Undergraduate and Graduate Courses by Semester

Winter 2022

Winter 2022 Semester: January 3, 2022 - January 24, 2022

 

UNDERGRAD COURSE OFFERINGS

HIST 24100 – The United States Since 1865

           

Examines the social conflicts that accompanied the transformation of the United States from an agrarian republic and slave society to one of the most powerful industrial nations in the world. Particular attention will be paid to the building of new social and economic institutions and to cultural and visual representations of the nation and its people.

 

Section WW | Monday-Thursday 1:30 - 5:08 PM | ONLINE | Professor Craig Daigle

Spring 2022 Undergraduate Courses

HIST 21300 – The Historian’s Craft

 

Designed to introduce history as an academic discipline. It offers students an intensive introduction to research skills and the principles and methods of historical analysis. Helps students enhance their critical reading and writing skills while increasing their understanding of the nature of historical inquiry.

 

  • Tues & Thurs 5 – 6:15 PM | HYBRID, Tues: ONLINE, Thurs: IN PERSON | Craig Daigle

 

Research Colloquium

 

This intensive research workshop on the art and craft of primary source-based research projects offers students the opportunity to work on a substantial research project with the guidance of an instructor and the support and feedback of a cohort of fellow researchers. We welcome students who are working on a thesis prospectus, a thesis (MA or Honors), or a research project in History. Students will hone their research and writing skills as well as their ability to critique and engage with work within and beyond their own discipline.

 

Please contact Professor Shirane to discuss your project and admission into the workshop: sshi%72an%65@ccny.cuny.edu " rel="nofollow"> sshirane@ccny.cuny.edu

 

    • Mondays 4:50 – 6:50 PM | IN PERSON | Seiji Shirane

 

HIST 30300 – Research Colloquium (HONORS)

 

HIST 31330 – Research Colloquium

 

EUROPE

HIST 20600 - Modern Europe

           

An overview of the social, economic, political, and intellectual developments in Europe from the Enlightenment to the present, and an introduction to the study of history. Topics include the problems of revolution, industrialization and the transformation of rural societies, the emergence of liberalism and the challenges it has faced in the 20th century.

 

  • Section E
    • Mon & Wed 2 – 3:15 PM | IN PERSON | James Lewis
  • Section M
    • Tues & Thurs 11 – 12:15 PM | IN PERSON | Barbara Syrrakos

 

HIST 23900 - 20th Century Europe through Film

 

An overview of twentieth-century European history that pairs classic films with iconic texts.

 

  • Section M
    • Tues & Thurs 11 – 12:15 PM | HYBRID | Clifford Rosenberg

 

HIST 31691 – Europe: 1945 to the Present

 

Covers the history of Europe from 1945 to the present. Readings highlight the post-World War II recovery; the politics of the memory of the war; the emergence of Cold War Europe; the process of decolonization; the political, social and cultural crises of the 1970s-1980s; the collapse of Communism in 1989-91; and the birth pangs and current crises of the European Union. Special attention will be paid to the case of divided and then re-unified Germany, which became, with the fall of the wall, the key symbol of Communism’s collapse and of European re-integration.

 

  • Tues & Thurs 2 – 3:15 PM | IN PERSON | Andreas Killen

 

HIST 31692 – The Era of Great War

 

Examines the historical era surrounding the global conflagration of 1914-1918. Explores social, political, and economic ideologies, the consequences of imperialism and its partial collapse, artistic reflection and vanguard movements, and the new post-war world order. Uncommon violence, mass movements, radical transformation, and an inconclusive peace emerged from countless small acts.

 

  • Tues & Thurs 9:30 – 10:45 AM | IN PERSON | Barbara Syrrakos

 

HIST 32850 – The French Revolution


A thorough introduction to the French Revolution - one of the defining events of modern times, and the crucible in which key elements of modern politics were forged or redefined: universal manhood suffrage, human rights, civil equality, direct democracy, ideological dictatorship, nationalism, women’s liberation, and revolution itself.

 

  • Tues & Thurs 3:30 – 4:45 PM | IN PERSON | Clifford Rosenberg

 

HIST 31981 – Women and the Holocaust (Cross-Listed with INTL 31981 & JWST 31917)

 

This course explores topics related to women’s experiences during the Holocaust from an interdisciplinary approach. Through the study of primary sources, online archives, literary texts, and artistic representations, students will gain a multifaceted perspective of this topic. This course aims to present the diverse experiences of women’s lives in the ghettos, concentration camps, death camps, in hiding, and in resistance. Students will gain a broader understanding of the Holocaust and mass killings of by learning about the first-hand experiences of Jewish, Roma-Sinti, and other “undesirable” women. The aim of this course is to address deeper questions of how the Third Reich, the war, and the Holocaust affected the lives of women differently from the lives of men.

 

  • Tues & Thurs 2 – 3:15 PM | IN PERSON | STAFF TBA

 

HIST 31223 – Women in Antiquity

 

The growth of the socialist movement in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and its main ideological expressions: utopian, Marxist, revisionist, syndicalist. The relations between ideology and concrete historical circumstances; trade unionism; revolution; working class growth and change; Bolshevism; national liberation.

 

  • Mon & Wed 3:30 – 4:45 PM | HYBRID | TBA

 

HIST 35700 – History of Socialism

 

The growth of the socialist movement in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and its main ideological expressions: utopian, Marxist, revisionist, syndicalist. The relations between ideology and concrete historical circumstances; trade unionism; revolution; working class growth and change; Bolshevism; national liberation.

 

  • Mon & Wed 5 – 6:15 PM | IN PERSON | James Lewis

 

ASIA, AFRICA, & THE MIDDLE EAST

HIST 21902 – Ancient Africa

 

Surveys the diversity of ancient African cultures from the earliest humans through the last millennia B.C.E. The course includes famous African civilizations like Nubia and Egypt, along with many other African societies. Traces how technological innovation, environmental management, and cross-cultural interactions shaped particular cultures and how historians narrate this history.

 

  • Tues & Thurs 2 – 3:15 PM | IN PERSON | Yaari Felber-Seligman

 

HIST 23800 – The Middle East in Global History 

 

  • Mon & Wed 12:30 – 1:45 PM | IN PERSON | Lale Can

 

HIST 32530 – Japanese-Chinese Relations

 

Studying the past two hundred years of relations between China and Japan is integral to understanding present and future developments in East Asia. This course complements existing courses offered by Seiji Shirane (Traditional Japan; Modern Japan; War in Modern East Asia; The Japanese Empire in the 20th-Century) and Danian Hu (Traditional China; Modern China; Twentieth-Century China). Yet while these other courses briefly touch on issues related to Sino-Japanese relations, this course is the only one to focus exclusively on relations between China and Japan over the longue duree. This is a combined course.

 

  • Mon & Wed 2 – 3:15 PM | IN PERSON | Seiji Shirane

 

HIST 31745 – The 1971 War and the Making of Bangladesh

 

The war of 1971 in the Indian sub-continent was significant geopolitically because it led to the creation of Bangladesh. In so doing, it once again partitioned the subcontinent, altered the balance of power between India and Pakistan, and ended systematic oppression in Bangladesh. The course explores international events and the Cold War calculations that, first, led to the conflict, and second, resulted in the breakup of Pakistan and the liberation of Bangladesh. The course will use visuals, publicly available primary and secondary sources, and recently published scholarship.

