Course Descriptions

Spring 2021

Course Descriptions


All classes for Spring 2021 on the CCNY Downtown Campus will be offered remotely. See the instructor’s note on remote course modes below each class/section description.  The following modes will be used.

Synchronous: You will meet live in real-time on the day and time scheduled.

Asynchronous/Fully Online: You will not have any required live sessions and students can complete the work on their own schedule (many instructors teaching this way hold optional live office/discussion hours).

Hybrid/Blended: You will meet live in real-time for part of the class session on the scheduled day (e.g., 6:00-7:30, or every other week for the full time, or for roughly 1/3 of the class sessions, etc.) and asynchronously for the rest of the time.

ANTH 22804, 4CWE [50399] --Thursday 6:00 - 9:20 PM

ANTH 22804, 4CWE  [50399]-Thursday   6:00 - 9:20 PM-Urban Anthropology-Calagione

Anthropological perspectives on the understanding of the urban experience. Urbanization and urbanism from an international perspective. The forces that shape people’s lives in the metropolis. Topics will include the role of institutions, landscapes, ethnicity, race, class, poverty and culture in urban life. Emphasis on urban institutions, ethnicity, race and class in New York City.  THIS COURSE REQUIRES WEEKLY ONLINE PARTICIPATION. STUDENTS MUST BE PREPARED TO USE ONLINE RESOURCES BEFORE THE FIRST CLASS. Pre-req.: Introductory social science or equivalent. 4 hrs.; 4 crs. (W)(U) Instructor’s note:  Hybrid/Blended.  Zoom

EDCE 20614, 2CWE [33449] --Tuesday 5:30 - 8:50 PM

EDCE 20614, 2CWE  [33449]-Tuesday   5:30 - 8:50 PM-ECE II: Development, Assessment, Teaching and Learning in Inclusive Settings    Diaz

Students construct a working understanding of theorists such as Dewey, Piaget and Vygotsky, as applied to young children and the curriculum and practices that support their growth. Students will explore typical and inclusive classroom practices in depth.  These understandings are grounded in systematic observations culminating in a child study. Fieldwork required. Pre-requisite: EDCE 20604. 4 hr.; 4 cr. (W)

EDCE 20614, 6CWE [33450] Saturday 9:00 AM -12:20 PM

EDCE 20614, 6CWE  [33450]    Saturday   9:00 AM -12:20 PM
ECE II: Development, Assessment, Teaching and Learning in Inclusive Settings    Matthews


Students construct a working understanding of theorists such as Dewey, Piaget and Vygotsky, as applied to young children and the curriculum and practices that support their growth. Students will explore typical and inclusive classroom practices in depth.  These understandings are grounded in systematic observaions culminating in a child study. Fieldwork required. Pre-requisite: EDCE 20604. 4 hr.; 4 cr. (W) Instructor’s Note:  Hybrid/Blended.  Asynchronous work, 1/3 is live lecture. Zoom

EDCE 31904, 4CWE [31237] Thursday 5:30 - 7:10 PM

EDCE 31904, 4CWE   [31237]    Thursday   5:30 - 7:10 PM
Science Methods in E.C.E.    Silverstein


The Science Methods class will use readings, written reflection, field trips, individual projects, group presentations, class activities and discussion to help students develop an understanding of the role of the early childhood teacher in building a foundation for early childhood science education with young learners.  The class will include methods and strategies that are compatible with authentic early childhood educational goals, enabling ECEece students to grow as teachers who will be able to provide appropriate practices and guidance that will allow all young children the means to explore and appreciate science concepts.  Open only to students formally accepted into the Early Childhood Education Program. Fieldwork required.  2 hr.; 2 cr. Note: This two-credit course meets for 3 hours and 20 minutes every other week after the first class meeting of the semester. Instructor’s Note:  Synchronous.  Zoom

EDCE 40200, 2CWE [31293] Tuesday 7:30 - 9:10 PM

EDCE 40200, 2CWE  [31293]    Tuesday   7:30 - 9:10 PM
Language Development and Emergent Literacy II    Crosby


This course will examine the theory and practice that supports language and literacy development of children in grades K-2.  The course will focus on children’s oral interactions, reading, and writing development and experiences throughout the early elementary years. Must be taken with EDCE 40300.  Pre-Req.: EDCE 32304 and formal admission to the Early Childhood Education program. Fieldwork Required. 2 hr.; 2 cr. (W)

EDCE 40300, 2CWE [31294] Tuesday 5:30 - 7:10 PM

EDCE 40300, 2CWE  [31294]    Tuesday   5:30 - 7:10 PM
Social Studies in ECE    Garavuso


Students will explore theories, methods, and materials to help the child understand his/her immediate environments and relations to them. Emphasis on family, classroom, school, and neighborhood.  Must be taken with EDUC 40200.  Pre-Req.: EDUC 32304 and formal admission to the Early Childhood Education program.. Fieldwork Required. 2 hr.; 2 cr. (W)

EDCE 40800, 4CWE [31295] Thursday 4:00 - 5:40 PM

EDCE 40800, 4CWE  [31295]    Thursday   4:00 - 5:40 PM
Student Teaching and Integrative Seminar in ECE    Wilgus


Classroom structures, routines, teaching strategies and skills that build community and maintain discipline with a range of learners.  Understandings and skills to plan a coherent and integrated curriculum. Assessment systems that inform teaching and support student learning.  Respectful and effective home-school relations.  The Student Teaching Seminar will be held at CWE. Students who have been approved for Supervised Student Teaching will be registered for this course by the Office of Field Student teaching.   Full time, 360 hours.  Coreq.: See Advisor.  6 hr.; 2 cr.

