CCNY Courses on LGBTQ+ Topics

Please find here a list of courses (by semester) that include LGBTQ+ topics, case studies, and content. We recognize that terms are variable (and debated) so by LGBTQ+ topics, please understand that we warmly invite faculty, departments, and programs to list all courses that include LGBTQ+ content broadly defined, namely topics related to the fields of queer studies, topics/individuals/experiences related to gender diversity and/or sexual diversity and, of course, their many intersecting identities.  

Have a course you wish to be added? Please share with us the course title, course number, course days, time, and format (in person, hybrid, Hyflex, virtual) along with the instructor name, the instructor’s email, and the CUNYFirst description. Reach us at:  LGBTQ@ccny.cuny.edu  or fill out our Google Form here!

**Courses are alphabetized by Undergraduate/Graduate/PhD, then first listed department/program name, then course title, then courses from other CUNY campuses (made upon request by our CUNY colleagues).** 

Fall 2022

ANTH 20104: Cross-Cultural Perspectives 

Term: Fall Term | In-Person | Wednesdays 6:30PM - 9:00PM 

Instructor/Time/Location: 

1. James Tolleson | Tuesday, Thursday 11:00AM - 12:15PM | Room TBA

2. James Tolleson | Tuesday, Thursday 9:30AM - 10:45AM | Room TBA

3. Ola Galal | Friday 11:00AM - 1:30PM | Room TBA

4. Ola Galal | Thursday 2:00PM - 3:15PM | Room TBA

5. Jennifer Lutton (she/her) ( jlutton@ccny.cuny.edu ) | Monday, Wednesday 5:00PM - 6:15PM | Room TBA

6. Susanna Rosenbaum (she/her) ( srosenbaum@ccny.cuny.edu ) | Tuesday 6:00PM - 9:20PM | Room TBA

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This class provides a general overview of the field of socio-cultural anthropology. As this class is an excursion into the field of socio-cultural anthropology, our main goal will be to understand, complicate, and theorize “culture.” Students are expected to leave with a fuller understanding of socio-cultural anthropology, ethnographic method, and the complexities of cultural life. The main questions in this class will be: What is culture? How do cultural practices vary across social contexts? How can culture be multiple and contradictory? What does an ethnographic method look like to study culture? Students will leave this class with a greater grasp of the “culture” concept and ethnographic methodologies.

 


 

ANTH 20200: Language in Cross-Cultural Perspective

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Tuesday, Thursday 9:30AM - 10:45AM 

Instructor:  Andy Tan ( ztan@gradcenter.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course introduces students to the study of language from an anthropological perspective. Topics include the structure of language and its relationship to other kinds of communication; language use in face-to-face interactions; the relationship of language to class, race, ethnicity, gender, and other forms of social difference; and the role of language in mass-media

 


 

ANTH 31256: Masculinity and Latinidad: Redefining Masculinities in the U.S.

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Tuesday 5:00PM - 6:15PM 

Instructor:  Mariana Romo-Carmona (she/her) ( mromocarmona@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: The concept of hegemonic masculinity has been used to explain societal behaviors in terms of men's power over women. In this course, we will analyze the connection to the marginalization of Latinx communities in mainstream U.S. culture, and the way stereotypical cultural attitudes are too easily attributed to machismo and stagnant characterizations of Latinx men, i.e., behaviors that conform to racist expectations of men of color. We will also explore how Latinx men break with tradition in the arts, literature, and popular culture

 


 

ANTH 32400: Violation of Human Rights

Term/Time: Fall Term | Online - Synchronous | Tuesday, Thursday 11:00AM - 12:15PM 

Instructor:  Margarita-Asha Samad-Matias ( asamadmatias@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: A review of the development of human rights accords and legislation, followed by an examination of international institutions overseeing and enforcing human rights standards. Special attention will be given to media and institutional responses to human rights issues, such as those tied to international, regional, and class injustices, with an emphasis on situations involving women and social minorities/oppressed groups

 


 

ART B8711: Gender and Sexuality in Mughal Arts

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Thursday 2:00PM - 4:50PM 

Instructor:  Molly Emma Aitken (she/her) ( maitken@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Graduate)