 

  • Mon & Wed 12:30 – 1:45 PM | HYBRID, Mon: IN PERSON, Wed: ONLINE | Ravi Kalia

 

HIST 31685 – LGBTQ World History

           

This course focuses on the history, contributions, and experiences of gender and sexually-diverse individuals throughout world history, with particular emphasis on nonwestern cultures. It broadly explores changes and debates within the field of history as a whole and the stakes of centering historical analysis on individuals often overlooked or erased by mainstream history writing. The course will balance big-picture discussions with case studies drawn from the instructor’s geographic expertise. These will include examples of precolonial LGBTQ history, how nonwestern cultures conceptualized gender and sexual diversity, the fraught imperial and colonial periods, and contemporary historians’ efforts to diversify curriculums and public knowledge. Students will research a related topic of their choice and develop a final project that can take the form of a research proposal, a teaching unit, or a presentation for the public (such as a film proposal, informative website, podcast series, etc.)

 

  • Tues & Thurs 5 – 6:15 PM | IN PERSON | Yaari Felber-Seligman

 

HIST 47100 – Pakistan: Religion, Military, and the State

 

This course will explore the complex ties between religion, politics, and military, while tracing the circumstances of the creation of Pakistan in 1947 out of British India. Central themes include: How was Pakistan created? How did the military usurp political power. Notwithstanding a sizeable middle class, why does religion play such an important role in Pakistan, and what ties does religion have with the military? Finally the central issue of Indo-Pakistan rivalry.

 

  • Mon & Wed 3:30 – 4:45 PM | HYBRID, Mon: IN PERSON, Wed: ONLINE | Ravi Kalia

 

THE AMERICAS

HIST 24000 - The United States: From Its Origins to 1877

           

The major theological and social conflicts of 17th century English colonies; the political and ideological process that defined an American identity; the social and economic forces that shaped the early republic; the nature of the civil war.

 

  • Section B
    • Mon & Wed 9:30 – 10:45 AM | IN PERSON | Alexander Gambaccini
  • Section C
    • Mon & Wed 11 – 12:15 PM | IN PERSON | Alexander Gambaccini

 

HIST 24100 - The United States: Since 1865

 

Examines the social conflicts that accompanied the transformation of the United States from an agrarian republic and slave society to one of the most powerful industrial nations in the world. Particular attention will be paid to the building of new social and economic institutions and to cultural and visual representations of the nation and its people.

 

  • Section F
    • Mon & Wed 3:30 – 4:45 PM | IN PERSON | John Gillooly
  • Section G
    • Mon & Wed 5 – 6:15 PM | ONLINE | Matthew Cotter
  • Section R
    • Tues & Thurs 3:30 – 4:45 PM | HYBRID, Tues: ONLINE, Thurs: NAC 1/201 | Craig Daigle

 

HIST 31146 – Affluence and Its Discontents

 

This course explores the rise to dominance of a consumer culture in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and then goes on to trace the politics of mass consumption in the period since the 1930s.

 

  • Mon & Weds 9:30 – 10:45 AM | IN PERSON | John Gillooly

 

HIST 32200 – The Era of American Revolution


This course details the causes, events, and consequences of one of the first and most important revolutionary movements of the Enlightenment. Particular attention is devoted to the social and political causes of the uprising, as well as its cultural meaning for the different participants in the American scene.

 

  • Tues & Thurs 11 – 12:15 PM | IN PERSON | John Blanton

 

HIST 31208 – The United States Since Watergate

 

This course will examine the main trends of the last three decades of the 20th century and their interconnections. Among these are: The Watergate crisis and increasing cynicism about government and politics; economic decline and stagflation in the seventies; the rise of the new conservativism and the transformation of the Republican and Democratic Parties,  the course of the Cold War and its ending; the return to free-market capitalism at home (Reagan Revolution) and abroad (globalization), accompanied by the upsurge in immigration; growing economic inequality and rates of imprisonment; the aftermath of the sexual revolution and the restructuring of gender and family relations; the rise of multiculturalism, and the ensuing culture wars.

 

  • Mon & Wed 12:30 – 1:45 PM | IN PERSON | John Gillooly

 

HIST 36300 African-American History to Emancipation

 

The post-slavery experience of African-Americans: the creation and destruction of a black peasantry, the growth of a black working class, and the resulting change in black politics and culture.

 

  • Mon & Wed 5 – 6:15 PM | IN PERSON | Laurie Woodard

 

HIST 31688 – An Indigenous History of the United States

 

An introduction to Native American history from pre-contact to the present, this course argues you can’t understand United States history without indigenous peoples. It focuses on the interrelated histories of Native Americans, African Americans, and the U.S. by indigenizing major American historical developments and addressing current issues in Indian Country.

 

  • Mon & Wed 11 – 12:15 PM | IN PERSON | Alexandra Stern

 

Spring 2022 Graduate Courses

HIST B8958 – WWII and the Remaking of South Asia


World War II fundamentally altered South Asia: After occupying Manchuria in 1931, Imperial Japan controlled Burma (Myanmar, today) by 1942, thus threatening British India. The Indian army became the largest volunteer force in the War consisting of 2.5 million men who fought for the Allied powers in multiple theaters, including Europe, as well as defending eastern India against encroaching Japan. The course explores how the War, which had been conducted on the moral ground of defending "the right of self-determination," contributed to Indian independence, how three new nations emerged out of British India, and how South Asia, with India and Pakistan as nuclear powers, became a vital center for world order and peace.

 

Wednesdays 4:50 - 6:50 PM | HYBRID | Spring 2022 | Professor Ravi Kalia

 

HIST B2321 – Research Colloquium

 

This intensive research workshop on the art and craft of primary source-based research projects offers students the opportunity to work on a substantial research project with the guidance of an instructor and the support and feedback of a cohort of fellow researchers. We welcome students who are working on a thesis prospectus, a thesis (MA or Honors), or a research project in History. Students will hone their research and writing skills as well as their ability to critique and engage with work within and beyond their own discipline.

Please contact Professor Shirane to discuss your project and admission into the workshop:  sshirane@ccny.cuny.edu

 

Mondays 4:50 - 6:50 PM | IN PERSON | Spring 2022 | Professor Seiji Shirane

 

HIST B8016 – Middle East and the World

 

This course will focus on migration to and from the Middle East and North Africa in the 19th and 20th century and the politics of mobility regulation, identity, and citizenship. Topics will include the massive 19th-century influx of Muslim refugees from Russian and the Balkans to Ottoman lands; forced population transfer, including the Armenian genocide and Turkish and Greek "population exchange" of 1923; settler colonialism; Arab migration to the Americas; and post-colonial Muslim migrations to Europe.