HIST 31974, 5CWE [50554] Friday 6:00 - 9:20 PM

HIST 31974, 5CWE  [50554]    Friday   6:00 - 9:20 PM
Education in Black and White    Diop


This course surveys the history of education in the United States. How did the system we have now evolve?  How, why and when did disparities based on class, race, gender, and region develop?   To understand these questions, we will look at education in the colonies, changes after the American Revolution, education for whites, free, and enslaved blacks before the Civil War and the impact of emancipation on national public education.  Through an historical examination of class and race in educational philosophies, practices and opportunities, we will seek ultimately to understand current issues in American education.  Students will work with both primary and secondary source materials, strengthen their academic reading and writing skills, and become competent in historical research. 4hrs.; 4crs. (W)(U) Instructor’s Note:  Synchronous.  Zoom, Blackboard

IAS A5010, 3CWE [50801] Wednesday 5:30 - 7:10 PM (Graduate)

IAS A5010, 3CWE  [50801]                                                                  Wednesday   5:30 - 7:10 PM
Graduate Research Methodology (Graduate)    Benedicty


This course will trace the changing definition of American Studies, originating as a field of study with a focus primarily on the United States to projects spanning both American continents.  Students will study the field’s relationship to twentieth-century social movements and related theoretical categories, including Marxist theory, cultural studies, feminist theory, post- colonial theory, and ethnic studies. They will learn the various research techniques necessary to produce graduate-level writing in their courses in the Study of the Americas.  Students will choose a topic, develop a research agenda, conduct interdisciplinary research, and write a final paper of 15-20 pages. Open only to students accepted into the M.A. in the Study of the Americas program.  3 hr,; 3 cr. (G)

IAS A5106, 2CWE [50829] Tuesday 6:00 - 7:40 PM (Graduate)

IAS A5106, 2CWE  [50829]    Tuesday   6:00 - 7:40 PM
Haiti and The Americas from the Revolution to Today (Graduate)              Valdés                                      

In this seminar, we will examine the contributions of Haiti to the Western hemisphere and the world. Beginning with Columbus’s arrival on the Taino island of Ayiti, and drawing from literary and historical sources, we will study the importance of the Haitian Revolution and its immediate impact on the surrounding countries, including its challenge to prevailing discourses of liberty and freedom as defined by Western European intellectuals. Other moments covered will include the War of Restoration in the Dominican Republic; the US military occupation of the entire island; early 20th-century migration of workers to Cuba; the 1937 Massacre; the rise and fall of the Duvalier regimes; the legacy of Jean-Bertrand Aristide; the earthquake of 2010 and its aftermath. Over the course of the semester, we will center Haiti and its rich history, restoring it to its needed place in the Study of the Americas.  All readings will be posted to Blackboard; assignments will also include music and film selections. course description coming soon 3 hr. 3 cr. (Graduate)

IAS A6140, 3CWE [50825] Wednesday 7:30 - 9:10 PM (Graduate)

IAS A6140, 3CWE  [50825]                                                                  Wednesday   7:30 - 9:10 PM
Forced Migrations in the Americas (Graduate)    Zach

The number of forcibly displaced persons has reached a record-level high, with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) estimating the size of this population at 79.5 million. This course explores the involuntary movement of peoples across borders and within countries stemming from such factors as armed conflict, state fragility, persecution, climate change, disaster, and development initiatives. In addition to considering the causes of forced migration, it also examines geographic patterns, the vulnerabilities of displaced persons, and the role of key actors such as states, UN agencies, and nongovernmental organizations in migration processes. It also delves into the consequences of forcible displacement for individuals, families, and societies, as well as national and international politics.  The course draws connections between these and the rise of populism, illiberalism, far-right parties, xenophobia, and interstate tensions. We will take a critical, interdisciplinary approach, interrogating the distinction between forced and voluntary migration, practices of border security, and the limits of existing international law and organization.  We will also examine how forcibly displaced persons have opposed abuse through artwork, literature, and protest. The course will focus on countries within the Americas from the latter twentieth century to the present.course description coming soon. 3 hr. 3 cr. (graduate) Instructor’s Note:  Hybrid/Blended.  Zoom, Blackboard

IAS A7010, 4CWE [50806] Thursday 6:00 - 7:40 PM (Graduate)

IAS A7010, 4CWE  [50806]    Thursday   6:00 - 7:40 PM
MA CapstoneCapstone: Climate Change, Sustainability and Urban life in the Americas     (Graduate)  Schaller

 

Fires and floods, pandemics and sea-level rise, hurricanes and mass migrations--this capstone class focuses on urban sustainability in the context of climate change. Given the reality of climate change, we will explore what this means for urban areas throughout the Americas. How might we relate these concepts to the idea of justice? Using an interdisciplinary lens, we will read works like Christian Parenti's Tropic of Chaos and Octavia E. Butler's Parable of the Sower, and view films such as Icíar Bollaín's Even the Rain.  
The course will focus on processes of urbanization as they relate to sustainability. Cities are are often associated with disorder, disease, danger, and inequality. Yet, planners, architects, sociologists, scientists, engineers, writers and artists have also looked to cities for inspiration. They have often sought to harness both optimism and pragmatism to try to imagine and shape a more “sustainable” future. So, in this capstone course, we will examine climate change and its impacts, moving between levels of governance from the global to the local. We will ask what we mean by "sustainability" more broadly and by “sustainable development" specifically. We will analyze this through the lenses of environmental racism and environmental justice and will investigate how areas of planning, such as land use, culture, housing, food systems, and mobility, intersect with the built environment and shape socioeconomic and cultural dimensions of neighborhood life. Students will be asked to complete capstone projects of their own design that address questions of sustainability and urban life.course description coming soon
  3 hr, 3 cr (graduateG)