Description: Early critical theory in art history addressed questions of gender and sexuality to the European tradition, and that shaped how the discipline, even today, conceptualizes the male gaze and the formative role of images in the formation of sexual subjectivities. This class turns to the visual arts of South Asia during the Mughal period (1556-1858) to consider a different regime of gender, sexuality and the image. What does it mean to theorize gender and sexuality outside European traditions? We revisit canonic readings on these topics, as well as examples of critical thinking about gender and sexuality from other areas of art history. We consider how historians of Mughal art have begun to find a way forward to deal with Mughal works of art that put sexuality front and center of political and social discourse, and together we consider possible avenues for the future

 


 

BLST 31179: Black Queer Subjectivities

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Thursday, Thursday 2:00PM - 3:15PM 

Instructor:  Abdul-Qadir Islam (he/him)

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: Black Queer Subjectivities will examine LGBTQ communities throughout the African Diaspora mostly through the lens of historical work. The course will span the 14th century to the present across the African Diaspora. Students will engage in robust discussion about both historical works as well as literary and film products connected the LGBTQ communities across the African Diaspora

 


 

EDCE 5700C: Multi-Cultural Education

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Synchronous | Wednesdays 4:50PM-7:20PM 

Instructor: Jesús Fraga (he/him) ( jfraga@ccny.cuny.edu

Credits: 3 Credits (Graduate) 

Description: Education that is Multicultural, EDCE 5700C, analyzes the various components of a desirable education in a pluralistic society, provides opportunities for developing curriculum and strategies which reflect respect and dignity for all people, examines students’ needs within a humanistic framework, and critically examines instructional materials for bias and enrichment. New York City is one of the most diverse cities in the world, and its teachers and students bring a spectrum of cultural, racial, linguistic, sexual orientations, and ethnic backgrounds to their classrooms. Schools play a large role in rejecting or affirming this diversity through an education that falls along the continuum of mono-cultural to multicultural. This course address five umbrella topics in Multicultural Education: 1. Immigration/Migration/ Refugees, 2. Race and Ethnicity, 3. Languages and Dialects, 4. Sexual Orientation/LGBTQ+, and 5. Religion. Furthermore, the course will assist students to reconsider personal assumptions and beliefs about diversity, and analyze how schools and society have set-up inequitable opportunities for some groups while maintaining the privilege of others. The course considers teaching as a political activity and explores ways for educators to “teach against the grain” through culturally and locally relevant pedagogy. 

NOTE: Required textbook: Affirming Diversity: The Sociopolitical Context of Multicultural Education, Author: Nieto, Sonia; Bode, Patty, Publisher: Pearson, Edition: 7, Year Published: 2017, Price: 27.45 USD, ISBN: 9780134047232

 


 

HIST B0704: History of South Africa

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Synchronous | Tuesdays 4:50PM-6:50PM

Instructor: Yaari Felber-Seligman (they/them) ( yfelberseligman@ccny.cuny.edu

Credits: 3 Credits (Graduate) 

Description: Includes some LGBTQ+ content. Home to some of the earliest humans, the long history of South Africa represents themes that mirror broader African history and also key struggles that shaped the United States. The course explores the complex history of southern Africa as a region and the country of South Africa specifically. Through a series of case studies, it highlights important cultural, social, economic, and political themes along with past scholars' approaches to them. The course also delves into the complexities of recent identity politics, historical memory, and public history projects in South Africa, all impacted by the country's earlier history.

 


 

HIST 27600/BLST 31201: Africa and the Modern World

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Synchronous | Tuesdays, Thursdays 2:00PM-3:15PM 

Instructor: Yaari Felber-Seligman (they/them) ( yfelberseligman@ccny.cuny.edu

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate) 

Description: Includes some LGBTQ+ content. This course explores the dynamics of history, economy, society, and politics in Africa from 1500 to present. Topics include Africa-world interactions, the growth of African states, economies, and cities, and changing forms of popular culture, gender, and livelihoods. The course will move between discussions of Africa-wide developments and local events. Rather than sharply divide African history into precolonial, and postcolonial segments, it will explore changes and continuities. Moving between discussions of Africa-wide developments and case studies of remarkable individuals and specific African societies, the course examines how the history of five key centuries continues to define Africa today.

