Course Descriptions

Summer and Fall 2020 Course Descriptions

ANTH 31114, CWEH   Identities, Texts, Literacies
THURSDAY/HYBRID ONLINE 6:00PM - 9:20PM [39237]
Calagione
Literacy holds diverse and contested meanings in both scholarship and everyday life. While we often think of literacy as a unified topic and practice, recent ethnographies explore the phenomenon of multiple literacies and their connection to the formation of social identities and speech communities. This course will take up some of the classic theories considering this recent research that interprets reading and writing and text making as inscriptive practices that both enable and are embedded in particular historical and cultural settings.  Students will be encouraged to pay attention to current debates about basic literacy and identity in urban education. We will also consider questions of textually mediated interactions via social media.       4 hrs.; 4 crs,. (W) (U)
Note: This class meets weekly from 6:00-8:15PM.  The rest of the course consists of posting on Blackboard in journals and discussion forums


EDCE 20604, 2CWE   Early Childhood Education I: Theory, Development, & Practice
TUESDAY, 5:30PM - 8:50PM [39239]
Wilgus
This course will provide an overview of early childhood education theory and practice from historical and sociocultural viewpoints.  Major areas of study will include child development, observation and recording techniques, developmentally appropriate practices, multicultural and inclusive classrooms, authentic assessment, family-child-teacher interactions and subject area methods.  Fieldwork required. 4 hr.; 4 cr. (W)


EDCE 32001, 3CWE   EdTPA Prep Workshop
WEDNESDAY 4:00PM - 5:40PM [39243]
Garavuso
Your performance in the edTPA workshop will enable you to be better prepared for your edTPA submission, one of the requirements for state certification. Teacher Candidates will apply the guiding principles explored throughout the seminar to review and then complete the three main tasks pertaining to the edTPA: planning, instruction, and assessment. The assignments are based on the activities that you will be required to complete for the edTPA, and at the end of the workshop you should have a complete working draft to submit. Required, for student teachers only.



EDCE 32204, 1CWE   Facilitating Math Development in Young Children
MONDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM [39246]
Oppenzato
Emphasis on growth and mathematical development of children from preschool to upper elementary grades through their action and exploration in a supportive classroom environment; course work, readings, workshop activities with children. Fieldwork required. Pre-req.: MATH 18500.  Open only to students formally accepted into the Early Childhood Education Program. 4 hrs.; 4 crs.


EDCE 32304, 2CWE   Emergent to Fluent Literacy
TUESDAY 5:30PM - 8:50PM [25454]
Garavuso
Introduction to the teaching of reading as a language thinking process within a development sequence. Methods and materials of instruction applicable to an integrated curriculum.  Fieldwork required. Open only to students formally accepted into the Early Childhood Education Program. 4 hrs.; 4 crs

 

EDCE 40500, 3CWE Facilitating Children’s Artistic Development
WEDNESDAY 6:00PM – 7:40 PM [00000]
T.B.A.
Students explore the use of a range of art materials and activities for young children at various developmental stages and methods for supporting their total development.  The natural sequences and stages of children's drawings and their link to emergent literacy and other developmental areas. Open only to students formally accepted into the Early Childhood Education program.  Fieldwork required. Pre-Requisites: See Advisor. 2 hrs.; 2 crs.


EDCE 40600, 4CWE  Facilitating Children’s Musical Development
WEDNESDAY 7:40PM – 9:20PM [00000]
T.B.A.
A study of young children's interest and response to rhythms, dramatic play, and spontaneous imaginative experiences which the teacher can guide and incorporate into a program of developmental activities.  This course will involve training in movement as well as music methods in early childhood education. Open only to students formally accepted into the Early Childhood Education program. Fieldwork required. Pre-Requisites: See Advisor.  2 hrs.; 2 crs.[JC1] 



EDCE 40800, 4CWE  ECE Student Teaching and Integrative Seminar in E.C.E.
THURSDAY 4:00PM - 5:40PM [39247]
Diamond
Classroom structures, routines, teaching strategies and skills that build community and maintain discipline with a range of learners.  Understandings and skills to plan a coherent and integrated curriculum. Assessment systems that inform teaching and support student learning.  Respectful and effective home-school relations. The Student Teaching Seminar will be held at CWE. Students who have been approved for Supervised Student Teaching will be registered for this course by the Office of Field Student teaching.   Full time, 360 hours. Coreq.: See Advisor. 6 hr.; 2 cr.


ENGL 31284, 6CWE[CA2] [JC3]    Caribbean Spirits, Colonial Ghosts
SATURDAY (course via videoconference) 1:00PM - 4:20PM [39248][CA4] [JC5] 
Benedicty
Women writers from the Caribbean seek to engage the ghosts of the colonial past -- specters from the plantation and the "mad" colony - by writing about forgotten ancestors, erased histories, and marginalized cultural practices.  In highlighting elided narratives and misunderstood beliefs and practices, these writers accept the challenge posed by Caribbean theorists such as Edouard Glissant, creating new literary forms and characters based on processes of cultural hybridity and Caribbean syncretism.  4 hrs.; 4 crs. (W)(U)


ENGL 32014, 3CWE   Fiction Workshop I
WEDNESDAY (course via videoconference) 6:00PM - 9:20PM [39251]
T.B.A.
For students who wish to advance from Creative Writing to concentrate on writing short stories. This is an intensive course in learning how to use language to convey narrative, theme, emotion. We will work on development of character, structure and plot and all the energy of linguistic engagement that makes someone else want to read your work. You will be expected to write steadily throughout the term, to read and analyze short stories and to take part in class workshop readings of and commentary on student work. Be prepared to work hard.  4 hrs.; 4 crs. (W)(U)


HIST 31474, 3CWE   The U.S. in the 1920’s & 1930’s
WEDNESDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM [39256]
Levine
During the "roaring twenties" and the Great Depression of the 1930s, the U.S. went from a nation of riches to one of rags. This course traces the global affairs which impacted on the U.S. economy, its foreign relations and its involvement in the worldwide community. Extensive time will be spent on the lives of the people of the nation--attitudes towards war, fascism and domestic politics; the effects of economics on people's lifestyles; organizational efforts to achieve women's equality, labor rights, racial justice and world peace; and cultural; expressions of the times, including art, literature, music, theater, dance and, most notably, the Harlem Renaissance.  The primary focus of the course will be on The Great Depression and New Deal: historical context, causes, impact and consequences. The course will be conducted seminar style; student participation and presentation required as well as short writing assignments, a book review and final. Pre-req. IAS 100,101 or any two English courses and any two social science courses. 4 hrs.; 4 crs. (W)(U)