 

Thursdays 7:00 – 9:00 PM | IN PERSON | Spring 2022 | Professor Lale Can

 

HIST B3750 – Madness and Civilization

 

Examines the social, cultural, and institutional aspects of the history of madness in modern Europe and America. Topics include the institutional and therapeutic reforms of the revolutionary era; the rise of theories of degeneration, hysteria and neurasthenia; psychoanalysis; war neurosis and military psychiatry; psychiatry under the Nazis; psychiatry and the legacy of imperialism; the anti-psychiatry movement; and contemporary bio-psychiatry.

 

Thursdays 4:50 - 6:50 PM | IN PERSON | Spring 2022 | Professor Andreas Killen

 

HIST B0402 – The New Nation, Slave and Free, 1783 to 1840

 

Republicanism and the democratization of politics, industrialization of an American working class, social reform and the making of the middle class, westward expansion and the removal of the Native Americans, sectional conflict and slave culture.

 

Tuesdays 7 – 9 PM | ONLINE | Spring 2022 | Professor John Blanton

 

HIST B8957 – Histories of American Violence

 

What is the place of violence in American history, and in what ways do the stories Americans tell about themselves celebrate or erase violent action? This course critically examines the presence, meaning, and significance of violence on American soil from the colonial period to the present, drawing on an emerging historical literature using violence as a productive framework for analysis. Course readings and subject matter will intersect with histories of race, gender, imperialism, memory, and trauma.

 

Wednesdays 7 - 9 PM | ONLINE | Spring 2022 | Professor Alex Stern

Spring 2022 USSO & WCIV

USSO 10100 - Development of the U.S. and Its People

 

Analysis of how a powerful nation-state evolved from a tiny offshoot of European colonial expansion. Elucidates major forces that have shaped the modern world: religion, land policies, technology, industrial capitalism, democracy, nationalism, socialism, racism, sexism, and imperialism.

 

  • Section B
    • Mon & Wed 9:30 – 10:45 AM | IN PERSON, NAC 6/122 | Rory Duffy
  • Section B2
    • Mon & Wed 9:30 – 10:45 AM | IN PERSON, NAC 6/327 | Kareen Williams
  • Section C
    • Mon & Wed 11 – 12:15 PM | IN PERSON, NAC 6/313 | Rory Duffy
  • Section E
    • Mon & Wed 2 – 3:15 PM | IN PERSON, NAC 7/306 | Kareen Williams
  • Section E2
    • Mon & Wed 2 – 3:15 PM | IN PERSON | Rory Duffy
  • Section J
    • Mon & Wed 8 – 9:15 PM | ONLINE | Amy Van Natter
  • Section L
    • Tues & Thurs 9:30 – 10:45 AM | IN PERSON, NAC 6/106 | Aaron Weinstein
  • Section L2
    • Tues & Thurs 9:30 – 10:45 AM | IN PERSON, NAC 6/327 | Harold Forsythe
  • Section L3
    • Tues & Thurs 9:30 – 10:45 AM | IN PERSON, NAC 7/219 | Harry Stein
  • Section M
    • Tues & Thurs 11 – 12:15 PM | IN PERSON, NAC 6/310 | Aaron Weinstein
  • Section M2
    • Tues & Thurs 11 – 12:15 PM | IN PERSON, NAC 6/106 | Harold Forsythe
  • Section M3
    • Tues & Thurs 11 – 12:15 PM | IN PERSON, NAC 6/328 | Israel Ben-Porat
  • Section P
    • Tues & Thurs 2 – 3:15 PM | IN PERSON, NAC 5/124 | Aaron Weinstein
  • Section P2
    • Tues & Thurs 2 – 3:15 PM | IN PERSON, NAC 7/225 | Harry Stein
  • Section S
    • Tues & Thurs 5 – 6:15 PM | ONLINE | Herbert Toler
  • Section SEK
    • Mon & Wed 12:30 – 1:45 PM | IN PERSON, NAC 6/328 | Kareen Williams
  • Section T
    • Tues & Thurs 6:30 – 7:45 PM | ONLINE | Herbert Toler
  • Section U
    • Tues & Thurs 8 – 9:15 PM | ONLINE | Herbert Toler

WCIV 10100 - Prehistory to 1500 A.D.

           

An examination of the civilizations of Asia, Africa, Europe and the Americas through a comparative study of selected places and themes. The dynamics of hunter/gatherer, pastoral and agrarian societies, urbanization, trade, imperialism, slavery, feudalism, the centralization of the state, religion and secular thought are among the topics discussed.

 

  • Section B
    • Mon & Wed 9:30 – 10:45 AM | ONLINE | James Lepree
  • Section C2
    • Mon & Wed 11 – 12:15 PM | IN PERSON, Comp Goeth CG252 | Johnnie Wilder
  • Section D
    • Mon & Wed 12:30 – 1:45 PM | ONLINE | James Lepree
  • Section F
    • Mon & Wed 11– 12:15 PM | IN PERSON | Johnnie Wilder
  • Section G
    • Mon & Wed 5 – 6:15 PM | IN PERSON, NAC 4/222 | Michael Thompson
  • Section M
    • Tues & Thurs 11 – 12:15 PM | IN PERSON, NAC 5/108 | Richard VanNort
  • Section P3
    • Tues & Thurs 2 – 3:15 PM | IN PERSON, NAC 4/125 | Richard VanNort
  • Section SEK
    • Mon & Wed 12:30 – 1:45 PM | IN PERSON, NAC 5/110 | Johnnie Wilder

 

WCIV 10200 - 1500 A.D. to the Present

 

A study of the major forces that have shaped the modern world of Asia, Africa, Europe and the Americas. Selected themes include the interaction of the Western and non-Western world, the scientific revolution, capitalism, imperialism, industrialization, economic growth and stagnation, revolutions, counter-revolutions, modern political ideologies, the global crisis of the 20th century and emerging global interdependence.

 

  • Section C
    • Mon & Wed 11 – 12:15 PM | IN PERSON, NAC 6/327 | David Harden
  • Section D2
    • Mon & Wed 12:30 – 1:45 PM | ONLINE | Hamideh Sedghi
  • Section F
    • Mon & Wed 3:30 - 4:45 PM | ONLINE | Ravi Kalia
  • Section M
    • Tues & Thurs 11 – 12:15 PM | IN PERSON, NAC 7/305 | Jeremy Randall

Fall 2021 Undergraduate Courses

Click here for the Fall 2021 Undergrad History Course Flyer

HIST 20400 HNR Early-Modern Europe

An overview of European history from the resurgence of urban life and classical
culture during the Renaissance to the trials and tribulations of the
French Revolution..

  • Mon & Wed 11 – 12:15 PM | ONLINE | Julian Gonzalez De Leon Heiblum

HIST 20600 Modern Europe

An overview of the social, economic, political, and intellectual developments in Europe from the Enlightenment to the present, and an introduction to the study of history. Topics include the problems of revolution, industrialization and the transformation of rural societies, the emergence of liberalism and the challenges it has faced in the 20th century.

  • Section E
    • Mon & Wed 2 – 3:15 PM | NAC 5/101 IN PERSON | James Lewis
  • Section G
    • Mon & Wed 5 – 6:15 PM | NAC 6/115 | James Lewis
  • Section M
    • Tues & Thurs 11 – 2:15 | ONLINE | Barbara Syrrakos

 

HIST 21300 The Historians Craft

Designed to introduce history as an academic discipline. It offers students an intensive introduction to research skills and the principles and methods of historical analysis. Helps students enhance their critical reading and writing skills while increasing their understanding of the nature of historical inquiry.