 


 

LALS 31118: Racialization: Single Mothers, Sexual and Religious Minorities

[cross-listed with SOC 31145]

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Monday, Wednesday 11:00AM - 12:15PM 

Instructor:  Norma Fuentes-Mayorga (she/her) ( nfuentes@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course offers an introduction to the study of minority and majority group relations in the United States with a comparative focus drawing from examples in Latin America and Europe. We examine the historical factors that have led to the creation of a white majority and a black minority in America and other national contexts; how a minority or majority status is created and internalized by individuals and their youth. We pay close attention to how increasing economic and wealth inequality, globalization and immigration affects the formation of new, minority groups and statuses drawing on the example of growing share of working poor or 'missing class' individuals in America; the life chances of the undocumented, and those of single migrant mothers, religious minorities such as Muslim youth and the networks of sexual minorities that help them integrate in society and cope with glaring discrimination and exclusion. Students will be able to engage in informed debates about how increases in family, ethnic, racial and sexual diversity in the US and other nations will help close the historical divides between white and black groups in America. They will also master new knowledge on how race and racialization processes take place in Latin America or in nations such as Brazil and the Dominican Republic where efforts have been made to alleviate racial inequality and tensions, but where blacks and mulattoes have historically make up the majority of the poor and whites and light-skin people still make up the ruling elite.

 


 

MCA 34100: Radio Journalism

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Thursdays 6:30PM - 9:00PM 

Instructor:  Camille Petersen (she/her) ( camillefvpetersen@gmail.com )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This is a basic course in radio reporting and production. Students learn to write for the ear and incorporate the creative uses of sound in telling a news story. Production techniques are an integral part of the course Students receive actual on-air experience in the news department of WHCR, the college's community radio station. No prerequisites required. Note from Professor Petersen: "The class is an excellent space for students to tell stories about LGBTQ+ lives and issues. It's also a space for telling their own stories. In the class, they'll learn how to report, write, and edit audio stories and get hands-on experience with podcasting."

 


 

 

PSY B9904: Decolonizing Mental Health

[cross-listed with PSY 31191] 

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Wednesdays 6:30PM - 9:00PM 

Instructor:  Lewis Zuchman (he/him) ( lzuchman@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Graduate AND Undergraduate)

Description: Decolonization is the process of deconstructing colonial ideologies of the superiority and privilege of Western (White Patriarchal) thought and approaches. While decolonization is generally considered in reference to geo-political systemic structures, its applicability to mental health service delivery is of critical import to psychology. Colonization perpetuates the status quo, maintaining power dominance of a White, Patriarchal, Racist, Homophobic hierarchy. Western mental health and social service methodologies serve to perpetuate colonization, justifying the dominance of a White, Patriarchal systemic structure. This course will serve to examine the systemic implication of a mental health service delivery that ‘blames the victim’, and perpetuates an oppressive systemic culture that deleteriously impacts the lives of women, immigrants, folk of color, LGBTQ folk, etc. Western mental health focuses on pathology, branding traumatized and oppressed folk as 'ill', mentally unbalanced, paranoid, 'out of control', etc. Decolonizing mental health service delivery enables the psychology student to focus on a Strength Based approach, that emphasizes 'positives', and, employs a non-directive, empowering therapeutic stance. The psychologist/therapist is neither god, nor more powerful all-knowing. Rather, a decolonizing mental health approach emphasizes the partnership of therapist and patient. The therapist listens, shares, participates in full partnership with his/her patient. Illuminating this course will be the writings and clinical practice of Frantz Fanon, an Afro-French psychiatrist and 1960's spokesperson of the successful Algerian Revolution against French colonial oppression. Finally, the empowerment process inherent in therapeutic healing, is embedded within an understanding of context and trauma. Oppressed folk reflect rage, resistance, as well as internalization of said oppression, resulting in self-destructive behavior. Enabling such folk to see, feel, and comprehend their oppression is a critical first step in healing.