HIST 31824, 4CWE   The History of Human Rights
THURSDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM [39257]
Woessner
We take their legitimacy for granted today, but what are human rights?  When and where were they conceived—and by whom? Who ensures them and why?  This course examines the development of the concept of human rights from its historical origins in the Enlightenment up to the present.  In addition to exploring the idea itself, we analyze key moments in the history of the fight for human rights, including the American and French revolutions, the age of imperialism, and the establishment of the United Nations in the aftermath of the Second World War.  Special attention is paid to the role that political, economic, and military violence has played in the articulation of the human rights discourse we currently employ. We read primary documents in the evolution of human rights, as well as their legal, philosophical, political, and cultural foundations. 4 hr.; 4 cr. (W)(U)



IAS A5105, 4CWE   Slavery, Gender and Resistance in Hispaniola (graduate)
THURSDAY 5:30PM - 7:10PM [39342]
Maríñez

This course examines the institution of slavery in the Caribbean, most specifically Hispaniola, the island shared by Haiti and the Dominican Republic. It also explores the various modes of resistance that led to its abolition and how contemporary authors have addressed it in their works. We will begin with an overview of theoretical texts on what constitutes slavery, its history, legacy and contemporary forms, to then focus on the establishment of slavery on both sides of the island as well as the revolution of Saint-Domingue and its impact on the modern world. Key authors include Franklyn Franco Pichardo, Carolyn Fick, Laurent Dubois, and Michel-Rolph Trouillot. The second half of the course will focus on what is known as neo-slave narratives, or contemporary representations of the lived experiences of the enslaved. Films and documentaries on the Haitian revolution will be complemented with Alejo Carpentier’s The Kingdom of This World, while special attention will be given to the role of gender, sexual exploitation and women’s resistance to enslavement through a close reading of Haitian novelist Evelyne Trouillot’s Rosalie the Infamous and Dominican-American author Ana-Maurine Lara’s haunting poetry collection, Kohnjehr Woman.

Readings, papers, and discussions will be in English but students who wish to read primary texts and write their papers in either French or Spanish will be encouraged to do so.[CA6] 

IAS A6011, 4CWE   Populism and Popular Culture in the Americas (graduate)
THURSDAY 7:30PM - 9:10PM [39344]
Aguasaco
This course explores the symbiotic connection between political populism and the emergence of national and transnational popular culture(s) in the Americas. Following García Canclini’s concept of economic citizenship and Ernesto Laclau’s visions on populism as an articulatory form, this course focuses on revealing the economical and political aspects that constitute both popular cultural practices and products in the Americas. The class discussions and readings provide both a theoretical framework on Populism and case studies of its emergence and recent consolidation in the Americas. 3 hrs.; 3 cr. (grad)



IAS A6130, 3CWE   Contemporary Gender Activism in the Americas (graduate)
WEDNESDAY 5:30PM - 7:10PM [39346]
Robinson
Course description forthcoming

From Santiago, Chile and Buenos Aires, Argentina to Nunavut, Canada near the North Pole, activists of all genders have been taking to the streets demanding equal rights for women and gender justice for all. This course will give students the analytic tools that social scientists use to understand social movements, and in particular, movements around women’s rights and gender justice.  Using the tools learned through the class, each student will have the opportunity to deeply examine one contemporary gender movement of their choice in the Americas.  The Americas are a diverse and interesting place to examine such movements, and we will consider the historical, cultural, political, and religious institutions that shape each social movement in unique ways.  Anyone with an interest in activism, politics, economics, or law is encouraged to enroll.[CA7] 
 

IAS 10000, 5CWE   Writing for Interdisciplinary Studies I (Lit, Art, & Human Experience)
FRIDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM [39125]
Clark
Writing for Interdisciplinary Studies I and II are humanities-based writing courses. Reading includes a wide range of essays, each proposing a groundbreaking theory pertinent to a particular discipline. These essays will be matched with short fiction and shorter essays providing a social context for the theories proposed by writers such as Sigmund Freud, Karl Marx, Dr. Martin Luther King, Carl Jung, Alice Walker and Virginia Woolf, Thomas Kuhn, Charles Darwin and others. In response to these combinations, text-based student essays of at least 750 words will pair interdisciplinary theory with a social context. These courses emphasize critical reading, thinking, and writing skills as well as various rhetorical approaches to the composition of the academic essay. 4 hrs; 4 cr.


IAS 10400, 1CWE   Nature and Humans I
MONDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM [39259]
Eastzer
Designed as an overview of the basic concepts and experiments in the physical sciences and biology, this course provides students with the foundational knowledge required to decipher scientific methodology and contemporary scientific knowledge. Another important goal is to convey an appreciation of both the possibilities and limitations of science and technology. 4 hrs.; 4 cr.


IAS 10400, 2CWE   Nature and Humans I
TUESDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM [39260]
Eastzer
Designed as an overview of the basic concepts and experiments in the physical sciences and biology, this course provides students with the foundational knowledge required to decipher scientific methodology and contemporary scientific knowledge. Another important goal is to convey an appreciation of both the possibilities and limitations of science and technology. 4 hrs.; 4 cr.


IAS 10800, 1CWE   Doing Social Research
MONDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM [39262]
T.B.A.
This course helps to develop needed research skills by focusing on a particular social problem each term.  It asks where did the “problem” come from; how has it been analyzed; and how should we evaluate the answers?  Using historical and contemporary examples, students will learn basic research techniques, from use of the library, to developing a bibliography, to finding and using quantitative evidence.  Recommended pre- or co-requisite: IAS 10000 or equivalent. 4 hrs.; 4 cr. (W)


IAS 10800, 3CWE   Doing Social Research
WEDNESDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM [39264]
Matthews
This course helps to develop needed research skills by focusing on a particular social problem each term.  It asks where did the “problem” come from; how has it been analyzed; and how should we evaluate the answers?  Using historical and contemporary examples, students will learn basic research techniques, from use of the library, to developing a bibliography, to finding and using quantitative evidence.  Recommended pre- or co-requisite: IAS 10000 or equivalent. 4 hrs.; 4 cr. (W)