IAS 10000, 1CWE [32884] Monday 6:00 - 9:20 PM

IAS 10000, 1CWE  [32884]    Monday   6:00 - 9:20 PM
Writing for Interdisciplinary Studies I    Clark


This is an interdisciplinary, humanities-based writing course. Reading includes a wide range of essays, each proposing a ground-breaking theory pertinent to a particular discipline. These essays will be matched with short fiction and shorter essays providing a social context for the theories proposed by writers such as Sigmund Freud, Karl Marx, Dr. Martin Luther King, Carl Jung, Alice Walker and Virginia Woolf. In response to these combinations, text-based student essays of at least 750 words will pair interdisciplinary theory with a social context. The course emphasizes critical reading, thinking, and writing skills as well as various rhetorical approaches to the composition of the academic essay. (Formerly Core Humanities I, Literature, Art and Human Experience)  4 hrs, 4 cr. Instructor’s Note:  Hybrid/Blended, most coursework completed synchronously, weekly  Zoom meetings from 6pm – 7:30pm are required.  Zoom, Blackboard

IAS 10500, 2CWE [50580] Tuesday 6:00 - 9:20 PM

IAS 10500, 2CWE  [50580]                                                                         Tuesday   6:00 - 9:20 PM
Nature and Human Beings II (Core Natural Science II)    Niraula


Nature and Human Beings II introduces students to fundamental ideas in biological and physical sciences as well as the interaction of science with society. One of the important aims will be to develop an understanding of the scientific method with an emphasis on model building and the possibilities and limitations of science and technology. The course will examine the origin and evolution of the universe, the earth and life.  Pre-req.: IAS 10000, IAS 10100 or equivalent. 4 hr.; 4 cr. Instructor’s Note:  Hybrid/Blended.  Zoom, Blackboard

IAS 10500, 6CWE [32885] Saturday 1:00 - 4:20 PM

IAS 10500, 6CWE  [32885]    Saturday   1:00 - 4:20 PM
Nature and Human Beings II (Core Natural Science II)    Niraula


Nature and Human Beings II introduces students to fundamental ideas in biological and physical sciences as well as the interaction of science with society. One of the important aims will be to develop an understanding of the scientific method with an emphasis on model building and the possibilities and limitations of science and technology. The course will examine the origin and evolution of the universe, the earth and life.  Pre-req.: IAS 10000, IAS 10100 or equivalent. 4 hr.; 4 cr. Instructor’s Note:  Hybrid/Blended.  Zoom, Blackboard

IAS 10800, CW2N [32886] Fully Online

IAS 10800, CW2N  [32886]    Fully Online
Doing Social Research    Robinson


This course will help develop needed research skills by focusing on a particular social problem each term.  It will ask, where did the "problem" come from; how has it been analyzed; and how should we evaluate the answers?  Using historical and contemporary examples, students will learn basic research techniques, from use of the library, to developing a bibliography, to finding and using quantitative evidence. Recommended Pre- or Co-requisite: IAS 10000, IAS 10100, or equivalent.  4 hrs.; 4 crs. (W) Instructor’s Note:  Asynchronous/Fully Online

IAS 10800, CWNT [32896] Fully Online

IAS 10800, CWNT  [32896]    Fully Online
Doing Social Research    Robinson


This course will help develop needed research skills by focusing on a particular social problem each term.  It will ask, where did the "problem" come from; how has it been analyzed; and how should we evaluate the answers?  Using historical and contemporary examples, students will learn basic research techniques, from use of the library, to developing a bibliography, to finding and using quantitative evidence.  Recommended Pre- or Co-requisite: IAS 10000, IAS 10100, or equivalent.  4 hrs.; 4 crs. (W) Instructor’s Note:  Asynchronous/Fully Online

IAS 20200, 5CWE [50585] Friday 6:00 - 9:20 PM

IAS 20200, 5CWE  [50585]    Friday   6:00 - 9:20 PM
Art On and Off The Wall II    Benedetto


This course is designed to acquaint students with a range of art related encounters and the creative process. The course will present learning opportunities designed to encourage and engage students in thinking about and participating in the artistic process through interactions with materials, methods, and discussion with colleagues. Artistic thinking and the development of criticism and artistic vocabulary and language will pursue via activities, practice, reflections, research, a museum visit and exposure to art of various kinds. As the title of the course suggests, not only will we be addressing framed or sculptural works, but we will strive to understand the pursuit of the artist to "push the limits" that challenges the way we see and understand our relationship to the world. Students may take this course on a pass/fail basis. Second part of a two semester sequence, students may take either part of the sequence independently. 4 hrs.; 4 crs.
Note:  Although there is no assigned text for this course, the cost of art supplies may exceed $100.00.