 


 

PSY 31158: Queer Psychology

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Friday 12:30PM - 3:00PM 

Instructor:  Christopher Hoffman (he/him) ( choffman@gradcenter.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: What is queerness and what does it have to do with psychology? In this course, we will attempt to “queer” psychology by applying a critical lens to psychology’s study of sexuality and gender. Together, we will examine issues of queerness, identity, physical and social environments within the field of psychology

 


 

PSY 31914: LGBTQ+ Counseling

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Tuesday, Thursday 6:30PM - 7:45PM 

Instructor:  Hailey Wojcik

Credits: 3-9 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course aims to empower clinicians to conduct culturally-competent, evidence-based clinical mental health care with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, non-binary, queer, intersex, and often unnamed gender-expansive communities. We will discuss historical and contemporary issues, as well as best practices and guidelines for mental health counselors working within youth, college/university, and hospital/healthcare settings. Students will also engage in self-reflection to examine the ways in which their own identities and experiences may influence therapist-client dynamics.

 


 

PSY 8343J: Sex and Gender

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Tuesday 9:45AM - 11:45AM 

Instructor:  Margaret Rosario (she/her) ( mrosario@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Graduate)

Description: This course aims to address the determinants, development, and implications for mental and physical health and for positive adaptation of sex and gender identities. By the end of the course, the student should appreciate and understand the biopsychosocial factors underlying sex and gender, as well as the relations of those factors to health

 


 

PSY V5650: Gender and Psychopathology

Term/Time: Fall Term | Online-Synchronous | Monday 6:30PM - 9:00PM 

Instructor:  Brett Silverstein (he/him) ( bsilverstein@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Graduate)

Description: The course will focus on theories and findings related to why specific psychological disorders tend to be much more prevalent among women and others tend to be much more prevalent among men. Readings will include theoretical work on gender, studies of the methodology used in relating gender and psychopathology, and research on the connection between gender and particular disorders, including perhaps depression, some anxiety disorders, disordered eating, autism, and conduct disorder.

 


 

SOC 31910: Science of Sex and Gender

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Tuesday, Thursday 11:00AM - 12:15PM 

Instructors:  Christine Li (she/her) ( cli@ccny.cuny.edu ), Maritsa Poros (she/her) ( mporos@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course will explore the biological basis of sex and sociological understandings of gender, including where the two intersect. The interaction between genes on the Y chromosome with genes on other chromosomes to determine biological sex will be explored. The course will also explore the social construction of gender and how gendered identities shape everyday life, including at the intersection of sex and gender

 


 

SOC 38210: Sociology of Gender

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Monday, Wednesday 9:30AM - 10:45AM 

Instructor:  Benjamin Porter

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: TBA (See CUNYfirst for updates)

 


 

THTR 31115: LGBT Film and Theatre

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Tuesday, Thursday 2:00PM - 3:15PM 

Instructor:  Brandon Judell (he/him) ( bjudell@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: A celebratory exploration of queer identity as portrayed in international theatre and films in the post-Stonewall era, from 1969 on.  We will explore presentations of both stereotypical and emancipated portrayals of gay people dealing with homophobia, self-hatred, acceptance, AIDS, familial interaction, and the evolution of the GLBT rights movement in a heteronormative society.

 


 

WS 10000: Women's Gender Roles in Contemporary Society

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Monday, Wednesday 12:30PM - 1:45PM 

Instructor:  Jasmina Sinanovic (they/them) ( jsinanovic@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: An introduction to issues that arise when women's lives and gender roles become the focus of critical inquiry. How do different societies and academic disciplines define women? How do women's experiences vary in relation to factors such as race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, age and nationality? How have women resisted, adapted to, and transformed "women's space" in the United States and elsewhere?