  • Section E
    • Mon & Wed 2 – 3:15 PM | ONLINE |Seiji Shirane
  • Section M
    • Tues & Thurs 11 – 2:15 | ONLINE | Yaari Felber-Seligman

 

HIST 22900 Africa before 1500 (cross-listed with Black Studies 31150)

Course will examine such early civilizations as the Axum, Nubia, Jenne-jeno, Ile-Ife, central African rainforest societies, Swahili towns, and Great Zimbabwe.  Close attention will be paid to how mobility, technological innovation, environmental management, and cross-cultural interaction have shaped African history.

  • Tues & Thurs 2 – 3:15 PM | ONLINE | Yaari Felber-Seligman

 

HIST 23900 20th Century Europe through Film

An overview of twentieth-century European history that pairs classic films with iconic texts.

  • Tues & Thurs 11 – 12:15 PM | ONLINE | Clifford Rosenberg

 

HIST 24000 The United States: From Its Origins to 1877

The major theological and social conflicts of 17th century English colonies; the political and ideological process that defined an American identity; the social and economic forces that shaped the early republic; the nature of the civil war.

  •  
  • Section B
    • Mon & Wed 9:30 – 10:45 AM | ONLINE  | Alexander Gambaccini
  • Section L
    • Tues & Thurs 9:30 – 10:45 AM | HYBRID – Tues: NAC 6/112 Thurs: ONLINE  | Alexander Gambaccini

 

HIST 24100 The United States: Since 1865

Examines the social conflicts that accompanied the transformation of the United States from an agrarian republic and slave society to one of the most powerful industrial nations in the world. Particular attention will be paid to the building of new social and economic institutions and to cultural and visual representations of the nation and its people.

  • Section C
    • Mon & Wed 11 – 12:15 PM | ONLINE  | Matthew Vaz
  • Section M
    • Tues & Thurs 11 – 12:15 PM | NAC 6/113 IN PERSON | John Gillooly

 

HIST 25300 Modern China

Change and continuity in the Chinese tradition across the 19th and 20th centuries. The encounter with the West, social and political disruptions, efforts to industrialize, and especially the evolution and outcome of the Chinese revolution will be stressed.

  • Section F
    • Mon & Wed 3:30 – 4:45 PM | ONLINE | Danian Hu
  • Section G
    • Mon & Wed 5 – 6:15 PM| ONLINE | Danian Hu

 

HIST 28000 Latin America in World History

A historical introduction to the cultures and societies of Latin America and the Caribbean from the Pre-Colombian era to the present and their place in world history.

  • Mon & Weds 12:30 – 1:45 PM | HYBRID – Mon: ONLINE Weds: NAC 6/113 | Matthew Vaz

 

HIST 31133 India after Gandhi

  • Mon & Wed 12:30 – 1:45 PM | ONLINE | Ravi Kalia

 

HIST 31686 Science and Society

This course uses topical issues and recent scientific controversies to introduce students to the history of science. It will be organized around modules. Examples: the first module will take recent manifestations of eugenic thinking to introduce students to the history of the eugenics movement; 2) This module will use the torture scandal to introduce students to the history of bio- and medical ethics; 3) the US’s withdrawal from the Paris climate accord will be the point of departure for a module on environmental history. Practitioners in a range of disciplines (environmental science, psychology, medicine, philosophy) will deliver guest lectures.

  • Tues & Thurs 2 – 3:15 PM | ONLINE | Andreas Killen

 

HIST 31690 The United Kingdom from Decolonization to Brexit

  • Tues & Thurs 9:30 – 10:45 AM | ONLINE | Barbara Syrrakos

 

HIST 32100 Early America

  • Mon & Wed 9:30 – 10:45 AM | ONLINE | Darren Staloff

 

HIST 32400 Civil War and Reconstruction

Analyzes the causes, course, and consequences of the American Civil War. Topics include sectional crisis in an era of antebellum expansion, slavery and emancipation as political and personal realities, and Reconstruction conflicts over the new status of freedpeople in the South and the future of alternative sovereignties in the West.

  • Mon & Wed 3:30 – 4:45 PM | ONLINE | Alexandra Stern

 

HIST 32501 The Gilded Age and Progressive Era

The political, economic, and social phases of the development of the United States from Reconstruction to the First World War.

  • Tues & Thurs 2 – 3:15 PM | NAC 6/113 IN PERSON | John Gillooly

 

HIST 32600 The U.S. from 1914 to 1945

America and World War I, the Roaring Twenties, the Depression and New Deal, Roosevelt's leadership, World War II.

  • Tues & Thurs 5 – 6:15 PM | NAC 6/113 IN PERSON | John Gillooly

 

HIST 33350 Twentieth-Century China (combined section with ASIA 31112)

  • Mon & Wed 11 – 12:15 PM | ONLINE | Danian Hu

 

HIST 34900 The Third Reich

Hitler, Nazism and Nazi Germany. Topics include: social, economic, and political preconditions to the Nazi takeover; anti-semitism; cultural and artistic policies of Nazi Germany; the churches; the film industry; varieties of resistance; concentration camps; the conquest of Europe; mass murder; fall of the Third Reich. (W)

  • Tues & Thurs 3:30 – 4:45 PM | ONLINE | Andreas Killen

 

HIST 36300 African-American History to Emancipation (cross-listed with Black Studies 31173)

During the Fall 2021 semester, African American History to Emancipation, AKA: History and Memory in the Early Modern Atlantic World, will operate as a HyFlex class. HyFlex means we will be using technology so that students who wish to attend class in person and students who wish to attend class remotely will be able to do so. We will meet in person or remotely synchronously (at the assigned class meeting time) and you will be able to access course materials online asynchronously (at your convenience). Everyone will be able to participate fully and safely.

We will explore the history, memory, and representation of enslavement and abolition in the United States. The key questions we are posing are: how do we recover the unrecoverable and how do we remember the “unrememberable?” We will consider the history of enslavement in the Atlantic World, its legacies in the United States, the gaps in our knowledge, the global trauma of Atlantic World Slavery, and contemporary and contemporaneous representations. Key themes include: the formation of the Atlantic World, enslavement, the transatlantic slave trade, slavery in the United States, the formation of African American cultures, the emergence of race and racism, resistance and rebellion, abolition, emancipation, and the meaning of freedom.

  • Mon & Wed 5 – 6:15 PM | NAC 4/209 HYBRID | Laurie Woodard

 

Fall 2021 Graduate Courses

Click here for the Fall 2021 Graduate History Course Flyer

HIST B0000 Historical Methods and Historiography

Focus on the methods that have shaped the conceptualization and writing of professional history over the past few decades. Methods studied may include those of Marxists, the French Annales school, social-scientific history, gender history, anthropological history, historical sociology, the history of material culture and consumption, the history of nationalism and cosmopolitanism, global and transnational history, environmental history. Area readings will vary with instructor. (Required for all M.A. students).