IAS 23304, 3CWE   The Essay
WEDNESDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM [39269]
Moore
The essay often gets a bad rap these days. It’s frequently associated with the five-paragraph work of formal essay writing. But the essay, in its purest form, is the exploration of an idea, no matter how many paragraphs or diversions—stylistic or rhetorical—it takes. The word essay itself comes from the old French essai, which means, “to try,” and the Latin: rudimentum, which means “trial or attempt.” So, how do we define Creative Non-Fiction? It's not quite journalism. It's not quite “formal” essay writing but essay writing in its wholesome form. Creative Non-Fiction is a branch of writing that employs the literary techniques usually associated with actual people, places, or events. Creative Non-Fiction requires imagination—it evokes an image, draws on emotion, and it creates a lasting impression on the reader.  In this class, we will “try” and write about our lives as we mirror, and read from a broad category of prose works such as personal essays and memoirs, narrative essays, observational and descriptive essays. Pre-requisites: Writing for Interdisciplinary Studies I and II or equivalent. (Formerly ENGL 31134) 4 hrs.; 4 crs. (W)(U)



IAS 23304, 7CWE   The Essay
SATURDAY (course via videoconference)[CA8]  1:00PM - 4:20PM [39270]
Moore
The essay often gets a bad rap these days. It’s frequently associated with the five-paragraph work of formal essay writing. But the essay, in its purest form, is the exploration of an idea, no matter how many paragraphs or diversions—stylistic or rhetorical—it takes. The word essay itself comes from the old French essai, which means, “to try,” and the Latin: rudimentum, which means “trial or attempt.” So, how do we define Creative Non-Fiction? It's not quite journalism. It's not quite “formal” essay writing but essay writing in its wholesome form. Creative Non-Fiction is a branch of writing that employs the literary techniques usually associated with actual people, places, or events. Creative Non-Fiction requires imagination—it evokes an image, draws on emotion, and it creates a lasting impression on the reader.  In this class, we will “try” and write about our lives as we mirror, and read from a broad category of prose works such as personal essays and memoirs, narrative essays, observational and descriptive essays. Pre-requisites: Writing for Interdisciplinary Studies I and II or equivalent. (Formerly ENGL 31134) 4 hrs.; 4 crs. (W)(U)



IAS 23304, CWNT   The Essay
ONLINE [39271]
Benedicty
The essay often gets a bad rap these days. It’s frequently associated with the five-paragraph work of formal essay writing. But the essay, in its purest form, is the exploration of an idea, no matter how many paragraphs or diversions—stylistic or rhetorical—it takes. The word essay itself comes from the old French essai, which means, “to try,” and the Latin: rudimentum, which means “trial or attempt.” So, how do we define Creative Non-Fiction? It's not quite journalism. It's not quite “formal” essay writing but essay writing in its wholesome form. Creative Non-Fiction is a branch of writing that employs the literary techniques usually associated with actual people, places, or events. Creative Non-Fiction requires imagination—it evokes an image, draws on emotion, and it creates a lasting impression on the reader.  In this class, we will “try” and write about our lives as we mirror, and read from a broad category of prose works such as personal essays and memoirs, narrative essays, observational and descriptive essays. Pre-requisites: Writing for Interdisciplinary Studies I and II or equivalent. (Formerly ENGL 31134) 4 hrs.; 4 crs. (W)(U)



IAS 23324, 1CWE   Advanced Composition
MONDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM [39275]
Sweeting
This course will introduce students to cultural and literary theory. We will survey a number of important schools of critical theory, including formalism, structuralism, deconstruction, psychoanalytic, new historicism, post-colonial and cultural studies. Theorists studied will include Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault, Susan Sontag, and Sigmund Freud. Their theory will be studied alongside a variety of "texts", including the poetry of William Wordsworth and Samuel Coleridge, Shakespeare’s The Tempest, Flaubert’s Madame Bovary, and Anderson’s Winesburg, Ohio, as well as Jamaica Kincaid’s Annie John, the art of Edward Hopper, the Log of Christopher Columbus, The National Defense Education Act of 1954, and Why Johnny Can’t Read. The goal is to acquire a new critical vocabulary --"critique"--and, of course, to sharpen critical reading, thinking and writing skills. Students will be required to write a number of shorter essays on the above texts and a final ten-page critical essay on that perennial bestseller, written by none other than Dr. Seuss, The Cat in the Hat.  Formerly CWE 31308. 4 hrs.; 4 crs. (W)(U)


IAS 23324, 2CWE   Advanced Composition
TUESDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM [39276]
Sweeting
This course will introduce students to cultural and literary theory. We will survey a number of important schools of critical theory, including formalism, structuralism, deconstruction, psychoanalytic, new historicism, post-colonial and cultural studies. Theorists studied will include Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault, Susan Sontag, and Sigmund Freud. Their theory will be studied alongside a variety of "texts", including the poetry of William Wordsworth and Samuel Coleridge, Shakespeare’s The Tempest, Flaubert’s Madame Bovary, and Anderson’s Winesburg, Ohio, as well as Jamaica Kincaid’s Annie John, the art of Edward Hopper, the Log of Christopher Columbus, The National Defense Education Act of 1954, and Why Johnny Can’t Read. The goal is to acquire a new critical vocabulary --"critique"--and, of course, to sharpen critical reading, thinking and writing skills. Students will be required to write a number of shorter essays on the above texts and a final ten-page critical essay on that perennial bestseller, written by none other than Dr. Seuss, The Cat in the Hat.  Formerly CWE 31308. 4 hrs.; 4 crs. (W)(U)



IAS 23324, CWEH   Advanced Composition (SUMMER SCHEDULE)
WEDNESDAY/HYBRID 6:00PM - 9:20PM [8919]
Sweeting
This course will introduce students to cultural and literary theory. We will survey a number of important schools of critical theory, including formalism, structuralism, deconstruction, psychoanalytic, new historicism, post-colonial and cultural studies. Theorists studied will include Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault, Susan Sontag, and Sigmund Freud. Their theory will be studied alongside a variety of "texts", including the poetry of William Wordsworth and Samuel Coleridge, Shakespeare’s The Tempest, Flaubert’s Madame Bovary, and Anderson’s Winesburg, Ohio, as well as Jamaica Kincaid’s Annie John, the art of Edward Hopper, the Log of Christopher Columbus, The National Defense Education Act of 1954, and Why Johnny Can’t Read. The goal is to acquire a new critical vocabulary --"critique"--and, of course, to sharpen critical reading, thinking and writing skills. Students will be required to write a number of shorter essays on the above texts and a final ten-page critical essay on that perennial bestseller, written by none other than Dr. Seuss, The Cat in the Hat.  Formerly CWE 31308. 4 hrs.; 4 crs. (W)(U)