 


 

WS 24659: Anthropology of Gender & Sexuality

Term/Time: Fall Term | Online-Synchronous | Monday, Wednesday 12:00PM - 1:45PM 

Instructor:  Katherine Stefatos (she/her)

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course explores how gender and sexuality are iterated, performed, challenged, and managed. Instead of seeing gender and sexuality as coherent and easily quantifiable categories, this class delves into the many contradictions in the categories of gender and sexuality in order to unpack everyday taken for granted assumptions. Furthermore, students will examine how these categories intersect, how they inform each other, and how they gain traction with race, class, and ethnicity.

 


 

WS 31715: Black Gay Art and Ideology After AIDS

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Thursday 5:00PM - 7:50PM 

Instructor:  TBA (see CUNYfirst for updates)

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course will examine African American history, literature, art, theater, performance, film and fashion. This interdisciplinary approach will examine, in particular, black gay men and the distinct creative and political identity they have created about race and sexuality. After the discovery of AIDS in 1981, gay men faced a great deal of prejudice, discrimination and isolation. One way they countered the exclusion, silence and hate, was through artistic mediums. Their creative responses to the dual prejudices of racism and homophobia will be discussed and analyzed with visits from men who created during the 80’s and 90’s and by viewing performances

 


 

(Hunter College) ASIAN 390.19/WGS 300.38: Asian American Queerness

Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Tuesdays and Fridays 4:00PM - 5:15PM 

Instructor:  Glenn Magpantay ( gmagpant@hunter.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course will explore the issues, struggles, political organizing, and theory of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) Asian Americans, South Asians, Southeast Asians, and Pacific Islanders.  Through readings of historical and modern texts, law and public policy, film and video, guest speakers, and field work, students will come to understand the intersection between LGBT identity and racial/ ethnic identity.

 


 

(John Jay) POL 318: The Law and Politics of LGBTQ Rights

#1 Term/Time: Fall Term | In-Person | Thursday 10:50AM - 12:05PM 

#2 Term/Time: Fall Term | Online-Asynchronous 

#1 Instructor: Katie Zuber

#2 Instructor: Natalie Johnson

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: The course explores legal and political issues affecting lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) people in the United States. It focuses in particular on contests over the criminalization of same-sex activity; the enactment of legal protections for LGBTQ people and their families; the marriage equality movement; and contemporary debates over the scope of federal non-discrimination protections, transgender rights, and exemptions for those who object to LGBTQ equality on religious grounds. The course aims to give students a deeper appreciation of the constraints, opportunities, and strategic choices that have shaped the development of LGBTQ rights in law and policy, both historically and in the present day.

Summer 2022

LALS 31313: Caribbean Sexualities: Power and Privilege

Term/Time: Summer Term | Four Week - First (6/6 - 7/5) | Online | Asynchronous

Instructor: Daniel Nieves (he/him) ( dnieves@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course examines Caribbean sexualities—identity, desire, interaction, and structure—with a particular emphasis on the Spanish Caribbean, allowing students to explore themes useful for them in developing a broad comparative perspective on the region. The course takes as a fundamental premise that since the first moments of “contact” with Europeans, the insertion of the Caribbean into the global economy has been crucially marked by relations of inequality. This inequality is negotiated through the representation and commoditization of bodies and desires. The readings and discussions will focus on finding ways to account for the agency of Caribbean peoples while remaining aware of the power dynamics within which their bodies become legible within and outside of the region.

NOTE: ZERO textbook cost

 


 

PSY B9846: Psychology of Sexuality & Gender

Term/Time: Summer Term | Four Week - First (6/6-7/5)| Online | Synchronous | Mondays and Thursdays 8:30am - 11:00AM

Instructor: Sebastian Cordoba (he/him)

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course introduces theories and concepts regarding psychologies of gender and sexual diversity. We will review relevant research, and consider history, criminalization, pathologization, and depathologization of gender and sexual diversity. Students will gain a well-rounded background and will learn how this field of study relates to the present.

 


 

PSY 32200: Psychology of Sexuality & Gender

Term/Time: Summer Term | Four Week - First (6/6-7/5)| Online | Synchronous | Mondays and Thursdays 8:30am - 11:00AM

Instructor: Sebastian Cordoba (he/him)

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course introduces theories and concepts regarding psychologies of gender and sexual diversity. We will review relevant research, and consider history, criminalization, pathologization, and depathologization of gender and sexual diversity. Students will gain a well-rounded background and will learn how this field of study relates to the present.

