Spring Term | In-Person | Synchronous | Tuesdays and Thursdays 5:00PM - 6:15PM

Instructor: Dr. Yaari Felber-Seligman (they/them) ( yfelberseligman@ccny.cuny.edu

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course focuses on the history, contributions, and experiences of gender and sexually-diverse individuals throughout world history, with particular emphasis on nonwestern cultures. It broadly explores changes and debates within the field of history as a whole and the stakes of centering historical analysis on individuals often overlooked or erased by mainstream history writing. The course will balance big-picture discussions with case studies drawn from the instructor’s geographic expertise. These will include examples of precolonial LGBTQ history, how nonwestern cultures conceptualized gender and sexual diversity, the fraught imperial and colonial periods, and contemporary historians’ efforts to diversify curriculums and public knowledge. Students will research a related topic of their choice and develop a final project that can take the form of a research proposal, a teaching unit, or a presentation for the public (such as a film proposal, informative website, podcast series, etc). 

NOTE: All readings and materials will be ZERO cost

 


 

LALS 31998-S: Latinas in Transition and Translation  

[cross-listed with INTL 31973 & WS 31994] 

Term/Time: Spring Term | In-Person | Synchronous | Tuesdays and Thursdays 5:00PM - 6:15PM

Instructor: Prof. Mariana Romo-Carmona (she/her) ( mromocarmona@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Course Description: This course will study the contributions of Latina writers to the field of Latinx Studies in the U.S. Through their literary and scholarly work we explore the roots of Latinx culture in this country and how the politics of race, gender, and class have defined the field with Latinas at the forefront of the struggle. 

NOTE: No textbooks required

 


 

PSY 357: Community Psychology 

Term/Time: Spring Term | In-Person | NAC 7/220 | Synchronous | Tuesdays and Thursdays 11:00AM - 12:15PM 

Instructor: Richard Clark (she/they) ( r.connorclark@gmail.com

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This is an OER-based Zero-cost course designed to introduce students to the field of community psychology. Community psychology is primarily concerned with individuals in their social context. Community psychology seeks to support and understand communities and conduct research that helps these communities thrive. Sometimes community psychology engages more broadly doing work focused on the large connected and diverse communities such as the Black community and sometimes it more focused such as a community of students at a single university. As a critical community psychologist myself my focus has always been on social justice, change, and activism. As such this course will engage with critical theories, concepts, and methods within the field of community psychology. In doing so it is my hope that students will gain a deeper understanding of community psychology. The course will move away from and challenge the traditional community deficit models and instead emphasize community psychology that focuses on community issues, engagement, empowerment, activism, and work. 

NOTE: All readings and materials will be ZERO cost

 


 

PSY 31158: Queer Psychology

Term/Time: Spring Term | In-Person | Mondays and Wednedays 11:00AM - 12:15PM 

Instructor:  Christopher Hoffman (he/him) ( choffman@gradcenter.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: What is queerness and what does it have to do with psychology? In this course, we will attempt to “queer” psychology by applying a critical lens to psychology’s study of sexuality and gender. Together, we will examine issues of queerness, identity, physical and social environments within the field of psychology.

NOTE: ZERO textbook cost

 


 

THTR 21700: Queer Theatre

Term/Time: Spring Term | In-Person | Mondays and Wednesdays 3:30PM - 4:45PM 

Instructor:  Kiera Bono (she/her) ( kbono@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: An exploration of LGBTQ identity as portrayed in predominantly American dramas of the past century. Students will learn about key figures and texts, starting with Oscar Wilde, followed by consideration of stereotypical and groundbreaking portrayals of queer people, as well as analyzing plays with themes of homophobia, self-hatred, acceptance, AIDS, familial interaction, and the evolution of the LGBTQ rights movement in a hetero-normative society.

 


 

WS 31012: LGBTQ History, Culture and Movements

Term/Time: Spring Term | Online | Mondays and Wednesdays 11:00AM - 12:15PM 

Instructor:  Jasmina Sinanović (they/them) ( jsinanovic@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course traces the history of LGBTQ people as well as struggles for recognition and acceptance both in the US and globally. With attention to how sexual identity intersects with race, class and gender, the course will examine how LGBTQ people can be placed within historical and political contexts. We will question how and why homosexuality became criminalized and the movements that led to decriminalization. We will spend a significant portion of time on the USA and Western Europe in the 19th and 20th century and the development of a contemporary LGBTQ movement. We will also look at how people of various gender identities and sexualities lived before and outside of European colonial context and explore how European colonization influenced changes in perception of people with gender variant identities as well as people outside of heteronormative sexual practices in their local communities.

NOTE: ZERO textbook cost

Winter Session 2022

BIO 46000: Animal Behavior 

Term/Time: Winter term | Online | Synchronous and Asynchronous | (select one time frame) MoTuWeThFr 8:30AM-9:00AM or 9:30AM-10:00AM or 10:00AM-10:30AM

Instructor: David J. Lohman ( dlohman@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Graduate)

Description: The biological bases of behavior, with emphasis on such topics as the development, evolution, genetics and ecology of behavior; sensory physiology; social behavior and communication. This is a flipped, online course. Students will read one textbook chapter and watch one pre-recorded lecture prior to attending one of the synchronous, 30-minute discussion sections each day. Both exams in the course will be asynchronous and can be taken during any two-hour window of time within a specified 24-hour period. 

NOTE: Required textbook: Principles of Animal Behavior, 4th Edition, Author: Dugatkin, Lee Alan, Publisher: University of Chicago Press, Edition: 4, Year Published: 2019, Price: 46.11 USD, ISBN: 9780226448381

Last Updated: 07/10/2024 17:38