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Syllabus Physics 55200 General Syllabus

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Syllabus Physics 55200 General Syllabus

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS
Syllabus
Physics 55200
Quantum Physics II
Designation:
Required
Catalog description:
Review of Schrodinger equation, Uncertainty principle. Formalism: observables, operators, etc., Application to simple cases: 2 level systems, electron in a magnetic field; angular momentum – Bohr model revisited; magnetic properties of solids; time independent perturbation theory and applications; time dependent perturbation theory; lasers, masers, etc., Adiabatic processes: Berry’s phase, when does phase matter?, Bell’s theorem and recent experiments. 4 Hr./WK.;4 CR.
Prerequisites:
Prereq: Physics 55100, Mathematics 39100, 39200.
Textbook and other suggested material:
Eisberg, R. and Resnick, R., Quantum Physics of Atoms, Molecules, Solids, Nuclei, and Particles, Second Edition, John Wiley and Sons (required).
Griffiths, D. J., Introduction to Quantum Mechanics, Second Edition, Pearson Prentice Hall (required).
Course Objectives:
After successfully completing this course, students should be able to:
1.
Solve the Schrodinger equation for simple dynamical systems, including three-dimensional problems;
2.
Understand and apply the quantum mechanical formalism to make predictions as to the outcome of experiments;
3.
Solve problems involving two level systems including electrons or protons in a magnetic field and laser operation;
4.
Solve problems involving angular momentum;
5.
Extend the range of problems that may be studied by using time independent perturbation theory;
6.
Extend the range of problems that may be studied by using time dependent perturbation theory;
7.
Understand the application of the adiabatic theorem to quantum mechanical systems, including the role played by the Berry phase;
8.
Understand the role quantum mechanics plays in selected areas of atomic, molecular, optical, solid-state, nuclear and particle physics;
9.
Understand the implications of quantum mechanics for the measurement process as it relates to such topics as the uncertainty principle, the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox, Schrodinger’s cat, Bell’s theorem, Aspect’s experiment and other recent experiments.
Topics Covered:
1.
The Schrodinger equation for the hydrogen atom
2.
Formalism of quantum mechanics: Hilbert space, observables, Hermitian operators, eigenfunctions, eigenvalues, expectation values, the Copenhagen interpretation, uncertainty relation, and bra-ket notation.
3.
The two-level system
4.
Quantization of angular momentum
5.
Time-independent perturbation theory
6.
Time-dependent perturbation theory
7.
The adiabatic approximation
8.
Applications to atomic physics
9.
Applications to molecular physics
10.
Applications to laser physics
11.
Applications to solid state physics
12.
Applications to nuclear physics
13.
Applications to particle physics
14.
The measurement process
Class schedule:
4 LECT HR./WK. (55200, 4 CR.)
Relationship of course to program outcomes:
The outcomes of this course contribute to the following departmental outcome:
a.
Learn laws of physics and solve problems.
Assessment tools:
1.
Midterm examination;
2.
Final examination;
3.
Homework assignments.
4.
Class participation.
Person who prepared this description and date of preparation:
J. I. Gersten
Email address: jgersten@ccny.cuny.edu
Date: August 10, 2007
Academic Integrity and Plagiarism
The CUNY Policy on Academic Integrity can be found at
http://web.cuny.edu/academics/info-central/policies/academic-integrity.pdf
This policy defines cheating as “the unauthorized use or attempted use of material, information, notes, study aids, devices or communication during an academic exercise.” The CUNY Policy on plagiarism says the following about plagiarism (the CUNY Policy can be found in Appendix B.3 of the CCNY Undergraduate Bulletin 2007 -2009 as well as the web site listed above):
Plagiarism is the act of presenting another person’s ideas, research or writings as your own. The following are some examples of plagiarism, but by no means is it an exhaustive list:
1. Copying another person’s actual words without the use of quotation marks and footnotes attributing the words to their source.
2. Presenting another person’s ideas or theories in your own words without acknowledging the source.
3. Using information that is not common knowledge without acknowledging the source.
4. Failing to acknowledge collaborators on homework and laboratory assignments.
5. Internet plagiarism includes submitting downloaded term papers or parts of term papers, paraphrasing or copying information from the internet without citing the source, and “cutting and pasting” from various sources without proper attribution.
The City College Faculty Senate has approved a procedure for addressing violations of academic integrity, which can also be found in Appendix B.3 of the CCNY Undergraduate Bulletin.”