 

IAS 24200, 1CWE   Introduction to Interdisciplinary Studies
MONDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM [39279]
Zach
This course explores the establishment, growth, and transformation of academic knowledge in the humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences. It exposes students to the diversity of academic inquiry and the different traditions and vocabularies of humanistic, scientific, and social scientific inquiry, while exploring the potential and limits of interdisciplinary inquiry.  4hr., 4cr. (W)(U)

 

IAS 24200, 3CWE   Introduction to Interdisciplinary Studies
WEDNESDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM [39278]
Edwards-Anderson
This course explores the establishment, growth, and transformation of academic knowledge in the humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences. It exposes students to the diversity of academic inquiry and the different traditions and vocabularies of humanistic, scientific, and social scientific inquiry, while exploring the potential and limits of interdisciplinary inquiry.  4hr., 4cr. (W)(U)

 

IAS 24200, 4CWE  Introduction to Interdisciplinary Studies
THURSDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM [39282]
Zach
This course explores the establishment, growth, and transformation of academic knowledge in the humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences. It exposes students to the diversity of academic inquiry and the different traditions and vocabularies of humanistic, scientific, and social scientific inquiry, while exploring the potential and limits of interdisciplinary inquiry. 4hr., 4cr. (W)(U)

 

IAS 24200, 5CWE  Introduction to Interdisciplinary Studies
FRIDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM [39281]
Woessner
This course explores the establishment, growth, and transformation of academic knowledge in the humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences. It exposes students to the diversity of academic inquiry and the different traditions and vocabularies of humanistic, scientific, and social scientific inquiry, while exploring the potential and limits of interdisciplinary inquiry.  4hr., 4cr. (W)(U)

 


IAS 24200, CWEH  Introduction to Interdisciplinary Studies (SUMMER SCHEDULE)
MONDAY/HYBRID-ONLINE 6:00PM - 9:20PM [8920]
Williams
This course explores the establishment, growth, and transformation of academic knowledge in the humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences. It exposes students to the diversity of academic inquiry and the different traditions and vocabularies of humanistic, scientific, and social scientific inquiry, while exploring the potential and limits of interdisciplinary inquiry.  4hr., 4cr. (W)(U)

 


IAS 31132, CWNT  Housing: The Right to the City (SUMMER SCHEDULE)
ONLINE [8934]
Schaller
This online course explores the meanings we attach to the notion of housing, shelter, property and home.  Departing from an engagement with the concept of “the right to the city” as theorized by Henri Lefebvre, Peter Marcuse, David Harvey and Marc Purcell, we will discuss the usefulness of the concept in working toward a more just and equitable city, especially, as it relates to housing.  We will study the history of housing policy and housing movements in the US, including Mayor DeBlasio’s recently released housing plan. 

This is an online course and requires continuous written participation. The course will be divided into three main modules for which you will write one main post each (500-750 words average) and respond to your peers (with 150-200 words). For the main posts you will be answering guided questions about the required readings. Midway through the course, you will conduct one extended interview with an individual about her/his housing history to develop a qualitative understanding of the meanings individuals attach to their “housing” experiences. You will post both the transcript and your analysis of this interview. Your final paper will be an essay of 1,500 words, for which I will provide guidance.   4 hr., 4 cr. (W)(U)

Note: Main posts: worth 15% each and due Mondays 6/8, 6/22, and 7/6.
Peer responses: worth 5% each and due Fridays 6/12, 6/26, and 7/10.
Housing interview transcript and analysis: worth 20% and due Wednesday 6/8.
Final essay: worth 20% and due Wednesday July 22nd.


IAS 31145, CWNT  Philosophy and Literature
ONLINE [39283]
Clark
A critical examination of the philosophical dimensions of various theories of literature.  Examination of metaphysical, epistemological, ethical, and aesthetic issues and themse in narrative fiction.  Readings from both philosophical papers and works of literature. Pre-req.: IAS 10000 and 10100 or equivalent, any introductory philosophy or critical thinking course.  4 hrs.; 4 crs. (W)


IAS 31144, CWNT  Witches, Masons, Slaves, Revolutionaries (SUMMER SCHEDULE)
ONLINE [8935]
Benedicty
The Hemispheric Atlantic represents the point of contact between: indigenous peoples both honored (and exoticised) and certainly exploited (if not completely decimated) by colonial and neocolonial powers; Africans taken forcefully from throughout their continent through complex systems of slave trading; Europeans engaged in the colonial machine; and later immigrant groups from Asia. As such, Vodou, Regla de Ocha, and Candomblé, among others, as systems of sacred knowledge, have interacted with revolutionary theories deliberated transatlantically among public spaces as geographically divergent as France, the Netherlands, North America, the Caribbean, and Central and South America. As Susan Buck-Morss has argued, the notions of Freemasonry, Vodou, and revolutionary thought were far more imbricated one in the other in the colonial era than they are in how we research and study them today. The course will then look at persons, who have served both legend and history, individuals such as Boukman Dutty and Cécile Fatiman who led the insurrection that supposedly ignited the Haitian Revolution; Tituba – an African/Guyanese/Barbadian slave, who was one of the first victims of the Salem witchcraft trials; or Marie Lavau, a free black woman (or rather possibly three generations of free black women of the same name) who ‘practiced Vodou’ in Louisiana.  Our primary sources will be novels, narrative films, and documentaries. Using literary analysis as our primary research methodology, we will draw on scholarship about the philosophical, social, and historical contexts that have shaped both the moment depicted in our primary texts, as well as the publishing circumstances of the given text.  4hr. 4 cr. (W)(U)

 

 

IAS 31164, 1CWE  Medical Aspects of Disability
MONDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM [56688]
Ortiz-Suloway
This course provides an overview of the medical aspects of disabilities, with a perspective on how they correlate with intellectual and developmental disabilities.  In addition to surveying the diagnosis and treatment, such as disabling conditions seen in AIDS/HIV, Traumatic Brain Injury, Spinal Cord Injury, it will reflect advancements in medical care for specific disabling conditions as well as changes in forces that impact the delivery of that care.  This course will examine social work in physical medicine, stroke, the computer revolution, disability and assistive technology, and chronic pain among others.  It will examine the many conditions and topics that affect people with physical, developmental, and cognitive disabilities.  The students will learn the most useful and updated information on the vast array of disabling conditions afflicting millions of people and how they are best addressed and impacted by our current health care system.  Lastly, we will examine how economic and political forces continually challenge the deliver of care to people with disabilities.  Previous coursework in Disabilities Studies is strongly recommended. 4 hr.; 4 cr. (U)