 

 


 

 

PSY 35100: Psychology of Human Sexual Behavior

[cross-listed with WS 31107

Term/Time: Summer Term | Three Week - First (8/3-8/23) | Online | Synchronous | Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays 1:00PM - 4:20PM

Instructor: Leticia Perez (she/her)

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: Sexual behavior, attitudes, developments, and the consequences of the behavior are examined from a psychological perspective. Topics include historical and cross cultural view points, theories of human sexuality, gender roles, sexual dysfunction, sexual preference, psychological development of adult sexuality and aging sexuality

 


 

Winter Session 2022

BIO 46000: Animal Behavior 

Term/Time: Winter term | Online | Synchronous and Asynchronous | (select one time frame) MoTuWeThFr 8:30AM-9:00AM or 9:30AM-10:00AM or 10:00AM-10:30AM

Instructor: David J. Lohman ( dlohman@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Graduate)

Description: The biological bases of behavior, with emphasis on such topics as the development, evolution, genetics and ecology of behavior; sensory physiology; social behavior and communication. This is a flipped, online course. Students will read one textbook chapter and watch one pre-recorded lecture prior to attending one of the synchronous, 30-minute discussion sections each day. Both exams in the course will be asynchronous and can be taken during any two-hour window of time within a specified 24-hour period. 

NOTE: Required textbook: Principles of Animal Behavior, 4th Edition, Author: Dugatkin, Lee Alan, Publisher: University of Chicago Press, Edition: 4, Year Published: 2019, Price: 46.11 USD, ISBN: 9780226448381

Spring 2022

PSY 8441J: Health of Lesbians/Gays/bisexuals

Term/Time: Spring Term | In-Person | Tuesdays 2:00PM - 3:50PM 

Instructor:  Margaret Rosario (she/her) ( mrosario@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: Doctoral Letter Grades

Description: Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals are a neglected segment of the population whose health has only recently been investigated systematically. The health of LGB individuals requires attention, given reports of poor mental and physical health. This course will examine the mental and physical health of LGB individuals.

 


 

EDCE 5700C: Multi-Cultural Education

Term/Time: Spring Term | In-Person | Synchronous | Wednesdays 4:50PM-7:20PM  

Instructor: Jesús Fraga (he/him) ( jfraga@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Graduate)

Description: Education that is Multicultural, EDCE 5700C, analyzes the various components of a desirable education in a pluralistic society, provides opportunities for developing curriculum and strategies which reflect respect and dignity for all people, examines students’ needs within a humanistic framework, and critically examines instructional materials for bias and enrichment. New York City is one of the most diverse cities in the world, and its teachers and students bring a spectrum of cultural, racial, linguistic, sexual orientations, and ethnic backgrounds to their classrooms. Schools play a large role in rejecting or affirming this diversity through an education that falls along the continuum of mono-cultural to multicultural. This course address five umbrella topics in Multicultural Education: 1. Immigration/Migration/ Refugees, 2. Race and Ethnicity, 3. Languages and Dialects, 4. Sexual Orientation/LGBTQ+, and 5. Religion. Furthermore, the course will assist students to reconsider personal assumptions and beliefs about diversity, and analyze how schools and society have set-up inequitable opportunities for some groups while maintaining the privilege of others. The course considers teaching as a political activity and explores ways for educators to “teach against the grain” through culturally and locally relevant pedagogy. 