IAS 23304, 3CWE [32894] Wednesday 6:00 - 9:20 PM

IAS 23304, 3CWE  [32894]    Wednesday   6:00 - 9:20 PM
The Essay    Moore


The essay often gets a bad rap these days. It’s frequently associated with the five-paragraph work of formal essay writing. But the essay, in its purest form, is the exploration of an idea, no matter how many paragraphs or diversions—stylistic or rhetorical—it takes. The word essay itself comes from the old French essai, which means, “to try,” and the Latin: rudimentum, which means “trial or attempt.” So, how do we define Creative Non-Fiction? It's not quite journalism. It's not quite “formal” essay writing but essay writing in its wholesome form. Creative Non-Fiction is a branch of writing that employs the literary techniques usually associated with actual people, places, or events. Creative Non-Fiction requires imagination—it evokes an image, draws on emotion, and it creates a lasting impression on the reader.  In this class, we will “try” and write about our lives as we mirror, and read from a broad category of prose works such as personal essays and memoirs, narrative essays, observational and descriptive essays.  Pre-requisites: Writing for Interdisciplinary Studies I and II or equivalent. (Formerly ENGL 31134)  4 hrs.; 4 crs. (W)(U)

IAS 23304, 6CWE [32899] Saturday 6:00 - 9:20 PM

IAS 23304, 6CWE  [32899]    Saturday   6:00 - 9:20 PM The Essay    Moore


The essay often gets a bad rap these days. It’s frequently associated with the five-paragraph work of formal essay writing. But the essay, in its purest form, is the exploration of an idea, no matter how many paragraphs or diversions—stylistic or rhetorical—it takes. The word essay itself comes from the old French essai, which means, “to try,” and the Latin: rudimentum, which means “trial or attempt.” So, how do we define Creative Non-Fiction? It's not quite journalism. It's not quite “formal” essay writing but essay writing in its wholesome form. Creative Non-Fiction is a branch of writing that employs the literary techniques usually associated with actual people, places, or events. Creative Non-Fiction requires imagination—it evokes an image, draws on emotion, and it creates a lasting impression on the reader.  In this class, we will “try” and write about our lives as we mirror, and read from a broad category of prose works such as personal essays and memoirs, narrative essays, observational and descriptive essays.  Pre-requisites: Writing for Interdisciplinary Studies I and II or equivalent. (Formerly ENGL 31134)  4 hrs.; 4 crs. (W)(U)

IAS 23324, 1CWE [32887] Monday 6:00 - 9:20 PM

IAS 23324, 1CWE  [32887]    Monday   6:00 - 9:20 PM
Advanced Composition    Sweeting


This course will introduce students to cultural and literary theory. We will survey a number of important schools of critical theory, including formalism, structuralism, deconstruction, psychoanalytic, new historicism, post-colonial and cultural studies. Theorists studied will include Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault, Susan Sontag, and Sigmund Freud. Their theory will be studied alongside a variety of "texts", including the poetry of William Wordsworth and Samuel Coleridge, Shakespeare’s The Tempest, Flaubert’s Madame Bovary, and Anderson’s Winesburg, Ohio, as well as Jamaica Kincaid’s Annie John, the art of Edward Hopper, the Log of Christopher Columbus, The National Defense Education Act of 1954, and Why Johnny Can’t Read. The goal is to acquire a new critical vocabulary --"critique"--and, of course, to sharpen critical reading, thinking and writing skills. Students will be required to write a number of shorter essays on the above texts and a final ten-page critical essay on that perennial bestseller, written by none other than Dr. Seuss, The Cat in the Hat.  Formerly CWE 31308.  4 hrs.; 4 crs. (W)(U) Instructor’s Note:  Hybrid/Blended.  Zoom

IAS 23324, 2CWE [32888] Tuesday 6:00 - 9:20 PM

IAS 23324, 2CWE  [32888]    Tuesday   6:00 - 9:20 PM

Advanced Composition    Sweeting
This course will introduce students to cultural and literary theory. We will survey a number of important schools of critical theory, including formalism, structuralism, deconstruction, psychoanalytic, new historicism, post-colonial and cultural studies. Theorists studied will include Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault, Susan Sontag, and Sigmund Freud. Their theory will be studied alongside a variety of "texts", including the poetry of William Wordsworth and Samuel Coleridge, Shakespeare’s The Tempest, Flaubert’s Madame Bovary, and Anderson’s Winesburg, Ohio, as well as Jamaica Kincaid’s Annie John, the art of Edward Hopper, the Log of Christopher Columbus, The National Defense Education Act of 1954, and Why Johnny Can’t Read. The goal is to acquire a new critical vocabulary --"critique"--and, of course, to sharpen critical reading, thinking and writing skills. Students will be required to write a number of shorter essays on the above texts and a final ten-page critical essay on that perennial bestseller, written by none other than Dr. Seuss, The Cat in the Hat.  Formerly CWE 31308.  4 hrs.; 4 crs. (W)(U) Instructor’s Note:  Hybrid/Blended.  Zoom

AS 24200, 2CWE [32889] Tuesday 6:00 - 9:20 PM

IAS 24200, 2CWE  [32889]    Tuesday   6:00 - 9:20 PM
Introduction to Interdisciplinary Studies    Schaller


This course explores the establishment, growth, and transformation of academic knowledge in the humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences. It exposes students to the diversity of academic inquiry and the different traditions and vocabularies of humanistic, scientific, and social scientific inquiry, while exploring the potential and limits of interdisciplinary inquiry. (Formerly IAS 31334)  4hr., 4cr. (W)(U)

IAS 24200, 4CWE [50733] Thursday 6:00 - 9:20 PM

IAS 24200, 4CWE  [50733]    Thursday   6:00 - 9:20 PM
Introduction to Interdisciplinary Studies    Zach


This course explores the establishment, growth, and transformation of academic knowledge in the humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences. It exposes students to the diversity of academic inquiry and the different traditions and vocabularies of humanistic, scientific, and social scientific inquiry, while exploring the potential and limits of interdisciplinary inquiry. (Formerly IAS 31334)  4hr., 4cr. (W)(U) Instructor’s Note:  Synchronous.  Zoom, Blackboard