Tuesdays 7-9 PM | ONLINE | Fall 2021 | Professor Clifford Rosenberg

 

HIST B0016 Pacific War

This course will explore significant milestones and issues of both U.S. and Japanese societies during the course of the Pacific War. Our focus will be on the human experience and changes that came to both societies as well as contemporary issues regarding the contested memory and responsibility of many aspects of the war.

Mondays 4:50-6:50 PM | ONLINE | Fall 2021 | Professor Seiji Shirane

 

HIST B8020 20th Century US Social Justice Movements: ‘60s Going on ‘70s***

This seminar invites students to delve into the intersecting social movements of the 1960s and 1970s. We will explore narratives of civil rights, women’s rights, gay rights, black power and the student and anti-war movements, among others, focusing on the ways in which the participants, agendas, goals, and strategies inspired, challenged, and influenced one another and the ways in which scholars and writers, both within and beyond the academy, have sought to contain, or at least manage, this vibrant yet unwieldy historical movement.

Thursdays 7-9 PM | NAC 5/142 | Fall 2021 | Professor Laurie Woodard

*** HIST B8020 will meet on campus but will be available remotely as well.

 

HIST B8953 New Directions in World History

This course emphasizes new directions and previously neglected topics in field of World History based on the instructor’s expertise. May include, but not limited to, histories of ancient non-western worlds, nomadic and sea-faring peoples, indigenous cultures, gender, LGBTQ individuals, everyday life, popular culture, and the so-called “Big History” that emphasizes broader, nonhuman planetary/environmental history as part of the curriculum. Class readings and assignments will emphasize new directions in research, practice, and pedagogy.

Thursdays 4:50-6:50 PM | ONLINE | Fall 2021 | Professor Yaari Felber-Seligman

 

HIST B9060 Cold War International History

Examines the history of the Cold War from the perspective of non-Western states, such as East Germany, North Korea, China, Cuba, Egypt, Angola and other African states. Explores the causes and interpretations of the origins, intensification, prolongation, and the end of the Cold War, and weighs factors such as personality, ideology, economics, culture, and geopolitics in the cold war.

Wednesdays 7-9 PM | ONLINE | Fall 2021 | Professor Craig Daigle

 

HIST B0807 Arab-Israeli Conflict 

T/TH 3:30-4:45 PM | HYBRID | Professor Craig Daigle

 

 

Fall 2021 USSO & WCIV Courses

Click here for the Fall 2021 USSO & WCIV Course Flyer

USSO 10100 Development of the U.S. and Its People

Analysis of how a powerful nation-state evolved from a tiny offshoot of European colonial expansion. Elucidates major forces that have shaped the modern world: religion, land policies, technology, industrial capitalism, democracy, nationalism, socialism, racism, sexism, and imperialism.

**This discussion section will meet once a week either online (indicated by an “O”) or in-person (indicated by an “H” for hybrid.) This weekly section will be accompanied by a large online weekly lecture given by Professor Darren Staloff. The lecture can be watched live on Mondays 12:30-1:45 p.m. or asynchronously after that time. Students will be responsible for watching the weekly lecture and participating in one weekly discussion section at the specific day/time of the section in which they are enrolled.
 

  • Section 1E
    • Mon 2 – 3:15 PM | HYBRID Baskerville 106 | Kareen Williams
  • Section 1E2
    • Mon 2 – 3:15 PM | ONLINE | Rory Duffy
  • Section 1F
    • Mon 3:30 – 4:45 PM | HYBRID – Mon: NAC 4/220C | Kareen Williams
  • Section 1F2
    • Mon 3:30 – 4:45 PM | ONLINE | Rory Duffy
  • Section 1H
    • Mon 6:30 ­ – 7:45 PM | ONLINE | Herbert Toler
  • Section 1J
    • Mon 8 – 9:15 PM | ONLINE | Amy Van Natter
  • Section 2L
    • Tues 9:30 – 10:45 AM | ONLINE | David Harden
  • Section 2M2
    • Tues 11 – 12:15 PM | HYBRID – Tues: NAC 4/220C | Israel Ben-Porat
  • Section 2M3
    • Tues 11 – 12:15 PM | HYBRID – Tues: Shepard 22 | Harry Stein
  • Section 2P3
    • Tues 2 – 3:15 PM | HYBRID – Tues: NAC 4/220C | Harry Stein
  • Section 3B
    • Wed 9:30 – 10:45 AM | HYBRID – Wed: Shepard 22 | Kareen Williams
  • Section 3C
    • Wed 11 – 12:15 AM | HYBRID – Wed: Baskerville 106 | Kareen Williams
  • Section 3C2
    • Wed 11 – 12:15 PM | ONLINE | Rory Duffy
  • Section 3D
    • Wed 12:30 – 1:45 PM | ONLINE | Rory Duffy
  • Section 3E
    • Wed 2 – 3:15 PM | HYBRID – Wed: Baskerville 106 | Kareen Williams
  • Section 3F
    • Wed 3:30 – 4:45 PM | ONLINE | Rory Duffy
  • Section 3F2
    • Wed 3:30 – 4:45 AM | HYBRID – Wed: Shepard 22 | Kareen Williams
  • Section 3G
    • Wed 5 – 6:15 PM | ONLINE | Rory Duffy
  • Section 3H
    • Wed 6:30 – 7:45 PM | ONLINE | Herbert Toler
  • Section 3J
    • Wed 8 – 9:15 PM | ONLINE | Amy Van Natter
  • Section 4L
    • Thurs 9:30 – 10:45 AM | ONLINE | David Harden
  • Section 4M2
    • Thurs 11 – 12:15 PM | HYBRID – Thurs: NAC 4/220C | Israel Ben-Porat
  • Section 4M3
    • Thurs 11 – 12:15 PM | HYBRID – Thurs: Shepard 22 | Harry Stein
  • Section 4P3
    • Thurs 2 – 3:15 PM | HYBRID – Thurs: NAC 4/220C | Harry Stein
  • Section 4S
    •   Thurs 5 – 6:15 AM | ONLINE | Herbert Toler
  • Section 4T
    •   Thurs 6:30 – 7:45 AM | ONLINE | Herbert Toler

 

WCIV 10100 Prehistory to 1500 A.D.

An examination of the civilizations of Asia, Africa, Europe and the Americas through a comparative study of selected places and themes. The dynamics of hunter/gatherer, pastoral and agrarian societies, urbanization, trade, imperialism, slavery, feudalism, the centralization of the state, religion and secular thought are among the topics discussed.