NOTE: Required textbook: Affirming Diversity: The Sociopolitical Context of Multicultural Education, Author: Nieto, Sonia; Bode, Patty, Publisher: Pearson, Edition: 7, Year Published: 2017, Price: 27.45 USD, ISBN: 9780134047232

 


ARAB 31303: Minorities in Contemporary Middle Eastern Literature and Cultures

Term/Time: Spring Term | In-Person | Tuesdays and Thursdays 9:30AM - 10:45AM 

Instructor:  Jeremy Randall (he/him) ( jrandall@gradcenter.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course introduces students to modern and contemporary representations of minorities in the Middle East North Africa through a diverse selection of literature and cultural productions. Students will be introduced to short stories, novellas, films, and art by and about racial, ethnic, religious, and sexual minorities within and from the region. Students will examine how cultural, social, political, demographic, geographic, and economic situations can assemble and circulate minority identities throughout the region. [Potential topics that students will study include but are not limited to the Arab diaspora in France, LGBTQ+ communities in Lebanon, Iraqi Jews, domestic workers in the Emirates, and Afro-Palestinians.]

NOTE: Taught in English

 


 

BLST 31961: Queer Caribbean Writing

[cross-listed with ENGL 31933

Term/Time: Spring Term | In-Person | Mondays and Wednedays 9:30AM - 10:45AM 

Instructor:  Kedon Willis (he/him) ( kwillis@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: Queer Caribbean writing surveys the fiction, non-fiction, and poetry of queer Caribbean authors to examine how their engagement with crises facing the region integrates the experiences of gender and sexual non-conforming individuals. In this course, students will learn the major themes of Caribbean literature generally, while being introduced to the basic principles of queer and postcolonial ideas as expressed in the literature. Students can expect to interact with writings from diverse national settings, including Jamaica, Haiti, The Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Guyana and Trinidad and Tobago.

NOTE: Low textbook cost

 


 

ENGL 45402: Advanced Topics in Medieval and Early Modern Literature: Medieval Bodies

Term/Time: Spring Term | In-Person | Tuesdays and Thursdays 2:00PM - 3:15PM 

Instructor:  Elizabeth Mazzola (she/her) ( emazzola@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: Medieval bodies are bodies in flux; they can be male and/or female; transcendent or transgender; holy, airborne, animal, wounded, armored, even reborn. This course will survey readings from Beowulf to Malory, covering Anglo-Saxon poems from the 8th century all the way to 15th century Arthurian romances, and looking for ideas about and ambitions for managing flesh. We will also seek out contemporary parallels and examine questions plaguing bodies even nowadays like: What renders a body dead or illegal or disabled? How might gender conformity pave the way for love or divine favor? how do gender rules change over time, with wealth or with special equipment? What ennobles beastly bodies or gives trees souls and songs?

NOTE: ZERO textbook costs

 


 

HIST 31685: LGTBQ World History 

[cross-listed with ANTH 31685 & WS 31685] 

Term/Time: Spring Term | In-Person | Synchronous | Tuesdays and Thursdays 5:00PM - 6:15PM

Instructor: Dr. Yaari Felber-Seligman (they/them) ( yfelberseligman@ccny.cuny.edu

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course focuses on the history, contributions, and experiences of gender and sexually-diverse individuals throughout world history, with particular emphasis on nonwestern cultures. It broadly explores changes and debates within the field of history as a whole and the stakes of centering historical analysis on individuals often overlooked or erased by mainstream history writing. The course will balance big-picture discussions with case studies drawn from the instructor’s geographic expertise. These will include examples of precolonial LGBTQ history, how nonwestern cultures conceptualized gender and sexual diversity, the fraught imperial and colonial periods, and contemporary historians’ efforts to diversify curriculums and public knowledge. Students will research a related topic of their choice and develop a final project that can take the form of a research proposal, a teaching unit, or a presentation for the public (such as a film proposal, informative website, podcast series, etc). 

NOTE: All readings and materials will be ZERO cost

 


 

LALS 31998-S: Latinas in Transition and Translation  

[cross-listed with INTL 31973 & WS 31994] 

Term/Time: Spring Term | In-Person | Synchronous | Tuesdays and Thursdays 5:00PM - 6:15PM

Instructor: Prof. Mariana Romo-Carmona (she/her) ( mromocarmona@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Course Description: This course will study the contributions of Latina writers to the field of Latinx Studies in the U.S. Through their literary and scholarly work we explore the roots of Latinx culture in this country and how the politics of race, gender, and class have defined the field with Latinas at the forefront of the struggle. 