IAS 24200, CWNT [50734] Fully Online

IAS 24200, CWNT  [50734]    Fully Online
Introduction to Interdisciplinary Studies    Matthews


This course explores the establishment, growth, and transformation of academic knowledge in the humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences. It exposes students to the diversity of academic inquiry and the different traditions and vocabularies of humanistic, scientific, and social scientific inquiry, while exploring the potential and limits of interdisciplinary inquiry. (Formerly IAS 31334)  4hr., 4cr. (W)(U) Instructor’s Note:  Asynchronous/Fully online

IAS 31148, 6CWE [50735] Saturday 1:00 - 4:20 PM

IAS 31148, 6CWE  [50735]    Saturday   1:00 - 4:20 PM
The Global City on Film    Kopp


At the dawn of the Machine Age in the late 1800s – right around the time that motion pictures were just being invented – less than 10% of the world’s population was urban. By the year 2009, humanity had reached an important tipping point: for the first time ever, more than half of the world’s people dwelled in cities. This has been a remarkably rapid and radical transformation of the way we live, perhaps unparalleled in history, and movies have been around to document this great migration while it happened. Films have often celebrated the rise of the city and its promise of opportunity, but they’ve also found much to criticize. This course will explore a wide range of issues – economic, social, cultural and environmental - relating to urbanization and urban design. Some films we are likely to look at, among others, are: Berlin: Symphony of a Great City; Man With a Movie Camera; Metropolis; “A Bronx Morning”; The City; Chronicle of a Summer; Calcutta; Blade Runner; La Ciudad; The Unforeseen; Manufactured Landscapes; Pruitt-Igoe; Detropia; Lost Rivers; Urbanized; and Surviving Progress. Students should expect required outside viewing on the internet every second or third week 4 hr. 4 cr. (W)(U)

IAS 31214, CWNT [32897] Fully Online

IAS 31214, CWNT  [32897]  Fully Online   
Autism Spectrum Disorders in Young Children     DuMoulin


This course will help participants understand the characteristics of young children with autism spectrum disorders, the effects of having a child with autism in the family, parental roles, and intervention approaches designed to meet the special needs of this population. 4hr.; 4cr. (W)(U) (Developmental Disabilities Certificate Program) Instructor’s note:  Asynchronous/Fully Online

IAS 31223, 4CWE [50736] Thursday 6:00 - 9:20 PM

IAS 31223, 4CWE  [50736]    Thursday   6:00 - 9:20 PM
Contemporary Issues in Family Health    Andino


Unhealthy food is available everywhere.  Fast-food chains, and liquor stores, are on almost every block; and soda machines, vending machines, are claiming the lives of our children by promoting unhealthy eating.  This is the first time in history when we have had to worry about the health of children under 12 years of age, and the development of high rates of diabetes, obesity and heart attacks.  This course will take a look at how the food industry undermines our health and what we can do to fight back. 4 hr.; 4 cr. (W) (U) Instructor’s Note:  Hybrid/Blended.  Zoom, Blackboard

IAS 31235, 1CWE [32892] Monday 6:00 - 9:20 PM

IAS 31235, 1CWE  [32892]    Monday   6:00 - 9:20 PM
Intro to Developmental Disabilities    Ortiz-Suloway


This course will provide an overview of the field of developmental disabilities. The perspective is interdisciplinary, and in addition to surveying the nature, diagnosis and treatment of such disorders as intellectual disability, autism, epilepsy, learning disabilities, and cerebral palsy, related areas such as legal ramifications and advocacy will be studied. This introductory course is recommended for workers in the area of developmental disabilities, paraprofessionals in the public school system (especially in Special Education), and others interested in learning about developmental disabilities.  4 hr.; 4 cr.  (W)(U) (Developmental Disabilities Certificate Program) Instructor’s Note:  Synchronous.  Zoom, Blackboard, Email

IAS 31240, 5CWE [32893] Friday 6:00 - 9:20 PM

IAS 31240, 5CWE  [32893]    Friday   6:00 - 9:20 PM
Issues for Adults with Developmental Disabilities    Sutherland-Cohen


This course will identify critical issues confronting developmentally disabled adults, and will survey strategies for coping with these challenges. Case methodology will be used to discuss problems and techniques that arise in work, family or community situations. Intended primarily for practitioners in the field.  Pre-req.: IAS 31235 or permission.  4 hr.; 4 cr. (W)(U)(Developmental Disabilities Certificate Program) Instructor’s Note:  Hybrid/Blended.  Zoom, Blackboard

IAS 31243, 1CWE [50738] Monday 6:00 - 9:20 PM

IAS 31243, 1CWE  [50738]                                                                         Monday   6:00 - 9:20 PM
Listening to The City    Cardenas Pena


How do you experience the city? Do you "tune-out" with headphones, lose yourself in your smartphone or iPhone and simply put your head down, speed walk, and shut out the world with your own internal conversations? In this class students will learn to break through these habitual barriers to experience and reacquaint themselves with their city through their bodies, mainly through listening. There are many artistic, ecological and even political concerns that listening provides access to — specifically in urban environments — and students will engage their oft-neglected sense of hearing to experience the sounds and sonic contours of New York City. Students will read texts from the fields of cultural studies, acoustic ecology, economics, musicology, philosophy, art, and art criticism to develop a broad view of the various types of practices that engage our ears and our bodies. Students will actively listen to various locations throughout the city and work on projects that document their experiences through expository and creative writing, audio recording and through photography (and/or video) while engaging with critical texts that place their activities into historical, cultural, artistic and political contexts. 4 hrs., 4 crs. Instructor’s Note:  Synchronous.  Blackboard