  • Section B
    • Mon & Wed 9:30 – 10:45 AM | HYBRID – Mon: ONLINE, Wed: NAC 5/111 | Johnnie Wilder
  • Section D
    • Mon & Wed 12:30 – 1:45 PM | HYBRID – Mon: ONLINE, Wed: NAC 5/111 | Johnnie Wilder
  • Section E
    • Mon & Wed 2 – 3:15 PM | ONLINE | James Lepree
  • Section F
    • Mon & Wed 3:30 – 4:45 PM | ONLINE | James Lepree
  • Section G
    • Mon & Wed 5 – 6:15 PM | ONLINE | Michael Thompson
  • Section M
    • Tues & Thurs 11 – 12:15 PM | ONLINE | Richard VanNort
  • Section P
    • Tues & Thurs 2 – 3:15 PM | ONLINE | Richard VanNort
  • Section R3
    • Tues & Thurs 3:30 – 4:45 PM | ONLINE | Richard VanNort
  • Section SEK
    • Mon & Wed 3:30 – 4:45 PM | HYBRID – Mon: ONLINE, Wed: NAC 5/110 | Johnnie Wilder

 

WCIV 10200 1500 A.D. to the Present

A study of the major forces that have shaped the modern world of Asia, Africa, Europe and the Americas. Selected themes include the interaction of the Western and non-Western world, the scientific revolution, capitalism, imperialism, industrialization, economic growth and stagnation, revolutions, counter-revolutions, modern political ideologies, the global crisis of the 20th century and emerging global interdependence.

  • Section F
    • Mon & Wed 3:30 – 4:45 PM | ONLINE | Hamideh Sedghi
  • Section G
    • Mon & Wed 5 – 6:15 PM | ONLINE | Ravi Kalia
  • Section L
    • Tues & Thurs 9:30 – 10:45 PM | IN PERSON Baskerville 106 | Aaron Weinstein
  • Section M
    • Tues & Thurs 11 – 12:15 PM | ONLINE | Spencer Bastedo
  • Section M2
    • Tues & Thurs 11 – 12:15 PM | IN PERSON Baskerville 106 | Aaron Weinstein
  • Section P2
    • Tues & Thurs 2 – 3:15 PM | IN PERSON Baskerville 106 | Aaron Weinstein

Summer 2021 Graduate & Undergraduate History Courses

Graduate Courses

HIST B8956 The Birth of the Modern European State: 1400-1815

What is a sovereign state, and when did it arise in European history? How have major scholars accounted for its origins and nature? And had history borne out their hypotheses? TO answer these questions this course engages landmark readings about the “state” by legendary social scientists from Weber to Foucault and case studies of its genesis by prominent historians of Europe and its colonial empires, from 1400-1815.

Mon,Tues,Weds,Thurs 6-8:35 PM | 06/07/2021 - 07/01/2021 | ONLINE | Barbara Naddeo

 

HIST B1615 France-Francophone Africa 

This course examines the relationship between France and countries of the former French overseas empire in Africa from the occupation of Algeria in 1830 to political independence, to issues of post-colonial dependency in Africa and the emergence of multicultural France today.

Mon,Tues,Weds,Thurs 6-8:35 PM | 07/06/2021 - 08/02/2021 | ONLINE | James Lewis

 

Undergraduate Courses

HIST 31197 Afghan Wats in Films

The Afghan wars—from the Soviet occupation of the 1980s to the American invasion of 2001 and beyond-- present a good example of contemporary conflicts, often described as “complex political emergencies” (CPEs). These are the offshoots of diverse factors related to ethno-national, ethno-geographic, ethno- economic, ethno-religious and ethno-sectarian phenomena. To grasp these conflicts, one needs to examine Afghanistan’s history, culture, and linguistic dynamics, as well as its socio-economic structure, religio- tribal ideologies, and geo-strategic and geo-political stereotypes.

A comprehensive record of the impact on the country’s human capital from the 1980s to the present will be examined. The course will be conducted through reference readings (no textbook!), films, documentaries, videos, and digital and print media. And multiple on-line primary sources.

The course has no prerequisites and is open to all interested students.

Mon,Tues,Weds,Thurs 6-8:35 PM | 06/07/2021 - 07/01/2021 | ONLINE | Ravi Kalia

 

HIST 31888 British Empire

Using rare documents and eyewitness accounts the British Museum has chronicled the once mighty British Empire and how it functioned.  There were both positive and negative consequences of the Empire: it brought education, technology, law, and democracy to the four corners of the globe. It also brought prejudice, discrimination, cultural bigotry, and racism. The course examines the complexities, contradictions, and legacies of empire.

No midterm or final.  One short term paper & active class discussion based on the text & selected readings.

GRADE: Will be calculated based on class discussion, interpretive arguments of your readings, and a term paper.

Mon,Tues,Weds,Thurs 2:30-5:50 PM | 06/07/2021 - 07/01/2021 | ONLINE | Ravi Kalia

 

HIST 20600 Modern Europe

An overview of the social, economic, political, and intellectual developments in Europe from the Enlightenment to the present, and an introduction to the study of history. Topics include the problems of revolution, industrialization and the transformation of rural societies, the emergence of liberalism, and the challenges it has faced in the 20th century.

Mon,Tues,Weds,Thurs 2:30-5:50 PM | 07/06/2021 - 08/02/2021 | ONLINE | James Lewis

 

HIST 30102 Medieval Europe

Mon,Tues,Weds,Thurs 2:30-5:50 PM | 07/06/2021 - 08/02/2021 | ONLINE | James Lepree 

 

HIST 34450 The Modern Middle East

Mon,Tues,Weds,Thurs 11:30-2:05 PM | 06/07/2021 - 07/01/2021 | ONLINE | Spencer Bastedo

Summer 2021 USSO & WCIV Courses

USSO 10100 1LL The Development of the U.S. and its People

Analysis of how a powerful nation-state evolved from a tiny offshoot of European colonial expansion. Elucidates major forces that have shaped the modern world: religion, land policies, technology, industrial capitalism, democracy, nationalism, socialism, racism, sexism, and imperialism.

Mon,Tues,Weds,Thurs 11:30 AM - 2:05 PM | 06/07/2021 - 07/01/2021 | ONLINE | Aaron Weinstein

 

USSO 10100 2LL The Development of the U.S. and its People

Analysis of how a powerful nation-state evolved from a tiny offshoot of European colonial expansion. Elucidates major forces that have shaped the modern world: religion, land policies, technology, industrial capitalism, democracy, nationalism, socialism, racism, sexism, and imperialism.

Mon,Tues,Weds,Thurs 11:30 AM - 2:05 PM | 07/06/2021 - 08/02/2021 | ONLINE | Aaron Weinstein


WCIV Courses

WCIV 10100 1LL Prehistory to 1500 A.D.

An examination of the civilizations of Asia, Africa, Europe and the Americas through a comparative study of selected places and themes. The dynamics of hunter/gatherer, pastoral and agrarian societies, urbanization, trade, imperialism, slavery, feudalism, the centralization of the state, religion and secular thought are among the topics discussed.

TIME TBA | 06/07/2021 - 07/01/2021 | ONLINE | Johnnie Wilder

 

WCIV 10100 1MM Prehistory to 1500 A.D.

An examination of the civilizations of Asia, Africa, Europe and the Americas through a comparative study of selected places and themes. The dynamics of hunter/gatherer, pastoral and agrarian societies, urbanization, trade, imperialism, slavery, feudalism, the centralization of the state, religion and secular thought are among the topics discussed.

Mon,Tues,Weds,Thurs 2:30 - 3:30 PM | 06/07/2021 - 07/01/2021 | ONLINE | Staff

 

WCIV 10100 2 LL Prehistory to 1500 A.D.