NOTE: No textbooks required

 


 

PSY 357: Community Psychology 

Term/Time: Spring Term | In-Person | NAC 7/220 | Synchronous | Tuesdays and Thursdays 11:00AM - 12:15PM 

Instructor: Richard Clark (she/they) ( r.connorclark@gmail.com

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This is an OER-based Zero-cost course designed to introduce students to the field of community psychology. Community psychology is primarily concerned with individuals in their social context. Community psychology seeks to support and understand communities and conduct research that helps these communities thrive. Sometimes community psychology engages more broadly doing work focused on the large connected and diverse communities such as the Black community and sometimes it more focused such as a community of students at a single university. As a critical community psychologist myself my focus has always been on social justice, change, and activism. As such this course will engage with critical theories, concepts, and methods within the field of community psychology. In doing so it is my hope that students will gain a deeper understanding of community psychology. The course will move away from and challenge the traditional community deficit models and instead emphasize community psychology that focuses on community issues, engagement, empowerment, activism, and work. 

NOTE: All readings and materials will be ZERO cost

 


 

PSY 31191: Decolonizing Mental Health

Term/Time: Spring Term | In-Person | Wednesdays 3:30PM - 6:00PM 

Instructor:  Lewis Zuchman (he/him) ( lzuchman@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: Decolonization is the process of deconstructing colonial ideologies of the superiority and privilege of Western (White Patriarchal) thought and approaches. While decolonization is generally considered in reference to geo-political systemic structures, its applicability to mental health service delivery is of critical import to psychology. Colonization perpetuates the status quo, maintaining power dominance of a White, Patriarchal, Racist, Homophobic hierarchy. Western mental health and social service methodologies serve to perpetuate colonization, justifying the dominance of a White, Patriarchal systemic structure. This course will serve to examine the systemic implication of a mental health service delivery that ‘blames the victim’, and perpetuates an oppressive systemic culture that deleteriously impacts the lives of women, immigrants, folk of color, LGBTQ folk, etc.

 


 

PSY 31158: Queer Psychology

Term/Time: Spring Term | In-Person | Mondays and Wednedays 11:00AM - 12:15PM 

Instructor:  Christopher Hoffman (he/him) ( choffman@gradcenter.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: What is queerness and what does it have to do with psychology? In this course, we will attempt to “queer” psychology by applying a critical lens to psychology’s study of sexuality and gender. Together, we will examine issues of queerness, identity, physical and social environments within the field of psychology.

NOTE: ZERO textbook cost

 


 

THTR 21700: Queer Theatre

Term/Time: Spring Term | In-Person | Mondays and Wednesdays 3:30PM - 4:45PM 

Instructor:  Kiera Bono (she/her) ( kbono@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: An exploration of LGBTQ identity as portrayed in predominantly American dramas of the past century. Students will learn about key figures and texts, starting with Oscar Wilde, followed by consideration of stereotypical and groundbreaking portrayals of queer people, as well as analyzing plays with themes of homophobia, self-hatred, acceptance, AIDS, familial interaction, and the evolution of the LGBTQ rights movement in a hetero-normative society.

 


 

WS 31012: LGBTQ History, Culture and Movements

Term/Time: Spring Term | Online | Mondays and Wednesdays 11:00AM - 12:15PM 

Instructor:  Jasmina Sinanović (they/them) ( jsinanovic@ccny.cuny.edu )

Credits: 3 Credits (Undergraduate)

Description: This course traces the history of LGBTQ people as well as struggles for recognition and acceptance both in the US and globally. With attention to how sexual identity intersects with race, class and gender, the course will examine how LGBTQ people can be placed within historical and political contexts. We will question how and why homosexuality became criminalized and the movements that led to decriminalization. We will spend a significant portion of time on the USA and Western Europe in the 19th and 20th century and the development of a contemporary LGBTQ movement. We will also look at how people of various gender identities and sexualities lived before and outside of European colonial context and explore how European colonization influenced changes in perception of people with gender variant identities as well as people outside of heteronormative sexual practices in their local communities.

NOTE: ZERO textbook cost

Last Updated: 07/20/2022 14:16