IAS 31168, CWEH  Digital Media and Society (SUMMER SCHEDULE)
TUESDAY/HYBRID-ONLINE 6:00PM - 9:20PM [8936]
Virgilio
Digital media has become part and parcel of our daily lives, as well as an active agent of social and institutional change, altering the very nature of government, education, health, the news, and labor. This course will introduce students to the history of digital technologies, including the Internet, Web 2.0 platforms and social media, and the “smart” phone and will locate these histories within a sociological framework, asking and answering the question: What “social effects” did these technologies bring about? This class will explore both macro and micro issues, including issues of inequality, digital social movements and community formation, digital labor, surveillance, race and gender online, and digital social interactions. By conducting an ongoing ethnography of our own digital media behavior, such as our “likes” on Facebook, the prevalence of email at work, or the use of a Learning Management System in your classroom, this class will explore the social meaning, value, and agency of our digital lives. This course will be taught as a hybrid course, with some work done online, across various media platforms including Wordpress, Blackboard, Email, Twitter or Facebook, and Text Messaging. While our class will include tutorials to these platforms, which we will critically engage and analyze, it is recommended that students have basic computer skills and reliable access to the Internet to complete the class. 4 hr., 4 cr. (W)(U)


IAS 31211, 1CWE  School Psychology Workshop (SUMMER SCHEDULE)
MONDAY 6PM - 9:20PM [8937]
Zaid-Muhammad
The aim of this course and workshop is to introduce undergraduate students to the history, theories, training, and practice of School Psychology.  This profession is typically described as the application of professional fields of Psychology (i.e. Health, Clinical, and Counseling Psychology) to the classification and treatment of disabilities that effect learning and school functioning.  To this end, students will learn pragmatic processes involved in examining individual, school, and community-based issues that may impact learning capacities, and ultimately effect special education decisions. Students will also be given opportunities to explore a day-in-a-life of school psychologists by virtue of case studies, and interviews with practicing school psychologists.  By the end of the course, students will develop familiarity with the graduate application process, graduate training, and the general practice, ethics, and governing bodies of School Psychology. 2 hr.; 2 cr.



IAS 31216, 2CWE  Women and Work
TUESDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM [39284]
Robinson
This course will examine the impact of women workers on contemporary U.S. society and the role of work in women’s lives.  Women are most unlike male workers because they have two work sites: in the paid labor force and in the household. This course will focus on the intersection, conflicts and tensions within as well as between these work sites.  The primary goal of the course is to provide students with the ability to understand the social, economic and historical contexts of their lives as workers. 4 hrs.; 4 crs. (W)(U)


IAS 31231, CWNT  The Black Athlete
ONLINE [39286]
Orange
Sport occupies a significant place in the popular American imagination. It is also a significant site in what has come to be known as the Black Performance Tradition; arguably more significant than Blackface minstrelsy in its contributions to constructions of “Blackness” and especially, “Black” masculinity. Through the prism of professional black athlete’s particular experiences in varying American sports and periods, we will take on the greater task of understanding the complex ways in which race, class, gender, and sexuality are discussed, understood, and negotiated over time. Black Scholar’s have noted for a number of years now, that the “Black” Athlete is a uniquely politicized figure. Prominent black scholar Todd Boyd states in his latest book, Young, Black, Rich, and Famous that, “The black community doesn’t own oil, a natural resource that the world needs. So we don’t command power from that standpoint…But we do own our talent and our creativity and our ability to transform popular culture. We’ve been doing it throughout ... This is our oil.” The talent they exhibit, and the choices they make as unavoidable social and political actors are the primary subjects of this course. This exploration is designed to take play in cyberspace. Technically it will be a hybrid course, incorporating onsite class meetings with a majority online learning experience. 4 hr., 4 cr. (W)(U)


IAS 31235, 5CWE  Issues for Adults with Developmental Disabilities
FRIDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM [39289]
Sutherland-Cohen
This course will provide an overview of the field of developmental disabilities. The perspective is interdisciplinary, and in addition to surveying the nature, diagnosis and treatment of such disorders as intellectual disability, autism, epilepsy, learning disabilities, and cerebral palsy, related areas such as legal ramifications and advocacy will be studied. This introductory course is recommended for workers in the area of developmental disabilities, paraprofessionals in the public school system (especially in Special Education), and others interested in learning about developmental disabilities 4 hr.; 4 cr. (W)(U)(Developmental Disabilities Certificate Program)


IAS 31257, 5CWE  Digital Photography
FRIDAY 5:30PM - 8:50PM [39294]
Benedetto
This course is an introduction to digital photography. It is focused on using the digital camera to achieve creative and well-crafted photographs.  Weekly assignments will challenge you to photograph a variety of themes, and to select and present images that are interesting, engaging and that express your unique way of seeing.

We will also develop an appreciation for photography as art. Through selected readings and weekly viewing of photographs, we will become familiar with photography as a means of capturing images that conveying meaningful content, thought-provoking concepts, and a "photographic aesthetic".

Included will be discussion of cameras, camera operation and software that is used to maximize image enhancement, editing, and output.  Your photographs will be shown and critiqued in class. You will also assemble a final portfolio of printed works at the end of the course. A digital Point-and-Shoot camera, or a Digital Single-Lens Reflex camera (DSLR), which is capable of extensive manual settings, a portable flash drive and access to a computer are required.  4 hrs.; 4 cr. (U)


IAS 31258, 5CWE  Disability Law and Policy
FRIDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM [39298]
Fleischer
This course examines how the federal government treats discrimination against persons with disabilities in three areas: public life (public accommodations, such as transportation and housing), education, and private life in terms of employment. Divided into three parts, the course first examines the origins of the disability rights movement and the ways this movement contributed to the drafting of these anti-discrimination disability laws. Second, it reviews the statutes themselves-Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act

(IDEA), and the American with Disabilities Act (ADA), as well as how federal courts have interpreted them. The course will also analyze how these laws are enforced. It will pay special attention to how these laws compose a public policy. Finally, the course concludes by reviewing how the ADA has influenced the United Nations which recently passed its own disability rights laws. 4 hr., 4 cr. (W)(U)

 

