Spring 2021 Courses, Undergraduate and Graduate

HISTORY DEPARTMENT

SPRING 2021 UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

 

HISTORICAL METHODS

 

21300-The Historian’s Craft (Class-33209/Section-S)

This course introduces students to the study of history. It offers an intensive introduction to historical writing and research, and to the principles and methods of historical analysis. Students will learn about the historical craft as well as gain critical skills that are useful in any discipline or endeavor where research and writing are essential. This course is required for all history majors.

T/TH  5:00pm-6:15pm                                                                                   Alexandra Stern

 

30300-Research Colloquium (HONORS) (Class-33223/Section-3FG)

This course is an intensive workshop on the art and craft of writing primary source-based research papers of History and related disciplines. To enroll in the course, you need the permission from the instructor. You should have a project underway before the start of the semester in order to increase your chances of completing a polished paper by the end of the semester.

W  7:00pm-9:00pm                                                                                        Barbara Naddeo

 

31330-Research Colloquium (Class-33222/Section-3HJ)

This course is an intensive workshop on the art and craft of writing primary source-based research papers of History and related disciplines. To enroll in the course, you need the permission from the instructor. You should have a project underway before the start of the semester in order to increase your chances of completing a polished paper by the end of the semester.

W  7:00pm-9:00pm                                                                                        Barbara Naddeo

 

EUROPE

 

20200-The Ancient World: Rome (Class-48821/Section-F)

Surveys the history of classical antiquity from the Hellenistic Age to the fall of the Western Empire.

M/W  3:30pm-4:45pm                                                                                 Georgios Spiliotopoulos

                                                                                   

20400-Early-Modern Europe (Class-48803/Section-B)

An overview of European history from the resurgence of urban life and classical culture during the Renaissance to the trials and tribulations of the French Revolution.

M/W  9:30am-10:45am                                                                               Barbara Naddeo

 

20600-Modern Europe (Class-33194/Section-E)

An overview of the social, economic, political, and intellectual developments in Europe from the Enlightenment to the present, and an introduction to the study of history. Topics include the problems of revolution, industrialization and the transformation of rural societies, the emergence of liberalism and the challenges it has faced in the twentieth century.

M/W  2:00pm-3:15pm                                                                                    James Lewis

 

20600-Modern Europe (Class-33217/Section-M)

An overview of the social, economic, political, and intellectual developments in Europe from the Enlightenment to the present, and an introduction to the study of history. Topics include the problems of revolution, industrialization and the transformation of rural societies, the emergence of liberalism and the challenges it has faced in the twentieth century.

T/TH  11:00am-12:15pm                                                                               Barbara Syrrakos

 

 HIST 31670- European Legal History (Class-151657/Section-D)

This course provides an overview of the development of law and legal institutions on the European continent and the role law played in the formation of territorial states and world empires as well as the governance of their diverse societies at the cusp of modernity. Topics include the role of law in the construction of polities, from city-states to sovereign nations and territorial empires, and in the policing of culture and identity--from religious beliefs to gender and sexuality. The course will also examine the use of the courts by diverse social groups to assert and codify the rights of modern life, from property rights to the privileges of political citizenship.

M/W  12:30pm-1:45pm                                                                                  Barbara Naddeo

 

32250-European Union (Class-48822/Section-L)

The European Union is the largest democratically conceived confederation of sovereign states in human history, directly affecting a half a billion persons. How has this come to pass, and how does it fare? We will examine earlier examples of union, analyze the nature and origins of the EU in the midst of the Cold War, and explore its mechanics and policies, including immigration, culture, the economy, and Brexit. Texts are historical, theoretical , first-person accounts, and archival, including two comprehensive web-based history and policy archives and a foundational myth.  Who was Europa, after all?

T/TH  9:30am-10:45am                                                                                 Barbara Syrrakos

 

32850 – The French Revolution (Class-48810/Section-M)

A thorough introduction to the French Revolution – one of the defining events of modern times, and the crucible in which key elements of modern politics were forged or redefined: universal manhood suffrage, human rights, civil equality, direct democracy, ideological dictatorship, nationalism, women’s liberation, and revolution itself.

T/TH  11:00am-12:15pm                                                                               Clifford Rosenberg

 

32900-Twentieth Century Europe (Class-48814/Section-H)

What’s Freud got to do with feminism? Or Horkheimer with Hitler, Christian Democracy with the European Union, or colonial independence movements in Africa and Asia with radical student politics in Paris and Prague? You’ll find the answers to these and other questions in this course, which covers Europe during the First World War, the Russian Revolution, the rise of Fascism and Nazism, the Second World War, and their aftermath. You’ll read what the men and women who shaped the 20th century had to say about it. And you’ll learn what it means to evaluate their ideas and actions from a variety of perspectives.