IAS 31246, 2CWE [50739] Tuesday 6:00 - 9:20 PM

IAS 31246, 2CWE  [50739]    Tuesday   6:00 - 9:20 PM
Black Working Class Culture and Politics    Orange


This course will explore the values, perspectives and behaviors of black workers as they actively and creatively shape their world. We will examine how work, home, and leisure intersect to conceal, reveal, and reify widely shared discourses of contemporary Black life. We will also take up the historical tensions between the various class and gender representations that form the Black "community". Central questions for this course will be how broader political, economic and social forces shape our perceptions of Black workers, and circumscribe their choices, expectations, and options.  4hr., 4cr. (W)(U) Instructor’s Note:  Hybrid/Blended.  Blackboard, also Microsoft TEAMS

IAS 31280, CWNT [50740] Fully Online

IAS 31280, CWNT  [50740]    Fully Online
Women & the Law (online)    Robinson


Have women come a long way?  How does the law look at women and how do women look at the law?  After a historical review of how women came into existence under the law, we will look at vexing decisions by the Supreme Court about reproductive rights and equal treatment in school and the workplace.  Then we look at the continuing gender gap in politics.  How are women as lawmakers?  What kind of laws do women support by their voting behavior?  The class will be a HYBRID class, ending with an online component of approximately three classes: students will conduct a self-made survey on attitudes towards child care policy and analyze the results, working collaboratively online to examine whether there is a gender gap when it comes to child care.  4hrs.; 4crs. (W)(U) Instructor’s Note:  Asynchronous/Fully Online

IAS 31293, 4CWE [50781] Thursday 6:00 - 9:20 PM

IAS 31293, 4CWE  [50781]    Thursday   6:00 - 9:20 PM
Disability and the Family Life Cycle    Senior


This course focuses on disability viewed from the perspective of lifespan development and the family life cycle. Students who complete the course will be knowledgeable about: the relationship between Disability Studies, lifespan developmental psychology and the sociology of the family; the use of autobiographical narratives and personal accounts by people with disabilities to address critical issues across the life span and throughout the 4 subsystems in a family(marital, parental, sibling and extrafamilial); the experience of parents and siblings of a family member with a disability; self-determination and family involvement in the transition from school to adult life for youth with disabilities; family life of adults with disabilities including marriage, parenting, caring for aging parents and the death of parents; the importance of social networks in the lives of people with disabilities; the negative impact of stigma on individuals with mental illness and family members and on the delivery of quality mental health services in the community; behavioral and mental health changes associated with aging adults with intellectual disabilities, autism, and individuals dually diagnosed with intellectual disabilities and psychiatric disorders; and using person-centered planning and self-advocacy to improve the quality of life. 4 hr.,4cr. (W)(U) Instructor’s Note:  Hybrid/Blended.  Class will meet live the first two sessions, after that class will meet live every third session. Zoom

IAS 31297, 6CWE [50782] Saturday 9:00 AM -12:20 PM

IAS 31297, 6CWE  [50782]                                 Saturday   9:00 AM -12:20 PM
Gender in Historical Perspective    Hilkey


From Davy Crockett and Betsy Ross, to the lady on a pedestal and the self-made man; from Black Bucks and plantation mistresses to robber barons, dandies and Gibson girls; from the prize fighter and the New Woman to the gangster and the white collar man; from Rosie the Riveter and war heroes to Betty Boop and Betty Crocker to Betty Friedan; from Black Panthers and Young Lords, to the wolves of Wall Street and Cosmo girls; from queens and queers and dikes to LGBTQ we have no shortage of names and stereotypes about gender and sexuality in American history.  How and why have ideas about gender and sexuality changed from Colonial Times to the present?  What has it meant to "be a man" or to "be a woman in different times and places?  How is the body itself sexed and gendered in different times and places, and how have different bodies been regulated at different historical moments??  What do the sexual and gender ideals, norms and taboos reveal about the period in which they emerged and became commonplace?  In what ways do practices and ideas about sexuality and gender express hierarchy, subordination and dominance among classes and races as well as men, women, trans, and non-binary people?  These are some of the questions we will explore through readings, discussion and essay-writing in this course.  This course will use the HYBRID/BLENDED format, meeting 9:30 -11am every Saturday followed by  “student/faculty office hours” for individual and small group consultation from 11-11:30am or as needed.   Pre-requisite.  IAS 10000, IAS 10100 or equivalent. 4 hr.; 4cr. (W)(U) Instructor’s Note:  Hybrid/Blended. Blackboard

IAS 31500, CWNT [50783] Fully Online

IAS 31500, CWNT  [50783]    Fully Online
A Child's Eye View of the World     

                                                                                                     Clark
This course will cover literary narrative from a child’s perspective. These texts are not “children’s” or “young adult” works; they are adult novels whose story is told from a child’s-eye view of the world. First we will discuss narrative perspectives, as some of these stories are related through a child narrator, while others come from an omniscient narrator who is able to relate the child’s reception of the world, as well as thoughts about, and reaction to what is perceived. Then we will turn to the novels themselves, often paired with relevant psychological scholarship pertaining to the children in each.  Our novels will cover questions of identity, trauma from within or without the family, autism, and parental relationships. Those interested in childhood studies and/or child development, as well as those who plan to write creatively should find the course illuminating.
Pre-Requisite: Students should complete IAS 10000 or an equivalent Pathways writing course, as it is reading and writing intensive.  This course is being offered in an asynchronous, fully online-format.  Familarity with the Blackboard online learning platform is a must. There are, however, orientation sessions for students taking their first online course, and help is available in the CWE Computer Lab.  Also, students must have a Citymail email address to gain access to the course site.  4hr.; 4 cr. (W)(U)  Instructor’s Note:  Asynchronous/Fully Online