IAS 31260, 3CWE  Plagues: Past, Present, and Future
WEDNESDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM [43214]
Eastzer
Plagues have shaped human history, and human activity has in turn created the opportunity for plagues. We have all lived through the agonizing medical, social, and moral problems posed by a decade and a half of the AIDS crisis, as well as the appearance of such new contagions as “mad cow” disease and the Ebola virus. What conditions have contributed to this alarming trend?  Taking an evolutionary and ecological approach, we will examine historical plagues, current epidemics and possible future scenarios. We will study how our immune systems combat foreign microbes and parasites, the organisms responsible for disease transmission, and the dynamics of the spread of epidemics. Social, moral, and political issues will also be explored (e.g., the labeling of immigrant groups as disease carriers; the conflict between public health policy and individual rights; the ethics of AIDS testing in Africa.)  Pre-Req.: CWE 10400 or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor. 4 hr.; 4 cr. (W)(U)


IAS 31316, 2CWE  Black Political Thought
TUESDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM [39302]
T.B.A.
This interdisciplinary course (History, Political Science, Anthropology, Literature) analyzes how social constructed ideas of “blackness” have been used for political mobilization in Americas and Africa from the trans-Atlantic slave trade to the present.  A good part of the course will be spent reading primary sources generated by key figures like Marcus Garvey (Jamaica), Martin Luther King (USA), Angela Davis (USA), Léopold Sédar Senghor (Senegal), Nelson Mandela (South Africa) and more. We will also read secondary sources that help us understand the context(s) of these figures.  Overall students should leave the class with a good sense of how racial ideas have shifted with major economic, political, social and cultural changes at the national/global level. Another major goal of the course is to understand that notions of “blackness” vary greatly depending on context.4 hr.; 4cr. (W)(U)


IAS 31317, CWNT  Urban Sustainability
ONLINE [39335]
Schaller
Climate change is a hoax! This is the attitude the US president has expressed repeatedly. but is it? This class is focused on urban sustainability in the context of climate change. Cities and processes of urbanization are often associated with disorder, informality, disease, danger, and inequality. Yet, planners, architects, sociologists, scientists, engineers, writers and artists have also looked to cities for inspiration. They have often sought to harness both optimism and pragmatism to try to imagine and shape a more “sustainable” future.  This class will examine what we mean by “sustainable” cities and neighborhoods in a global context (with a specific focus on the Americas). We will investigate how areas of planning, such as land use, design, culture, housing, food systems, transportation, intersect with the built environment and shape socioeconomic and cultural dimensions of neighborhood life. Given the reality of climate change, we will explore what this means for urban areas. To this end, we will take apart the meanings of sustainability and resilience. How might we relate these concepts to the idea of a more just city?  To do this, we will read about “radical cities” in the Americas to understand how alternative political, social, design and economic practices support resiliency and sustainability. 4hr; 4cr. (W)(U)


IAS 31318, 6CWE  The War on Poverty
SATURDAY 9:00AM - 12:20PM [39307]
Hilkey
In 1964, then President Lyndon Johnson declared what he named a “War on Poverty”.  His administration passed over 20 pieces of legislation that established policies and programs such as Head Start, Medicare, Medicaid, Food Stamps as well as legislation that improved voting rights, labor law, college loans, and fair housing.  This course will explore where we are 50 years later.

How well is the US doing in addressing the problems of poverty and economic inequality?  What are the current statistics and what are the new policy debates? What can we learn from the Johnson policies of the 1960s and from FDR’s New Deal policies of the 1930s? Should anti-poverty policy focus on “creating opportunity” or on “reducing inequality?  Is there a difference? What are the political opportunities and constraints associated with different policies? What are the pros and cons of programs directed at children in poverty?

Those of us in the fields of human services, education, public administration and cultural/historical studies need to prepare ourselves to enter this debate so that we can have an informed voice about the policies that impact our work and the people we serve.  This course will include following current events on anti-poverty debate and reading and discussing the new report on the impact of Johnson era reforms: LEGACIES OF THE WAR ON POVERTY, published by The Russell Sage Foundation, edited by Martha Bailey and Sheldon Danzinger (2013).  Each student will choose one anti-poverty policy area to research and follow in the press this summer. Assignments will include two short chapter summaries of Legacies, and a written report and class presentation on selected policy area. No exams or finals. This is an upper-division course.  Pre-req: Writing for Interdisciplinary studies I and II or their equivalent. 4 hr. 4, cr. (U)(W)


IAS 31403, 4CWE  Community Mental Health: Understanding Diversity and Access
THURSDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM [39336]
Andino
This course will look at existing community mental health models within the context of individual needs and processes, as well as systematic structures.  We will address the changing demographics of communities of color, and the need for a responsive mental and health care system. Of importance will be integrating socioeconomic, historical, ethno-racial and gender narratives into mental health models.  Students will be provided an opportunity to develop their own paradigm in order to expand their vision, and link the contextual and sociopolitical aspects and realities of communities of color. 4 hr. 4cr (U)



IAS 31405, CWNY  Inclusion: Principles in Practice (SUMMER SCHEDULE)
ONLINE [8939]
Dumoulin
A growing number of students with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) who were previously placed in segregated school settings are being educated in general education classrooms. Effectively educating students with ASDs requires an understanding of their unique social, communicative and behavioral challenges. This course will include a study of the history of special education and inclusion, legal issues related to appropriate education, fostering social development and communication, instructional and classroom management strategies, staff training and the collaboration between home and school. 4hrs. 4cr. (W)(U)



IAS 31407, CWNT  Childhood Poverty
ONLINE [39339]
Matthews
This course uses an interdisciplinary framework to examine the issues of poverty as they impact children around the world. The primary objectives of the course include 1.) providing students with opportunities to understand and analyze the impact of poverty over time; 2.) examining the ways in which countries leverage social policy to combat poverty; and 3.) exploring the psychological  and social effects of poverty on children and youth. Special topics include the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, child labor, international trade agreements, and the impact of poverty on institutions that serve children such as schools, healthcare institutions, and leisure/recreation facilities. 4hr.,4 cr (W)(U)



IAS 31507, 4CWE  Mindfulness and Community Health (SUMMER SCHEDULE)
THURSDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM [8941]
Andino
This course examines the impact of social isolation and disconnection in our communities and provides tools such mindfulness to bridge the silence and pain that we are experiencing in the midst of the most technologically connected age in the history of civilization, which has become a public health issue. Something has gone wrong in the way we live, the way we talk to each other, and the way we are with each other, making us more vulnerable to depression, anxiety, and social isolation.  Through different tools and approaches, we can reconnect and enhance our community health.