M/W  6:30pm-7:45pm                                                                                    James Lewis

 

35700-History of Socialism (Class-33196/Section-G)

The growth of the socialist movement in the 19th and 20th centuries and its main ideological expressions; utopian, Marxist, revisionist, syndicalist. The relations between ideology and concrete historical circumstances; trade unionism; revolution; working class growth and change; Bolshevism; national liberation.

M/W  5:00pm-6:15pm                                                                                    James Lewis

 

42300-Psychiatry, Madness, and Society (Class-33206/Section-P)

Examines social, cultural, intellectual and institutional aspects of the history of madness in Europe since 1789. The course will begin with the age of the so-called “Great Confinement,” then move on to consider the institutional and therapeutic reforms of the revolutionary and post-revolutionary era; the rise of theories of degeneration, hysteria and neurasthenia in the second half of the 19th century; psychoanalysis and sexology; war neurosis and military psychiatry; psychiatry under the Nazis. It will conclude by looking at the anti-psychiatry movements of the 1980s and 1990s.

T/TH  2:00pm-3:15pm                                                                                   Andreas Killen

 

43000-France and Francophone Africa (Class-48811/Section-P)

We will examine the political, economic, cultural and demographic dialectic between metropolitan France and its former protectorates, territories and departments in various regions of Africa. We will study both the impact of France on these societies and how these former dependencies have transformed mainland France into a multi-ethnic, multi-religious society since the end of the Second World War, often against French popular opinion and preference.

T/TH  2:00pm-3:15pm                                                                                   Clifford Rosenberg

 

THE AMERICAS

 

24000-The United States: From Its Origins to 1877 (Class-33230/Section-C)

The major theological and social conflicts of 17th century English colonies; the political and ideological process that defined an American identity; the social and economic forces that shaped the early Republic; the nature of the regional conflicts that culminated in civil war.

M/W  11:00am-12:15pm                                                                                Alexander Gambaccini

 

24000-The United States: From Its Origins to 1877 (Class-33213/Section-S)

The major theological and social conflicts of 17th century English colonies; the political and ideological process that defined an American identity; the social and economic forces that shaped the early Republic; the nature of the regional conflicts that culminated in civil war.

T/TH  5:00pm-6:15pm                                                                                   Joel Hopkins

 

24100-The United States: Since 1865 (Class-5815/Section-C)

Examines the social and political conflicts that accompanied the transformation of the U.S. from an agrarian republic and slave society to one of the most powerful industries nations in the world. Particular attention will be paid to the building of new social and economic institutions and to cultural and visual representations of the nation its people.                                                                                             Matthew Vaz

M/W 11:00am-12:15 pm                                                                               

 

31688-An Indigenous History of the United States (Class-53293/Section-R)

An introduction to Native American history from pre-contact to the present, this course argues you can’t understand United States history without indigenous people. It focuses on the interrelated histories of Native Americans, African Americans, and the U.S. by indigenizing major American historical developments and addressing current issues in Indian Country.?

T/TH  3:30pm-4:45pm                                                                                   Alexandra Stern

 

32200-The Era of American Revolution (Class-33212/Section-M)

This course details the causes, events, and consequences of one of the first and most important revolutionary movements of the Enlightenment. Particular attention is devoted to the social and political causes of the uprising, as well as its cultural meaning for the different participants in the American scene.

T/TH  11:00am-12:15pm                                                                               Darren Staloff

 

32500-Slavery and Antislavery in the United States (Class-48812/Section-M)

This course will examine how America constructed, opposed, and eventually destroyed the institution of chattel slavery from the beginning of colonization through the American Revolution, the first era of emancipations in the late 18th century, the rise of the Cotton Kingdom, the emergence and progress of radical abolitionism, and the final destruction of slavery during the Civil War and Reconstruction. Special attention will be paid to the ways in which enslaved people of color experienced and resisted enslavement, the political and economic structures that gave birth to and sustained slavery, and the ideals and tactics of antislavery thinkers and activists.

T/TH  11:00am-12:15pm                                                                               John Blanton

 

44900-Power, Race, Culture in NYC (Class-48805/Section-D)                                                               

This course will introduce students to the interdisciplinary study of American culture through an examination of New York City-its history, literature and culture. Students will examine the historical and cultural context of New York as a center of migration and immigration and power, as a cultural capital, and as an arena of racial, ethnic, and religious traditions and conflicts.

M/W  12:30pm-1:45pm                                                                                  Matthew Vaz

 

ASIA

 

25100-Traditional China (Class-48807/Section-R)

The early formation of the Chinese state, the intellectual foundation that has sustained its long history, the shaping of the Confucian way of life, and the cultural sophistication and its decline on the eve of the modern world.

