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Syllabus Physics 32100 General Syllabus

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Syllabus Physics 32100 General Syllabus

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS

Syllabus Physics 32100

Modern Physics for Engineers

 

Designation:

Undergraduate

 

Catalog description:

Introductory historical background, elementary quantum theory, application to one- electron atoms, atomic shell structure and periodic table; nuclear physics, relativity and statistical mechanics. Concepts, quantitative work and problem sets are emphasized.

3 LECT. HR./WK.; 3 CR.

 

Prerequisites:

Prereq.: Physics 20800 or equivalent, Math 20300 or 20900 (elective for Engineering students).

 

Textbook and other suggested material:

Taylor, Zafiratos, Dubson, Modern Physics for Scientists and Engineers (2nd ed.) (required), Pearson/Prentice Hall

 

Course Objectives:

After successfully completing this course, students should be able to

  1. understand and apply Einstein’s theory of special relativity to relativistic mechanics.
  2. understand the significance of the important experiments leading to our understanding of the nature of atoms and of light
  3. understand the Bohr model of the hydrogen atom and the quantization of atomic energy levels.
  4. understand the elements of quantum mechanics: matter waves and wave functions, uncertainty relations, Schrodinger equation, etc.
  5. be familiar with important examples of quantized systems: quantum well, wire and dot, harmonic oscillator, hydrogen atom again, etc.
  6. understand the significance of the Pauli exclusion principle and the periodic table
  7. understand how quantum mechanics is applied in various fields: lasers, physics


of solids, etc.

  1. understand the phenomena associated with the structure of nuclei and radioactivity.
  2. understand the nature of the currently-known elementary particles.



Topics Covered:

  1. Einstein’s theory of special relativity; relativistic mechanics
  2. Important experiments that have led to our current understanding of the nature of atoms and of light, e.g, Millikan oil drop, black-body radiation, Rutherford backscattering, photoelectric effect, etc.
  3. Bohr model of the hydrogen atom; quantization of energy
  4. Elements of quantum mechanics: matter waves and wave functions, uncertainty relations, Schrodinger equation, etc.
  5. Examples of quantized systems: quantum well, wire and dot, harmonic oscillator, hydrogen atom again, etc.
  6. Pauli exclusion principle and the periodic table
  7. Applications of quantum mechanics: lasers, physics of solids, etc.
  8. Nuclei and radioactivity
  9. Elementary particles

 

Class schedule:

3 LECT. HR./WK.; 3 CR.

 

Relationship of course to program outcomes:

The outcomes of this course contribute to the following departmental learning outcomes:

  1. students will be able to synthesize and apply their knowledge of physics and mathematics to solve physics-related problems in a broad range of fields in classical and modern physics, including mechanics, electricity and magnetism, thermodynamics and statistical physics, optics, quantum mechanics, and experimental physics.

c. students will be able to communicate their knowledge effectively and in a professional manner, in both oral and written forms.

 

Person who prepared this description and date of preparation:

Prof. F. W. Smith

email address: fsmith@ccny.cuny.edu date: 9/10/2009