Students will acquire 1] understanding of the elements of community health; 2] the points of disconnection that may lead to depression and anxiety; 3] tools to bridge the gap between isolation and connection, and 4] the role of mindfulness in public health.  2 hr.; 2 cr.


IAS 31509, XCWE  Latin American Short Stories (SUMMER SCHEDULE)
MONDAY/WEDNESDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM [8944]
Velasquez Torres
This course is a panoramic overview of the different aesthetics trends in contemporary Latin American fiction. It includes discussions of Borges, Magical Realism, Post-Boom, and XXI Century authors. The reading list includes a wide and diverse array of short fiction produced by contemporary Latin American authors. 4 hrs, 4 cr.


IAS 32186, CWEH Disability and Social-Sexual Issues
THURSDAY/HYBRID-ONLINE 6:00PM - 9:20PM [39340]
Senior
This course examines the social, cultural, political, and symbolic constructions of the intersecting categories of disability and social-sexual issues. Through a wide variety of texts and cultural examples, we will explore how disability is gendered; gender is disabled; and both are interwoven with issues of race, class, sexuality, age, and nationality.

Students will explore the relationship between social-sexual issues, such as body image, media representation, dating, marriage, the right to have children, laws, recreation, politics, education, and disability. Disability in this course is defined widely, to include physical, mobility, sensory, learning, and cognitive disabilities, as well as chronic illnesses, mental health and mental/emotional differences - all the ways in which a person's body or mind may be perceived and experienced as different from the norm.   The class will meet in person the 1st, 4th, 7th, 10th, and 15th weeks of the semester. All other sessions will be held online. 4 hr., 4cr. (U)(W)

NOTE:  For online and hybrid courses, the instructor will email registered students (using their CCNY email addresses ONLY) prior to the first day of the semester with information on the date of course access.  If you do not receive this information by the first day of the term, please email your instructor directly for assistance.
 

LALS 10204, 2CWE  Latin American and Caribbean Civilizations
TUESDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM [39347]
Aguasaco
A survey of Latin America’s economic, social, political, and cultural development from the Pre-Columbian era to the present.  The course will focus on selected topics and themes including colonization and resistance to colonization; the formation of social structures and labor systems; patterns of dependent development; reform, revolution, and counter-revolution.  4 hrs.; 4 crs. 

Note:  This course begins with a discussion of the concept of "civilization" and the ways it could be applied to the territories, peoples and cultural practices currently labeled as Latin American and/or Caribbean. The program continues with an overview of the pre-Hispanic cultures (Maya, Azteca, Taina & Inca). We will discuss the level of sophistication reached by these groups (Scientific knowledge, Writing, Architecture, Government Systems, etc.) Latter, the class will focus on the European and African cultures and people transplanted into these lands during the colonial period. The object of study is composed by a series of cultural products and practices such as narratives, music, art, dance etc. Using Raymond Williams' concepts of Residual, Emergent and Dominant, each student will analyze the cultural product of her/his choice and will present his/her findings in a class presentation and a final paper.


MATH 15004, 3CWE  Math for the Contemporary World
WEDNESDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM [36780]
Cheregi
Bombarded by statistics, assailed by advertisers and advocates of all persuasions, the average person needs mathematics to make sense of the world.  This course aims to give students the tools needed to critically examine the quantitative issues of our times. Students will learn the basics of logical reasoning, the use of graphs and algebra to create quantitative models, and the role of statistics and probability in analyzing data.  We will apply these ideas to assess the quantitative claims raised in contemporary case studies commonly discussed in the media. 

Students must obtain and learn how to use a calculator that contains square root and exponential (y*) keys. The use of a cell phone as a calculator is not permitted. Students should bring their calculators to class every day. Attendance and class participation will be considered in the determination of the course grade. Class exams will contain questions that require students' answers be presented graphically and in correct, meaningful sentences. 4 hr.; 4 cr.


MATH 18004, 1CWE  Quantitative Reasoning
MONDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM [36781]
Cheregi
Investigation of the basis for elementary operations in concrete situations, diagrams, and symbolic representation.  Understanding of, and problem-solving in, the following areas: numerical operations, ratios and percents, linear and exponential growth in situations, formulas and graphs; rates of change; mensurational geometry; units, dimension, and scaling.   Co-Req.: Mandatory Workshop. Required for Early Childhood Education majors. 4 hr.; 4 cr.


MCA 30304, XCWE  Documentary in Film and Television (SUMMER SCHEDULE)
TUESDAY/THURSDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM [8946]
Kopp
An investigation of the theory and practice of documentary in its diverse forms as film, television, video, and digital media. Screenings of historically important works are analyzed in light of different theories about documentary practice. Prereq.: MCA 22100 or 22200 or permission of instructor.  4 hrs.; 4 crs.


MCA 31414, 7CWE  Film and Human Rights
SATURDAY 1:00PM - 4:20PM [42483]
Kopp
The medium of film has the ability to render human life and its social structures with startling immediacy and intimacy.  Movies can introduce us to people we’ve never met, take us to places we’ve never been, make us privy to events we did not attend, drag us back into the past or propel us forward into the future; they can make us believe in the make-believe, or shock us with realities we’d rather ignore.  This course will examine the work of politically-minded filmmakers, men and women from around the world, who have used the tools of their trade to shine a light in some dark corners: places where all people are not created equal; where all youngsters are not given equal opportunities; where all workers are not paid a living wage or allowed to organize; where all citizens are not free to express themselves.  Most of the films will be set in the United States. 4 hr.; 4 cr. (W)(U)

 


MCA 33304, 2CWE  Reporting and Writing
TUESDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM [42485]
Cardenas-Pena
Instruction and practice in the basic techniques of reporting, including, interviewing and public affairs research, and writing news for mass audiences.  It includes discussions on libel, freedom of information, fairness, and balance. Assignments involve real people and events. Pre-req.: MCA 23304 or permission of advisor.  4 hrs.: 4 crs. (W).



PSC 12504, 1CWE  Introduction to Public Policy
MONDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM [42487]
Tirelli
A course on what governments do and in what political, social, and economic contexts. Models of the formulation, legitimation and implementation of domestic policies in such areas as health, welfare, education, civil rights, crime and the environment.    4 hrs.; 4 crs.