T/TH  3:30pm-4:45pm                                                                                   Danian Hu

 

25100-Traditional China (Class-48808/Section-S)

The early formation of the Chinese state, the intellectual foundation that has sustained its long history, the shaping of the Confucian way of life, and the cultural sophistication and its decline on the eve of the modern world.

T/TH  5:00pm-6:15pm                                                                                   Danian Hu

 

31182-Gandhi and Civil Disobedience (Class-50370/Section-F)

Gandhi's long life was anchored in Truth, and from Truth he devised his forceful civil disobedience (satyagraha) movement. Uniting his countrymen in peaceful protests Gandhi challenged the Raj. The British forces met Gandhi's peaceful soldiers with violence and imprisonment. In this course we will examine India's struggle for freedom, we will learn how Gandhi’s philosophy of nonviolent action overpowered the British government; and we will witness how Gandhi's actions influenced civil rights movements around the world. 

M/W  3:30pm-4:45pm                                                                                    Ravi Kalia

 

46400-Science and Technology in China (Class-48806/Section-M)

A survey of the scientific and technological developments in China from ancient times to the present. The course covers not only the great Chinese inventions and the decline of Chinese science and technology and its consequences, but also more recent achievements and their relation to developments elsewhere in Asia and around the world.

T/TH  11:00am-12:15pm                                                                               Danian Hu

 

MIDDLE EAST

 

31220-Gender and Women in the Middle East (Class-33504/Section-C)

This course examines the history of women and gender from the rise of Islam to the spread of contemporary Islamic political movements. Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which religion shapes women's lives as well as the ways in which women shape religion, women's roles in political and social movements, gendered economic activities, and gender relations.

M/W  11:00am-12:15pm                                                                                Hamideh Sedghi

 

HISTORY DEPARTMENT

SPRING 2021 GRADUATE COURSES

 

B0013-The Atlantic World (Class-48815/Section-4RS)

This course examines the local, regional, and global transformations wrought by interactions between the peoples of Europe, the Americas, and Africa from the 15th to 19th centuries. This course problematizes conventional narratives of “discovery,” “colonization,” and “revolution” by placing them in broader transnational and comparative contexts. Central themes will include: the emergence and development of Atlantic capitalism; the expropriation of Indigenous lands and the struggles of Indigenous people to maintain their autonomy; the construction and development of varied gender roles; the African slave trade, varied systems of Atlantic slavery, and the experiences of enslaved and free African and African-descended peoples.

TH  4:50pm-6:50pm                          Online                                                 John Blanton

 

B0621-Third Reich (Class-48817/Section-2RS)

An introduction to the history of National Socialism. Topics will include the crisis of Weimar Germany, the origins, structure, and evolution of the Nazi regime, Hitler, and the Hitler myth, Nazi culture, the Nazi “new order” in Europe, total war, and the implementation; of the final Solution. Special attention will be given to the question of the memory of the Holocaust.

TU  4:50pm-6:50pm                          Online                                                 Andreas Killen

 

B2321-Research Colloquium (Class-33221/Section-3HJ)

This course is an intensive workshop on the art and craft of writing primary source-based research papers of History and related disciplines. To enroll in the course, you need the permission of the instructor. You should have a project underway before the start of the semester in order to increase your chances of completing a polished paper by the end of the semester.

W  7:00pm-9:00pm                            Online                                                 Barbara Naddeo

 

B4120-US Legal History (Class-48818/Section-1HJ)

This course will introduce students to the major problems and interpretations in the field of American legal history. We will examine a number of key constitutional and legal conflicts in the 19th and 20th century United States through theoretical and historiographical interpretations of those conflicts as well as by acquainting ourselves with a variety of primary sources (including cases, trial records, treatises and legal lives). The course seeks to understand the role of law in American life and the social and cultural meaning of the law in American history. How does the law affect people’s lives? How do we locate those effects? To what degree does the law have an existence separate from other large forces that determine relations of power and possibilities for action? Topics will include slave law; the role of law and economic development; the law of husband and wife; race and the Constitution; the emergence of civil rights and civil liberties, legal ethnics, and the problem of regulations, among others.

M  7:00pm-9:00pm                            Online                                                 Anne Kornhauser

 

B8955-British Mercantilism & Colonization of India (Class-53289/Section-1FG)

At the dawn of Mercantilism in England, the British government authorized English merchants operating in India to “wage war” and “use violence” to establish British dominance in India and Asia. By the end of the 17th century, the English Merchant Company in the guise of a multinational business had transformed itself into a military force with over 200,000 troops and had conquered India’s richest province, Bengal, thus commencing the colonization of India. The course explores the twists and turns of this story.

M  4:50pm-6:50pm                            Online                                                 Ravi Kalia