IAS 31700, 3CWE [50785] Wednesday 5:30 - 9:20 PM

IAS 31700, 3CWE  [50785]    Wednesday   5:30 - 9:20 PM
Disability Narratives                                                                                                                   Almash

Nothing About Us Without Us is the motto of the Disability Rights Movement, yet disabled people have historically been among the most overlooked and discriminated against groups in society. But times are changing and disabled activists, students, artists, actors, writers, etc. have fought for the right to claim their differences proudly and demand full representation and participation. The works we will look at in this course will raise those voices, and ask important questions about identity and difference, representation, and freedom. We will discuss “disability” as a social construction and challenge concepts of “normal.” Through first-person literary and nonfiction texts we will explore how disability is imagined and reimagined by disabled people, and the ways that disability intersects with other aspects of identity such as race, class, gender, and sexuality. Brace yourself: Revolutions are born out of oppression and violence and the readings for this course can be as vulgar and brutal as they are beautiful and empowering. Together we’ll sort through it all to find relevance.
Course description coming soon
4 hr. 4 cr. (W)(U)
Instructor’s Note:  Hybrid/Blended, required online discussion forums with (optional) weekly meetings during class time (usually for about 1.5 to 2 hours) to discuss the content.

IAS 31701, 1CWE [50787] Monday 6:00 - 9:20 PM

IAS 31701, 1CWE  [50787]    Monday   6:00 - 9:20 PM
Society and Mental Health    Zaid-Muhammad

This course provides an overview of mental health factors, perspectives, and approaches.  It will examine the role of social and structural factors in the perception and treatment of mental illnesses.  Students will explore the incidence and prevalence of mental illnesses in the US; the social consequences of mental illness, such as stigma, marginalization, and isolation; barriers to care; and strategies for treatment and resolution of mental health issues and illnesses.  4 hr. 4cr. (W)(U)

IAS 31702, 2CWE [54533] Tuesday 6:00 - 9:20 PM

IAS 31702, 2CWE  [54533]    Tuesday   6:00 - 9:20 PM
Intro to Social Welfare Policy and Practice    Ortiz-Suloway


This course will provide an introduction to the role that policy plays in social work and social service delivery systems.  This course provides an overview of the history of social welfare institutions and programs with a focus on political and economic foundations of social welfare. The connection between micro, mezzo, and macro practice and how they connect to policy practices and changes.  We will explore policy development and analysis in pursuit of social and economic justice.  4 hr. 4 cr. (W)(U) Instructor’s Note:  Hybrid/Blended.  Zoom, Blackboard, Email

LALS 10204, 5CWE [50789] Friday 6:00 - 9:20 PM

LALS 10204, 5CWE  [50789]    Friday   6:00 - 9:20 PM
Latin American & Caribbean Civilization                                                                             Aguasaco


A survey of Latin America’s economic, social, political, and cultural development from the Pre-Columbian era to the present.  The course will focus on selected topics and themes including: colonization and resistance to colonization; the formation of social structures and labor systems; patterns of dependent development; reform, revolution, and counter-revolution.  4 hrs.; 4 crs.  Note:  This course begins with a discussion of the concept of "civilization" and the ways it could be applied to the territories, peoples and cultural practices currently labeled as Latin American and/or Caribbean. The program continues with an overview of the pre-Hispanic cultures (Maya, Azteca, Taina & Inca). We will discuss the level of sophistication reached by these groups (Scientific knowledge, Writing, Architecture, Government Systems, etc.) Latter, the class will focus on the European and African cultures and people transplanted into these lands during the colonial period. The object of study is composed by a series of cultural products and practices such as narratives, music, art, dance etc. Using Raymond Williams' concepts of Residual, Emergent and Dominant, each student will analyze the cultural product of her/his choice and will present his/her findings in a class presentation and a final paper. Instructor’s Note:  Synchronous.  Zoom, Blackboard

MATH 18504, 1CWE [33037] Monday 6:00 - 9:20 PM

MATH 18504, 1CWE  [33037]                                               Monday   6:00 - 9:20 PM
Basic Ideas in Math                                                                                   Cheregi


Sets, operations with sets, relations, functions, construction of number systems, numerical systems with different bases, topics in number theory, geometry.  Required for Early Childhood Education majors. Pre-Req: Math 18004 or equivalent course. 4 hr.; 4 cr. Instructor’s Note:  Synchronous.  Blackboard

MATH 18504, 3CWE [33921] Wednesday 6:00 - 9:20 PM

MATH 18504, 3CWE  [33921]    Wednesday   6:00 - 9:20 PM
Basic Ideas in Math    Cheregi


Sets, operations with sets, relations, functions, construction of number systems, numerical systems with different bases, topics in number theory, geometry.  Required for Early Childhood Education majors. Pre-Req: Math 18004 or equivalent course. 4 hr.; 4 cr. Instructor’s Note:  Synchronous.  Blackboard

MCA 10104, 3CWE [50792] Wednesday 6:00 - 9:20 PM

MCA 10104, 3CWE  [50792]    Wednesday   6:00 - 9:20 PM
Intro to Media Studies    Virgilio