PSY 24504, 7CWE  Psychology of Human Sexual Behavior
SATURDAY 1:00PM - 4:20PM [42488]
Mercado
Sexual behavior, attitudes, developments, and the consequences of the behavior are examined from a psychological perspective.  Topics include historical and cross-cultural viewpoints, theories of human sexuality, gender roles, sexual dysfunction, sexual preference, psychological development of adult sexuality and aging sexuality.  Pre-req.: PSY 10204. 4 hr.; 4 crs (W) (U)


PSY 24704, 1CWE  Social Psychology
MONDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM [42489]
Zaid-Muhammad
Fundamental concepts and methods used in the investigation of attitude and attitude change, prejudice, socialization, communication, groups, conformity and other topics.  Issues will be studied in the light of theory, research and relevant social problems. Pre-req: PSY 10204. 4 hr.; 4 crs. (W)


PSY 33804, 6CWE  Psychology of Women
SATURDAY (course via videoconference)[CA9]  9:00AM - 12:20PM [42490]
Terry
This course explores the social constructions, theories and research that have resulted in a psychology of women.  It includes the biological, developmental, social and cultural aspects of femaleness in an historical and contemporary context.  Students will be expected to consider and contribute from their own gender-establishing experiences. Pre-req: PSY 10204. 4 hrs.; 4 crs. (W) (U)

 



PSY 36504, CWNT  Family Psychology  (SUMMER SCHEDULE)
ONLINE [11173]
Matthews
This course will explore the psychology of the family unit, focusing on family systems theory and using an interdisciplinary approach. In this course we will examine the relationships between adult partners, adults and children, extended as well as separated/re-married family units and relationships /caregiving of grandparents. Emphasis will be placed on the clinical assessment and treatment approaches of disorders arising within the family unit, such as mental health issues, domestic violence, substance abuse and chronic/acute illness of a family member. Special topics include immigration, health care and local/national policies related to family /parental leave. Cross cultural study will be undertaken on these topics as well. Please do be aware that this course is 100% asynchronous (online) and is held via the Blackboard learning management system. 4 hrs.; 4 cr. (U)


SOC 24704, 3CWE  Community Organization
WEDNESDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM [42492]
Blankely
The premise of organizing is that the world is not as it should be--and we have to change it. Who are we? What kind of change are we talking about? Who are we changing it for? And how do we change it? What is organizing exactly and how is it different from activism and advocacy? This course will introduce students to the theory and practice of community organizing. We will define community organizing and examine its theoretical underpinnings. We will explore different strategies and tactics of organizing, historical contexts and models, and guiding principles. Students will examine key organizing practices, including leadership development, base building, campaign development, decision making, and more. 4 hrs.; 4 crs. (W)(U)


SOC 27404, 4CWE  Urban Politics and Social Policy
THURSDAY 6:00PM [JC10] - 9:20PM [00000]
Schaller
This course examines the changing U.S. city with a focus on New York City. Beginning with an overview of U.S. politics and policy, we explore the impact of economic, political, demographic and social trend on our cities; then examine several contested policy issue-housing, economic development, education and/or welfare. How and why have national problems become identified as "urban" problems?  Is the city a viable problem solving unit? What are the respective roles of public and private sectors. We will address these questions through critical, reading, discussion and writing. The course will meet weekly for a reduced amount of time (6:00 to 8:00pm.) The remaining hour and twenty minutes will be completed over the course of the week in the form of online reading responses or research-based blog posts on our course website. Students will be expected to work online in groups. Work done online will become the basis for in-class  presentations and a final research paper 4 hrs.; 4 crs. (W)(U)

 

SOC 31511, 3CWE  Interviewing
WEDNESDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM [42494]
T.B.A.
This practicum introduces students to accepted interviewing techniques with individuals and groups using both structured and unstructured questionnaires, reviews current federal regulations concerning the protection of human subjects and their informed consent, provides observations of good interviewing and recording techniques, and examines the theory and practice of focus groups. The use of translations and translators and other practical cultural issues are discussed.  Students gain understanding of the function of interviews conducted in the social sciences and in a variety of professional settings including social work, human resources, health services and journalism. Training and supervision in structured interviews with volunteer research subjects will be provided. Advanced students may conduct supervised focus groups. 4 hrs.; 4 crs. (W)(U)

 

SOC 31654, CWNT  The Color Line: Sociological Persp on Race & Racism in 20th Century Amer Life
ONLINE [42495]
Williams
This course will provide an historical and sociological background for examining the concept and expression of “race” and racism in America.  We will not be confined to the traditional Black vs. White notions of race relations, but include Latin, Asian, and Native American experiences, Anti-Semitism and the experiences of “white” ethnic groups such as Italians and the Irish.  We will also discuss the significance of the growth of “mixed race” population. Hopefully personal experiences of race will be better understood, and stereotypes and pre-judgements challenged. 4 hr.; 4 cr. (W) (U)

For online and hybrid courses, the instructor will email registered students (using their CCNY email addresses ONLY) prior to the first day of the semester with information on the date of course access.  If you do not receive this information by the first day of the term, please email your instructor directly for assistance.


SOC 38144, 4CWE  School and American Society (Sociology of Education)
THURSDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM [25250]
Diop
Analysis of selected social, political and economic forces that influence the school as an institution, and in turn are influenced by the school, especially in urban settings.  Special attention to immigrant, bilingual, and language minority groups. Required for Early Childhood Education majors. 4 hrs.; 4 cr. (W)(U)



SPAN 12104, CWEH  Introductory Spanish I
TUESDAY/HYBRID-ONLINE 6:00PM - 9:20PM [28802]
Santos
An intensive course designed to provide the student with the elements of everyday Spanish. Course consists of 4 hrs classroom work and 2 hours of online lab work per week.  6 hrs, 4 cr. For more information on Online and Hybrid classes, please review the General Requirements for Online and Hybrid Courses on page 8 of this schedule.


SPAN 12204, CWEH  Introductory Spanish II
THURSDAY/HYBRID-ONLINE 6:00PM - 9:20PM [42500]
Velasquez Torres
Development of skills acquired in SPAN 12104. Continued emphasis on oral and written expression. Introduction of modern readings. Course consists of 4 hrs classroom work and 2 hours of online lab work per week.  Pre-req.: SPAN 12104 or placement. 6 hr.; 4 cr.

 


SPAN 22504, 3CWE  Intermediate Spanish I
WEDNESDAY 6:00PM - 9:20PM
T.B.A.
A one-semester Spanish course at the intermediate level. This course will review the grammar of the Spanish language, enhance vocabulary, and will include literary and cultural readings. It will further develop listening, speaking, reading comprehension, and writing skills through class discussions and the use of multimedia and the Internet. Pre-req.: SPAN 12204 or placement.  4 hrs.; 4 crs.