An examination of the civilizations of Asia, Africa, Europe and the Americas through a comparative study of selected places and themes. The dynamics of hunter/gatherer, pastoral and agrarian societies, urbanization, trade, imperialism, slavery, feudalism, the centralization of the state, religion and secular thought are among the topics discussed.

Mon,Tues,Weds,Thurs 11:30 AM - 2:05 PM | 07/06/2021 - 08/02/2021 | ONLINE | Michael Thompson 

Spring 2021 Undergraduate Courses

HISTORICAL METHODS

 

21300-The Historian’s Craft (Class-33209/Section-S)

This course introduces students to the study of history. It offers an intensive introduction to historical writing and research, and to the principles and methods of historical analysis. Students will learn about the historical craft as well as gain critical skills that are useful in any discipline or endeavor where research and writing are essential. This course is required for all history majors.

T/TH  5:00pm-6:15pm                                                                                   Alexandra Stern

 

30300-Research Colloquium (HONORS) (Class-33223/Section-3FG)

This course is an intensive workshop on the art and craft of writing primary source-based research papers of History and related disciplines. To enroll in the course, you need the permission from the instructor. You should have a project underway before the start of the semester in order to increase your chances of completing a polished paper by the end of the semester.

W  7:00pm-9:00pm                                                                                        Barbara Naddeo

 

31330-Research Colloquium (Class-33222/Section-3HJ)

This course is an intensive workshop on the art and craft of writing primary source-based research papers of History and related disciplines. To enroll in the course, you need the permission from the instructor. You should have a project underway before the start of the semester in order to increase your chances of completing a polished paper by the end of the semester.

W  7:00pm-9:00pm                                                                                        Barbara Naddeo

 

 

EUROPE

 

20200-The Ancient World: Rome (Class-48821/Section-F)

Surveys the history of classical antiquity from the Hellenistic Age to the fall of the Western Empire.

M/W  3:30pm-4:45pm                                                                                 Georgios Spiliotopoulos

                                                                                   

20400-Early-Modern Europe (Class-48803/Section-B)

An overview of European history from the resurgence of urban life and classical culture during the Renaissance to the trials and tribulations of the French Revolution.

M/W  9:30am-10:45am                                                                               Barbara Naddeo

 

20600-Modern Europe (Class-33194/Section-E)

An overview of the social, economic, political, and intellectual developments in Europe from the Enlightenment to the present, and an introduction to the study of history. Topics include the problems of revolution, industrialization and the transformation of rural societies, the emergence of liberalism and the challenges it has faced in the twentieth century.

M/W  2:00pm-3:15pm                                                                                    James Lewis

 

20600-Modern Europe (Class-33217/Section-M)

An overview of the social, economic, political, and intellectual developments in Europe from the Enlightenment to the present, and an introduction to the study of history. Topics include the problems of revolution, industrialization and the transformation of rural societies, the emergence of liberalism and the challenges it has faced in the twentieth century.

T/TH  11:00am-12:15pm                                                                               Barbara Syrrakos

 

 HIST 31670- European Legal History (Class-151657/Section-D)

This course provides an overview of the development of law and legal institutions on the European continent and the role law played in the formation of territorial states and world empires as well as the governance of their diverse societies at the cusp of modernity. Topics include the role of law in the construction of polities, from city-states to sovereign nations and territorial empires, and in the policing of culture and identity--from religious beliefs to gender and sexuality. The course will also examine the use of the courts by diverse social groups to assert and codify the rights of modern life, from property rights to the privileges of political citizenship.

M/W  12:30pm-1:45pm                                                                                  Barbara Naddeo

 

32250-European Union (Class-48822/Section-L)

The European Union is the largest democratically conceived confederation of sovereign states in human history, directly affecting a half a billion persons. How has this come to pass, and how does it fare? We will examine earlier examples of union, analyze the nature and origins of the EU in the midst of the Cold War, and explore its mechanics and policies, including immigration, culture, the economy, and Brexit. Texts are historical, theoretical , first-person accounts, and archival, including two comprehensive web-based history and policy archives and a foundational myth.  Who was Europa, after all?

T/TH  9:30am-10:45am                                                                                 Barbara Syrrakos

 

32850 – The French Revolution (Class-48810/Section-M)

A thorough introduction to the French Revolution – one of the defining events of modern times, and the crucible in which key elements of modern politics were forged or redefined: universal manhood suffrage, human rights, civil equality, direct democracy, ideological dictatorship, nationalism, women’s liberation, and revolution itself.

T/TH  11:00am-12:15pm                                                                               Clifford Rosenberg

 

32900-Twentieth Century Europe (Class-48814/Section-H)

What’s Freud got to do with feminism? Or Horkheimer with Hitler, Christian Democracy with the European Union, or colonial independence movements in Africa and Asia with radical student politics in Paris and Prague? You’ll find the answers to these and other questions in this course, which covers Europe during the First World War, the Russian Revolution, the rise of Fascism and Nazism, the Second World War, and their aftermath. You’ll read what the men and women who shaped the 20th century had to say about it. And you’ll learn what it means to evaluate their ideas and actions from a variety of perspectives.

M/W  6:30pm-7:45pm                                                                                    James Lewis

 

35700-History of Socialism (Class-33196/Section-G)

The growth of the socialist movement in the 19th and 20th centuries and its main ideological expressions; utopian, Marxist, revisionist, syndicalist. The relations between ideology and concrete historical circumstances; trade unionism; revolution; working class growth and change; Bolshevism; national liberation.

M/W  5:00pm-6:15pm                                                                                    James Lewis

 

42300-Psychiatry, Madness, and Society (Class-33206/Section-P)

Examines social, cultural, intellectual and institutional aspects of the history of madness in Europe since 1789. The course will begin with the age of the so-called “Great Confinement,” then move on to consider the institutional and therapeutic reforms of the revolutionary and post-revolutionary era; the rise of theories of degeneration, hysteria and neurasthenia in the second half of the 19th century; psychoanalysis and sexology; war neurosis and military psychiatry; psychiatry under the Nazis. It will conclude by looking at the anti-psychiatry movements of the 1980s and 1990s.

T/TH  2:00pm-3:15pm                                                                                   Andreas Killen

 

43000-France and Francophone Africa (Class-48811/Section-P)

We will examine the political, economic, cultural and demographic dialectic between metropolitan France and its former protectorates, territories and departments in various regions of Africa. We will study both the impact of France on these societies and how these former dependencies have transformed mainland France into a multi-ethnic, multi-religious society since the end of the Second World War, often against French popular opinion and preference.

T/TH  2:00pm-3:15pm                                                                                   Clifford Rosenberg

 

THE AMERICAS

 

24000-The United States: From Its Origins to 1877 (Class-33230/Section-C)

The major theological and social conflicts of 17th century English colonies; the political and ideological process that defined an American identity; the social and economic forces that shaped the early Republic; the nature of the regional conflicts that culminated in civil war.

M/W  11:00am-12:15pm                                                                                Alexander Gambaccini

 

24000-The United States: From Its Origins to 1877 (Class-33213/Section-S)

The major theological and social conflicts of 17th century English colonies; the political and ideological process that defined an American identity; the social and economic forces that shaped the early Republic; the nature of the regional conflicts that culminated in civil war.