The aim of this course is to help you understand the roles and activities of mass media in U. S. society. By the end of the semester you will have a much better sense than you now do of the forces that guide the books we read, movies we enjoy, television shows we watch, internet content we use, and even the toys we buy. You will also be able to understand industry jargon and knowledgeably discuss industry trends and issues with executives from a wide spectrum of media industries. The course will be comprised of lectures, discussion, and breakout activities, readings from the required textbook.   This course will use the HYBRID/BLENDED format and include a mix of online discussion and close analysis of media.  It will meet on Zoom for approximately half of the scheduled class sessions. Pre-req.: IAS  10000-10100 or equiv. 4 hr.; 4 cr. (W)

 

PHIL 31404, 4CWE [50794] Thursday 6:00 - 9:20 PM

PHIL 31404, 4CWE  [50794]                                            Thursday   6:00 - 9:20 PM
Philosophy and Film    Woessner


Once upon a time, philosophy was a popular pursuit.  Citizens discussed the nature of such lofty topics as truth, beauty, and justice in the streets rather than in seminar rooms.  As an attempt to recapture this lost legacy, this course examines the artistic medium of film as a possible site of popular philosophical inquiry.  By putting cinematic works in conversation with classic and contemporary texts in the western tradition—ranging from René Descartes to Donna Haraway—this course offers an introduction to both western philosophy and film studies.  Topics to be discussed include not just the nature of truth, beauty, and justice, but also faith, freedom, skepticism, and moral responsibility.  This is an introductory course, so no background in either philosophy or film studies is required, though a willingness to think critically and to engage in thoughtful discussion is necessary.  Our approach will be both chronological and thematic.  The cinematic works that will be discussed include: the silent films of Charlie Chaplin and Harold Lloyd; Weimar-era classics such as The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari and M; examples of film noir, screwball comedy, and science fiction; as well as genre-bending films by Akira Kurosawa, Luis Buñuel, Gillo Pontecorvo, Chantal Akerman, Terrence Malick, and Jordan Peele.  Students with interests in history, literature, media studies, philosophy, politics, social welfare, urban studies, and the study of the Americas are encouraged to enroll. 4 hrs.; 4 crs. (W)(U) Instructor’s Note:  Hybrid/Blended.  Zoom, Blackboard

PSC 27504, 1CWE [50795] Monday 6:00 - 9:20 PM

PSC 27504, 1CWE  [50795]                            Monday   6:00 - 9:20 PM
Contemporary Political Thought    Tirelli


Issues and ideas discussed will include: alienation, anomie, mass society, eclipse of community, bureaucratization, uses and abuses of technology, totalitarianism and ambiguities of modernization. Readings may include Marx, Weber, Freud, Kafka, Arendt, Orwell and other nineteenth and twentieth century thinkers. 4 hr.; 4 cr. (W) (U) Instructor’s Note:  Synchronous, Zoom

PSY 25604, 6CWE [48834] Saturday 9:00 AM -12:20 PM

PSY 25604, 6CWE  [48834]                          Saturday   9:00 AM -12:20 PM
Introduction to Human Development: Adolescence and Youth    Terry


From puberty through early adulthood.  Topics include the physical and psychological changes associated with puberty and the assumption of adult sex roles; cognitive and personality changes associated with developing autonomy; the varying social and cultural contexts within which adolescents and young adults develop; and the relationships of these age groups to social institutions.  Pre-req: PSY 10204.  4 hr.; 4 crs.

PSY 38804, 7CWE [50797] Saturday 1:00 - 4:20 PM

PSY 38804, 7CWE  [50797]    Saturday   1:00 - 4:20 PM
Theories of Psychotherapy    Mercado


Designed primarily to discuss and evaluate different forms of psychotherapeutic intervention.  Concepts such as resistance, transference, and working through will be treated in the context of both psychoanalytic and interpersonal theory.  The aims and techniques of behavioral therapy and case histories will be presented for analysis. Pre-req: PSY 10204.  4 hr.;  4 cr. (W) Instructor’s Note:  Synchronous.  Zoom

SOC 38144, 3CWE [31852] Wednesday 6:00 - 9:20 PM

SOC 38144, 3CWE  [31852]    Wednesday   6:00 - 9:20 PM
Sociology of Education    Wilgus


Analysis of selected social, political and economic forces that influence the school as an institution, and in turn are influenced by the school, especially in urban settings.  Special attention to immigrant, bilingual, and language minority groups.  Required for Early Childhood Education majors. 4 hrs.; 4 cr. (W)(U)

SPAN 12204, 2CWE [50798] Tuesday 6:00 - 9:20 PM

SPAN 12204, 2CWE  [50798]    Tuesday   6:00 - 9:20 PM
Introductory Spanish II    Santos


Development of skills acquired in SPAN 12104. Continued emphasis on oral and written expression. Introduction of modern readings. Course consists of 4 hrs classroom work and 2 hours of online lab work per week.  Pre-req.:  SPAN 12104 or placement. 6 hr.; 4 cr. 

SPAN 22504, 3CWE [50800] Wednesday 6:00 - 9:20 PM

SPAN 22504, 3CWE  [50800]    Wednesday   6:00 - 9:20 PM
Intermediate Spanish    Aguasaco


A one-semester Spanish course at the intermediate level. This course will review the grammar of the Spanish language, enhance vocabulary, and will include literary and cultural readings. It will further develop listening, speaking, reading comprehension, and writing skills through class discussions and the use of multimedia and the Internet. Pre-req.: SPAN 12204 or placement.  4 hrs.; 4 crs.