T/TH  5:00pm-6:15pm                                                                                   Joel Hopkins

 

24100-The United States: Since 1865 (Class-5815/Section-C)

Examines the social and political conflicts that accompanied the transformation of the U.S. from an agrarian republic and slave society to one of the most powerful industries nations in the world. Particular attention will be paid to the building of new social and economic institutions and to cultural and visual representations of the nation its people.                                                                                             Matthew Vaz

M/W 11:00am-12:15 pm                                                                               

 

31688-An Indigenous History of the United States (Class-53293/Section-R)

An introduction to Native American history from pre-contact to the present, this course argues you can’t understand United States history without indigenous people. It focuses on the interrelated histories of Native Americans, African Americans, and the U.S. by indigenizing major American historical developments and addressing current issues in Indian Country.?

T/TH  3:30pm-4:45pm                                                                                   Alexandra Stern

 

32200-The Era of American Revolution (Class-33212/Section-M)

This course details the causes, events, and consequences of one of the first and most important revolutionary movements of the Enlightenment. Particular attention is devoted to the social and political causes of the uprising, as well as its cultural meaning for the different participants in the American scene.

T/TH  11:00am-12:15pm                                                                               Darren Staloff

 

32500-Slavery and Antislavery in the United States (Class-48812/Section-M)

This course will examine how America constructed, opposed, and eventually destroyed the institution of chattel slavery from the beginning of colonization through the American Revolution, the first era of emancipations in the late 18th century, the rise of the Cotton Kingdom, the emergence and progress of radical abolitionism, and the final destruction of slavery during the Civil War and Reconstruction. Special attention will be paid to the ways in which enslaved people of color experienced and resisted enslavement, the political and economic structures that gave birth to and sustained slavery, and the ideals and tactics of antislavery thinkers and activists.

T/TH  11:00am-12:15pm                                                                               John Blanton

 

44900-Power, Race, Culture in NYC (Class-48805/Section-D)                                                               

This course will introduce students to the interdisciplinary study of American culture through an examination of New York City-its history, literature and culture. Students will examine the historical and cultural context of New York as a center of migration and immigration and power, as a cultural capital, and as an arena of racial, ethnic, and religious traditions and conflicts.

M/W  12:30pm-1:45pm                                                                                  Matthew Vaz

 

ASIA

 

25100-Traditional China (Class-48807/Section-R)

The early formation of the Chinese state, the intellectual foundation that has sustained its long history, the shaping of the Confucian way of life, and the cultural sophistication and its decline on the eve of the modern world.

T/TH  3:30pm-4:45pm                                                                                   Danian Hu

 

25100-Traditional China (Class-48808/Section-S)

The early formation of the Chinese state, the intellectual foundation that has sustained its long history, the shaping of the Confucian way of life, and the cultural sophistication and its decline on the eve of the modern world.

T/TH  5:00pm-6:15pm                                                                                   Danian Hu

 

31182-Gandhi and Civil Disobedience (Class-50370/Section-F)

Gandhi's long life was anchored in Truth, and from Truth he devised his forceful civil disobedience (satyagraha) movement. Uniting his countrymen in peaceful protests Gandhi challenged the Raj. The British forces met Gandhi's peaceful soldiers with violence and imprisonment. In this course we will examine India's struggle for freedom, we will learn how Gandhi’s philosophy of nonviolent action overpowered the British government; and we will witness how Gandhi's actions influenced civil rights movements around the world. 

M/W  3:30pm-4:45pm                                                                                    Ravi Kalia

 

46400-Science and Technology in China (Class-48806/Section-M)

A survey of the scientific and technological developments in China from ancient times to the present. The course covers not only the great Chinese inventions and the decline of Chinese science and technology and its consequences, but also more recent achievements and their relation to developments elsewhere in Asia and around the world.

T/TH  11:00am-12:15pm                                                                               Danian Hu

 

MIDDLE EAST

 

31220-Gender and Women in the Middle East (Class-33504/Section-C)

This course examines the history of women and gender from the rise of Islam to the spread of contemporary Islamic political movements. Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which religion shapes women's lives as well as the ways in which women shape religion, women's roles in political and social movements, gendered economic activities, and gender relations.

M/W  11:00am-12:15pm                                                                                Hamideh Sedghi

Spring 2021 Graduate Courses

B0013-The Atlantic World (Class-48815/Section-4RS)

This course examines the local, regional, and global transformations wrought by interactions between the peoples of Europe, the Americas, and Africa from the 15th to 19th centuries. This course problematizes conventional narratives of “discovery,” “colonization,” and “revolution” by placing them in broader transnational and comparative contexts. Central themes will include: the emergence and development of Atlantic capitalism; the expropriation of Indigenous lands and the struggles of Indigenous people to maintain their autonomy; the construction and development of varied gender roles; the African slave trade, varied systems of Atlantic slavery, and the experiences of enslaved and free African and African-descended peoples.

TH  4:50pm-6:50pm                          Online                                                 John Blanton

 

B0621-Third Reich (Class-48817/Section-2RS)

An introduction to the history of National Socialism. Topics will include the crisis of Weimar Germany, the origins, structure, and evolution of the Nazi regime, Hitler, and the Hitler myth, Nazi culture, the Nazi “new order” in Europe, total war, and the implementation; of the final Solution. Special attention will be given to the question of the memory of the Holocaust.

TU  4:50pm-6:50pm                          Online                                                 Andreas Killen

 

B2321-Research Colloquium (Class-33221/Section-3HJ)

This course is an intensive workshop on the art and craft of writing primary source-based research papers of History and related disciplines. To enroll in the course, you need the permission of the instructor. You should have a project underway before the start of the semester in order to increase your chances of completing a polished paper by the end of the semester.

W  7:00pm-9:00pm                            Online                                                 Barbara Naddeo

 

B4120-US Legal History (Class-48818/Section-1HJ)

This course will introduce students to the major problems and interpretations in the field of American legal history. We will examine a number of key constitutional and legal conflicts in the 19th and 20th century United States through theoretical and historiographical interpretations of those conflicts as well as by acquainting ourselves with a variety of primary sources (including cases, trial records, treatises and legal lives). The course seeks to understand the role of law in American life and the social and cultural meaning of the law in American history. How does the law affect people’s lives? How do we locate those effects? To what degree does the law have an existence separate from other large forces that determine relations of power and possibilities for action? Topics will include slave law; the role of law and economic development; the law of husband and wife; race and the Constitution; the emergence of civil rights and civil liberties, legal ethnics, and the problem of regulations, among others.

M  7:00pm-9:00pm                            Online                                                 Anne Kornhauser

 

B8955-British Mercantilism & Colonization of India (Class-53289/Section-1FG)

At the dawn of Mercantilism in England, the British government authorized English merchants operating in India to “wage war” and “use violence” to establish British dominance in India and Asia. By the end of the 17th century, the English Merchant Company in the guise of a multinational business had transformed itself into a military force with over 200,000 troops and had conquered India’s richest province, Bengal, thus commencing the colonization of India. The course explores the twists and turns of this story.

M  4:50pm-6:50pm                            Online                                                 Ravi Kalia

Last Updated: 01/24/2022 19:17